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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Martha C. Andrews, K. Michele Kacmar and Matthew Valle

The purpose of this paper is to explore surface acting as a mediator in the relationships between perceptions of organizational politics and personality, with stress, turnover…

1211

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore surface acting as a mediator in the relationships between perceptions of organizational politics and personality, with stress, turnover intentions, and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained via survey from 276 working adults, and responses were subjected to structural equation modeling to confirm the measurement model and test hypotheses.

Findings

Surface acting was found to mediate the relationships between perceptions of organizational politics and intent to turnover and satisfaction, and between proactive personality and intent to turnover and satisfaction. No mediating effect for surface acting was found between agreeableness and the outcomes.

Practical implications

Individual differences and situational contingencies do affect surface acting in the workplace, and individual work-related outcomes. Managers need to be aware of personality characteristics and situational contexts that impact surface acting in organizations to help understand the effects of potential divergent attitudes and behaviors on employee outcomes.

Originality/value

Previous research examining surface acting assessed behavior in light of employee-customer interactions. This research extends the study of surface acting by examining the mediating role of surface acting among new predictors including organizational politics, proactive personality, and agreeableness with stress, turnover intentions, and job satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Matthew Valle, Micki Kacmar and Martha Andrews

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of ethical leadership on surface acting, positive mood and affective commitment via the mediating effect of employee…

1809

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of ethical leadership on surface acting, positive mood and affective commitment via the mediating effect of employee frustration. The authors also explored the moderating role of humor on the relationship between ethical leadership and frustration as well as its moderating effect on the mediational chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two separate surveys from 156 individuals working fulltime; data collections were separated by six weeks to reduce common method variance. The measurement model was confirmed before the authors tested the moderated mediation model.

Findings

Ethical leadership was negatively related to employee frustration, and frustration mediated the relationships between ethical leadership and surface acting and positive mood but not affective commitment. Humor moderated the relationship between ethical leadership and frustration such that when humor was low, the relationship was stronger.

Research limitations/implications

Interestingly, the authors failed to find a significant effect for any of the relationships between ethical leadership and affective commitment. Ethical leaders can enhance positive mood and reduce surface acting among employees by reducing frustration. Humor may be more important under conditions of unethical leadership but may be distracting under ethical leadership.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates how frustration acts as a mediator and humor serves as a moderator in the unethical behavior-outcomes relationship.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Min Wan, Suzanne Zivnuska and Matthew Valle

The purpose of this study is to explore the mediating effect of moral disengagement in the relationship between mindfulness and unethical behaviors. The authors also explored the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the mediating effect of moral disengagement in the relationship between mindfulness and unethical behaviors. The authors also explored the moderating effect of perceptions of politics on the mediational chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors administrated time-lagged surveys at two time periods separated by six weeks. Respondents were 206 full-time employees working in the USA. Hierarchical, moderated multiple regression analyzes were used to test the mediation and moderation effects.

Findings

Results showed that mindfulness reduced destructive deviant behavior and unethical pro-organizational behavior through moral disengagement and the mediation effects were weaker when employees’ perceptions of politics were stronger.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate that mindfulness and perceptions of organizational politics combine to have profound impacts on employee unethical behaviors. Organizations seeking to minimize the occurrence of deviance and unethical behaviors may do well to support employee mindfulness and as well as minimizing organizational politics. The findings suggest that the political context has a negative impact on even the behavior of mindful employees. Therefore, building mindfulness while simultaneously reducing politics are equally important goals.

Originality/value

Our study extends the theoretical development of mindfulness research by examining the interactive effects of perceptions of organizational politics and mindfulness and broadens the theoretical rationale for explaining the linkages between mindfulness and unethical behaviors.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Amine Abi Aad, Martha C. Andrews, Jamal T. Maalouf, K. Michele Kacmar and Matthew Valle

Abusive supervision research has clearly demonstrated its many negative effects. The present study uses social learning theory to shed light on mechanisms that could potentially…

Abstract

Purpose

Abusive supervision research has clearly demonstrated its many negative effects. The present study uses social learning theory to shed light on mechanisms that could potentially alter the negative effect of abusive supervision.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 162 full-time employees, we identify and test two potential variables that we believe may moderate, or soften, the trickle-down negative effects of abusive supervision.

Findings

Results demonstrates that coworker support moderates the positive relationship between abusive supervision and coworker incivility such that this relationship is weaker when coworker support is high. In addition, we found that work engagement moderates the positive relationship between coworker incivility and turnover intentions such that this relationship is weaker when engagement is high. Next, we found that coworker incivility mediates the positive relationship between abusive supervision and turnover intentions and that this indirect effect is moderated by both coworker support and work engagement.

Originality/value

We combined three theoretical explanations, social learning theory, contagion effect and the trickle-down perspective, to theoretically argue not only how (through coworker incivility) but when (when coworker support and work engagement are low) abusive supervision impacts turnover intentions. In addition, we extended the research on work engagement by positioning it as a boundary condition. We found that when individuals are engaged in their work, the environment in which they work matters less (because the work matters more).

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Matthew Valle, Martha C. Andrews and K. Michele Kacmar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of procedural justice, training opportunities and innovation on job satisfaction and affiliation commitment via the mediating…

1892

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of procedural justice, training opportunities and innovation on job satisfaction and affiliation commitment via the mediating effect of organizational identification. The authors also explored the moderating role of satisfaction with supervisor on the relationship between the antecedents and organizational identification as well as its moderating effect on the mediational chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used structural equation modeling techniques, using MPLUS 7.4, to analyze data collected from 247 full-time employees who were recruited by undergraduate students attending a private university in the Southeast region of the USA.

Findings

Results demonstrated that the indirect effects for procedural justice and training opportunities as predictors were significant, while none of the paths for innovation as a predictor were significant. Satisfaction with supervisor moderated the relationships between procedural justice and organizational identification and innovation and organizational identification.

Originality/value

This research expands the nomological network concerning antecedents and consequences of organizational identification. It also explores the role of satisfaction with one’s supervisor, as this can affect identification with the organization. This research provides support for the notion that stronger employee–organization relationships lead to positive individual and organizational outcomes.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Kenneth J. Harris, Ranida B. Harris, Matthew Valle, John Carlson, Dawn S. Carlson, Suzanne Zivnuska and Briceön Wiley

The purpose of this study is to understand the impact of techno-overload and techno-invasion on work and family. Specifically, we focus on intention to turnover in the work…

2311

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the impact of techno-overload and techno-invasion on work and family. Specifically, we focus on intention to turnover in the work domain, work-family conflict in the work-family domain, and family burnout in the family domain. Furthermore, this study examines the moderating role of entitlement, a personality variable, in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 253 people who were using technology to complete their work over two time periods, the relationships were examined using hierarchical moderated regression analysis.

Findings

The results revealed that both techno-overload and techno-invasion were significantly related to greater turnover intentions, higher work-family conflict, and greater family burnout. In addition, entitlement played a moderating role such that those who were higher in entitlement had stronger techno-overload-outcome and technostress invasion-outcome relationships.

Practical implications

These findings may provide managers key insights to help manage employees, especially those with an inflated sense of entitlement, to mitigate the serious negative outcomes associated with techno-overload and techno-invasion. In particular, both techno- overload and techno-invasion had minimal impact on negative outcomes when employee entitlement was lower. However, when employee entitlement was higher, techno-overload and techno-invasion had considerable negative effects.

Originality/value

Due to the ubiquitous nature of information-communication technology (ICT) in organizations today, individuals often experience techno-overload and techno-invasion. This research utilized conservation of resources theory to examine these relationships. This study established the relationships of both techno-overload and techno-invasion with key organizational and family outcomes and points to the critical role of the personality variable, entitlement, in this process. The results provide theoretical and practical advancement in the role of technology with people in organizations today.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Suzanne Zivnuska, K. Michele Kacmar and Matthew Valle

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mechanisms underlying prevention-focus and promotion-focus, two distinct dimensions of regulatory focus undertaken to fulfill different…

1936

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mechanisms underlying prevention-focus and promotion-focus, two distinct dimensions of regulatory focus undertaken to fulfill different goals. The authors explore distinct triggers (mindfulness and leader-member exchange (LMX)) and outcomes (role overload and burnout) of each.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is grounded in regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997), and is tested with data collected at two times from 206 full-time workers.

Findings

Findings revealed mindfulness was positively related to prevention- and promotion-focus, while LMX was positively related to only promotion-focus. Prevention-focus mediated the relationship between mindfulness and role overload and burnout, while promotion-focus mediated the relationship between both mindfulness and LMX and role overload, but not burnout.

Originality/value

This research expands the nomological network describing individual and dyadic antecedents to regulatory focus. It also explores the nature of the relationships between regulatory focus and career management consequences, and may allow us to offer useful advice for practicing managers trying to understand employee career trajectories.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Matthew Valle

Although the data concerning the causes, and more importantly, the magnitude, of the gender‐wage gap arerelatively clear from empirical research in economics and business…

Abstract

Although the data concerning the causes, and more importantly, the magnitude, of the gender‐wage gap arerelatively clear from empirical research in economics and business, significant misconceptions still exist. It is a general belief that a woman will earn significantly less for doing the same work as a man, 75 cents as compared to a man’s dollar. Following a review of the empirical literature describing the causes and magnitude of the gender‐wage gap, an exploration of the portrayal of the gender‐wage gap in management texts seeks to understand how this issue is explained to a student audience. Finally, the managerial implications concerning compensation management in organisations are discussed.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Matthew Valle and Kirk Davis

Inter‐rater agreement in a peer performance evaluation system was analyzed using a sample of 44 individuals who rated focal persons in seven teams. Objective information…

4061

Abstract

Inter‐rater agreement in a peer performance evaluation system was analyzed using a sample of 44 individuals who rated focal persons in seven teams. Objective information concerning individual performance on multiple choice tests, as well as information gleaned from individual contributions to team testing and team graded exercises, resulted in high inter‐rater reliabilities (assessed via ICCs) and strong criterion related validity for the performance evaluation instrument. A discussion centers on the effect of providing objective job performance information to evaluation participants.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Matthew Valle and Kaitlyn Schultz

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a comprehensive model of personal and institutional input variables, composed of elements describing status‐based antecedents…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a comprehensive model of personal and institutional input variables, composed of elements describing status‐based antecedents, job/organizational context antecedents, and individual level antecedents, which may contribute to the production of significant (top‐tier) research outputs in the management discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

The development and empirical examination of this model were done with two main goals in mind. First, the nature and degree to which certain factors lead to the production of top‐tier research productivity in the management discipline were explored. Second, it is hoped that information about these relationships could then be used by institutions and individuals so that they could better understand what it takes to adequately prepare faculty members to achieve increased productivity or, alternatively, to decide whether the goal of top‐tier research production is consistent with individual and institutional resources. As such, the results of this investigation should have interesting and potentially important implications for both academic status attainment and career success.

Findings

Hierarchical moderated regression analyses of 440 faculty records revealed that the status of current affiliation of the faculty member, editorial board membership, faculty rank, and the availability of doctoral students were related to top‐tier research productivity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this study have important implications for the careers of management faculty at AACSB‐accredited business schools. Faculty at higher status institutions appear to enjoy a number of cumulative advantages due to increased social, human and cultural capital that support the production of top‐tier research. Additionally, faculty with doctoral student support and those with memberships on editorial boards seem to possess the resources and connections necessary to produce top‐tier research on a consistent basis. Future research should investigate institution‐specific inducements to research productivity (e.g. research support and remuneration) and the exact causal nature of the editorial board/productivity relationship.

Originality/value

Prior research has investigated status effects using broad categories as predictors, whereas this research uses interval values representing research‐based assessments of institution status rankings. Additionally, this research creates and tests a comprehensive causal model of research productivity antecedents.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

1 – 10 of 176