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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Oliver Richardson

Many thousands of business related pages have been established on the World Wide Web (The Web) in the last five years. Some of the organisations that have published such…

Abstract

Many thousands of business related pages have been established on the World Wide Web (The Web) in the last five years. Some of the organisations that have published such pages have seen the Web as a medium of massive potential in the future. Despite this, actual direct sales from the web are still fairly low, especially amongst wine producers. A worldwide survey of vineyards with Web sites showed that there are many reasons for these low sales, including legal problems and transport of goods. However, the Vineyards appear confident that their investment will pay off, if not in direct sales then in terms of marketing benefit and cheap advertising. To date, the majority of vineyards questioned seem to be content. This paper discusses the main findings of the survey that produced these results.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Book part
Publication date: 9 January 2012

Brenda Chawner and Gillian Oliver

New Zealand postgraduate library and information studies qualifications have undergone a process of continual revision since the first training school for librarians was…

Abstract

New Zealand postgraduate library and information studies qualifications have undergone a process of continual revision since the first training school for librarians was established in 1946. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of postgraduate library studies qualifications in New Zealand. It continues with a discussion of the establishment of qualifications for record keepers (archivists and records managers), followed by a description of the most recent developments, which established a generic Master of Information Studies qualification, and the associated Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma of Information Studies. It concludes with a discussion of the various drivers for these changes, and the ways in which the relationships between the various professional associations and interest groups and the education providers have evolved.

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Library and Information Science Trends and Research: Asia-Oceania
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-470-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Oliver Richardson

The vineyards of the United Kingdom are small, few in number and struggling against a mass of foreign imports. In order to survive, the owners need a market that does not…

Abstract

The vineyards of the United Kingdom are small, few in number and struggling against a mass of foreign imports. In order to survive, the owners need a market that does not put them in direct competition with these imports. The thousands of tourists that visit rural areas of the UK could constitute such a market. This potential needs to be examined, and the required facilities put in place. Structure planning, both by governments, regional authorities and the industries themselves has been seen as a priority in tourist‐orientated economies throughout the world and UK vineyards need to follow these examples if they are to benefit from tourism. This will involve investment in improved information systems, communications, staff and shop facilities and image. It will also involve developing links with other similar rural attractions and ensuring that as a development, it is both successful as a tourist centre and has the support of the local community.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Oliver Richardson and Charles Dennis

There has been considerable research into wine marketing worldwide, but little has been published concerning the marketing of UK wines. This paper outlines the background…

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Abstract

There has been considerable research into wine marketing worldwide, but little has been published concerning the marketing of UK wines. This paper outlines the background to the retail marketing activities of UK vineyards. Strategies are analysed using three exemplar frameworks: the Ansoff matrix, generic strategies, and the marketing mix. The analysis also makes reference to marketing segmentation. The most active vineyards are pursuing strategies in all four of Ansoff’s growth vectors, with the largest players involved in diversification, for example into tourism. The marketing mixes for most UK wine producers are hybrids between the parameters expected for the “fine” and “beverage” wine segments. For the tiny UK wine industry to exist and prosper, we contend that it is necessary to target niche segments using Porter’s “focused differentiation” approach. Larger vineyards attempt a broader target with tourism activities. UK wines from vineyards of all sizes are differentiated primarily by prestige pricing and by what is effectively “place marketing”.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Oliver Richardson

To propose a model for ethical behaviour based on product, production and marketing methods, and to make use of qualitative data relating to a specific product in order to…

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4125

Abstract

Purpose

To propose a model for ethical behaviour based on product, production and marketing methods, and to make use of qualitative data relating to a specific product in order to test its validity. This model is termed the Ethical Cube.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was developed as a result of early examination of ethical practices. It was then tested using publicly available examples of marketing, production and product information concerning the wine industry.

Findings

The model was found to be effective, if basic. Proposals for improvements and extensions are put forward.

Research limitations/implications

The examples used are largely those that are in the public domain. Facets of a product are classed as ethical or unethical according to the number of reported examples in each area of study – with a special emphasis on production and marketing.

Practical implications

This can provide a standard framework for assessing the ethicality of any product.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to researchers and marketing practitioners seeking to evaluate the public impressions of a specific product.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Leticia Villarreal Sosa, Myrna McNitt and Erna Maria Rizeria Dinata

This chapter examines historical and contemporary issues related to child protection and argues that the social construction of immigrants requires an examination of the…

Abstract

This chapter examines historical and contemporary issues related to child protection and argues that the social construction of immigrants requires an examination of the values that shape child welfare practice. Discussion of the historical context of the US child welfare system is followed by a discussion of the separations of children from their families as a result of deportations or separations at the border. The intersections of child welfare, racism, and xenophobia are discussed, highlighting historical trauma, forced separations of Indigenous and Latinx children, and the importance of social constructions of immigrants in shaping child welfare practice and policy.

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Conflict and Forced Migration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-394-9

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Andrew J. Newman

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326

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Andrew W. Lai and Bernard J. La Londe

The purpose of this monograph is to examine the types of data that are required in the design and analysis of physical distribution systems, and to establish a method for

Abstract

The purpose of this monograph is to examine the types of data that are required in the design and analysis of physical distribution systems, and to establish a method for obtaining such data to successfully accomplish the objectives of a distribution study. The development of the data base includes determining: (1) data specification; (2) data collection; (3) data analysis; and (4) data validation. All of these stages in data base construction are analysed and evaluated in this paper. This discussion will probably be of most importance to those managers contemplating a computer‐oriented study; an attempt has been made in the monograph to provide a managerial as opposed to a technical overview of data base requirements.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0020-7527

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

Alexandra J. Lamb and Jennie Miles Weiner

While educational infrastructure is consistently identified as a key lever for educational change, it is often overlooked in research and practice and specifically in…

Abstract

Purpose

While educational infrastructure is consistently identified as a key lever for educational change, it is often overlooked in research and practice and specifically in relation to technology in schools. By using educational infrastructure as a lens to examine a group of districts' implementation of 1:1 programs, this work provides opportunities for understanding and approaching technology programs in new, and potentially more effective, ways.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the concept of educational infrastructure (Mehta and Fine, 2015; Peurach and Neumerski, 2015), this multiple-case study explores the ways superintendents and district technology leaders understand and enact 1:1 technology initiatives to support educational change.

Findings

The authors find these leaders see 1:1 technology as both embedded in, and engaged in changing, the physical, cultural, instructional and leadership infrastructures. This suggests that 1:1 technology can act as an infrastructure itself and has the potential to support changes to teaching and learning across the system.

Originality/value

This study offers a new perspective to understand and enact the opportunities of 1:1 technology. Specifically, it helps to reframe technology programs away from discrete classroom or school-based interventions to consider and attend to the system-level resources they require and thus increase benefits they can produce. While always useful, such considerations are particularly important in the current context and the proliferation of online learning for so many.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 59 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Peter Boxall, Meng-Long Huo, Keith Macky and Jonathan Winterton

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle…

Abstract

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle individual job tasks or a high level of involvement at team or workplace level in designing work procedures. When implementations of HIWPs are accompanied by companion investments in human capital – for example, in better information and training, higher pay and stronger employee voice – it is appropriate to talk not only of HIWPs but of “high-involvement work systems” (HIWSs). This chapter reviews the theory and practice of HIWPs and HIWSs. Across a range of academic perspectives and societies, it has regularly been argued that steps to enhance employee involvement in decision-making create better opportunities to perform, better utilization of skill and human potential, and better employee motivation, leading, in turn, to various improvements in organizational and employee outcomes.

However, there are also costs to increased employee involvement and the authors review the important economic and sociopolitical contingencies that help to explain the incidence or distribution of HIWPs and HIWSs. The authors also review the research on the outcomes of higher employee involvement for firms and workers, discuss the quality of the research methods used, and consider the tensions with which the model is associated. This chapter concludes with an outline of the research agenda, envisaging an ongoing role for both quantitative and qualitative studies. Without ignoring the difficulties involved, the authors argue, from the societal perspective, that the high-involvement pathway should be considered one of the most important vectors available to improve the quality of work and employee well-being.

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