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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Joseph Monahan

Outlines Hong Kong’s financial system during the pre‐unification era. Looks at recent issues, regulatory changes and its development as an international financial centre…

Abstract

Outlines Hong Kong’s financial system during the pre‐unification era. Looks at recent issues, regulatory changes and its development as an international financial centre. Considers banking, the stock market, the bond & futures market, the gold market, regulatory bodies and monetary and currency policies. Contrasts these with the pre‐unification system in China. Outlines the way that these two systems propose to exist together, looking at the potential benefits and problems this may bring.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

M. Kabir Hassan

Defines an Islamic bank, notes their rapid growth in the last twenty years and explains the financial instruments they use to conform with the prohibition on interest…

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3646

Abstract

Defines an Islamic bank, notes their rapid growth in the last twenty years and explains the financial instruments they use to conform with the prohibition on interest. Considers how they might enhance both urban and rural development in Islamic countries, and the feasibility of an Islamic futures market. Describes the operations of the Islami Bank Bangladesh Limited (the first in SE Asia) and assesses its domestic and international performance, providing many statistical appendices. Recognizes some outstanding problems (e.g. suitable training, legal framework etc.) but believes the bank has great potential for assisting development and shows that “banking without interest is feasible”,

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Managerial Finance, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Colin C. Williams

This article evaluates critically the meta‐narrative that a powerful, expansive, hegemonic and totalising market sphere is penetrating deeper into each and every corner of…

Abstract

This article evaluates critically the meta‐narrative that a powerful, expansive, hegemonic and totalising market sphere is penetrating deeper into each and every corner of everyday life in the ‘advanced market economies’. Drawing theoretical inspiration from an emerging corpus of post structuralist thought that has begun to re‐read the mean ing of work, this dom i nant dis course is here challenged by re‐evaluating the nature and trajectories of work. This will reveal that the organisation of work is grounded in a plurality of economic practices of which market work represents only one segment. Nor is any evidence identified of a uni‐dimensional and linear trajectory towards a hegemonic market. In the final section, therefore, it is shown to be now necessary to engage in a politics of re‐representation of work in these so‐called ‘market’ societies so as to open them up to re‐signification.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Jan Ulijn, Anne Françoise Rutkowski, Rajesh Kumar and Yunxia Zhu

We conducted a pilot study to compare the emotions experienced by Dutch and Chinese students during a face‐to‐face negotiation role play. Emotions play an important role…

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4491

Abstract

We conducted a pilot study to compare the emotions experienced by Dutch and Chinese students during a face‐to‐face negotiation role play. Emotions play an important role in negotiations because they influence the behaviour and judgments of negotiators. The Data Printer case developed by Greenhalgh was used to examine the patterns of feelings that emerge during negotiations. One hundred and four participants (62 Chinese and 42 Dutch post graduate students) role‐played two different characters who were confronted with a payment dispute regarding the servicing of a defective printer. The results of the MANOVA and of the Factorial Analysis demonstrates that culture as a carrier of social values and norms did influence the emotional reactions of the people socialised in different cultural contexts. The paper concludes that in order to facilitate conflict resolution and interpersonal communication amongst protagonists in mono as well as in inter‐cultural negotiation context individuals should learn to manage their emotions constructively.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Carl A. Rodrigues

Describes cultural classifications of societies, based on Hofstede’s cultural dimensions, to form a basis of managerial styles which expatriate managers, in particular…

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6874

Abstract

Describes cultural classifications of societies, based on Hofstede’s cultural dimensions, to form a basis of managerial styles which expatriate managers, in particular, can use as a reference tool. Goes into more detail about: power distance, collectivism/individualism, strong/weak uncertainty avoidance, masculinity/femininity, Confucian dynamism, master of destiny/fatalistic, improvement/maintenance of status quo, enterprise, personnel selection, attitudes towards wealth, sharing in decision making, objective/emotional analysis, and high/low context cultures. Relates this to cross‐cultural management styles, but points out some problems, not least multiple classifications of cultures. Suggests that this article should be used as a starting point, rather than an ultimate cultural guide to conducting business globally.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Rebecca Abraham

Compares the values underlying the behaviour of a sample of 87 US, 56 Jamaican, 42 Bahamian, 106 Colombian, and 12 Israeli managers and professional staff. Refers to…

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1057

Abstract

Compares the values underlying the behaviour of a sample of 87 US, 56 Jamaican, 42 Bahamian, 106 Colombian, and 12 Israeli managers and professional staff. Refers to literature defining individualism and collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, power distance, and masculinity/femininity; as well as literature establishing these values as instrumental or terminal. Hypothesizes that each country‘s respondents will record different instrumental values, with the US respondents being ambitious, independent, intellectual and logical (vertically individualist); the Colombian, Jamaican and Bahamians being ambitious, cheerful, forgiving, helpful, loving, obedient and polite; and the Israelis also valuing the latter six qualities. Describes the methodology used and data analysis. Indicates expected results from the findings, other than the Jamaicans and Bahamians were found to value ambition and independence more highly than hypothesized, and the Israelis valued love and obedience but not cheerfulness and forgiveness. Discusses the implications of the findings in the light of the high failure rate of expatriate assignments.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2017

Salar Salah Muhy Al-Dın and Hourakhsh Ahmad Nia

The aim of this study is to extend the rationale and comprehensive understanding in respect of the notion of functionality and beauty in the smart skin buildings. Smart…

Abstract

The aim of this study is to extend the rationale and comprehensive understanding in respect of the notion of functionality and beauty in the smart skin buildings. Smart skin in buildings plays a key role in improving building functionality, and the future lies in the use of innovative smart skin strategies. The methodology focused on the objectivity and subjectivity of human perception to assess the aesthetic value of a building's smart skin. A theoretical analysis has been conducted based on the results of the investigation model and fortified by comparing the results with the findings obtained through the opinions of experts based in AHP methodology. The study demonstrates that there is a relation between both the aesthetic value and the functionality of the smart skin of a building. The findings revealed the difference in the aesthetic evaluation between the subjective functionality and the objective functionality of the building skin. The findings contribute useful evidence for the promotion of our understanding regarding the aesthetic value of the smart skin of a building, based on its functionality.

Details

Open House International, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Nicholas J. Mauro

Defines Deming’s concept of “profound knowledge”, and shows how it addresses both the behavioural and technical dimensions of leadership simultaneously. Suggests that the…

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1154

Abstract

Defines Deming’s concept of “profound knowledge”, and shows how it addresses both the behavioural and technical dimensions of leadership simultaneously. Suggests that the responsibilities of leaders are to solve problems and to help employees in any way possible by knowing how a system functions, how system components may cause variation, and what the system delivers. Suggests that this knowledge is crucial if the USA is to become a global quality leader.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Colin C. Williams

This article evaluates the coping practices adopted by households in East‐Central Europe following the collapse of the socialist bloc. Drawing upon the New Democracies…

Abstract

This article evaluates the coping practices adopted by households in East‐Central Europe following the collapse of the socialist bloc. Drawing upon the New Democracies Barometer (NDB) survey, it is here revealed that although a common assumption is that post‐socialist societies have under gone a transition to greater reliance on the market, an analysis of household coping practices provides little evidence that this is widely the case. Instead, households in most post‐socialist societies continue to rely heavily on a multiplicity of economic practices in order to secure their livelihoods with little, if any, shift over time towards the use of the formal economy in general and the market in particular. The outcome is a call for recognition and appreciation of the heterogeneous economic practices being used by households in East‐Central Europe and for greater consideration to be given to the contributions of the in formal sector in securing livelihoods.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Na Fu, Qinhai Ma, Janine Bosak and Patrick Flood

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the indirect link between high-performance work systems (HPWSs) and firm performance in Chinese professional service…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the indirect link between high-performance work systems (HPWSs) and firm performance in Chinese professional service firms (PSFs) by investigating the mediating role of organizational ambidexterity, i.e. a firm’s capability to simultaneously explore new ideas and exploit existing resources.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 120 Chinese accounting firms. The authors used hierarchical and polynomial regression analyses to test their hypotheses.

Findings

The proposed positive link between the HPWS and organizational ambidexterity was found. Further, the results showed a non-linear relationship between organizational ambidexterity and organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is limited in terms of small sample size, single industry and self-report data.

Practical implications

Firms which reported a higher level of HPWS demonstrated better performance due to their organizational capability to explore new ideas and exploit existing resources. In the Chinese context, firms that had high levels of exploration (exploring new resources) and exploitation (exploiting existing resources) or that had a high level of exploration experienced higher performance. The authors can conclude from these findings that without exploration, organizational success is difficult to achieve for PSFs.

Originality/value

This is the first study examining the underlying mechanism of organizational ambidexterity in the indirect relationship between HPWS and firm performance in Chinese PSFs. It advances the authors understanding of HPWS and firm performance relationship in an Eastern country and an emerging context of PSFs. This is also the first study to use polynomial regression to operationalize organizational ambidexterity.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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