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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

James Poon Teng Fatt

Outlines the benefits of humour in the workplace. Briefly looks at the place of humour in advertising and the effect of it in areas such as attention, comprehension…

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Abstract

Outlines the benefits of humour in the workplace. Briefly looks at the place of humour in advertising and the effect of it in areas such as attention, comprehension, persuasion and likeability. Discusses humour in the workplace and provides some suggestions for employers. Covers humour in training and concludes that modest investment in all these areas can bring benefits to the workplace.

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Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1986

Jack Mendleson, Steven Golen and Patricia Adams

Until recently most managers were wary of using humour as a communication technique in the business setting, believing that the two did not mix. Now comic techniques are…

Abstract

Until recently most managers were wary of using humour as a communication technique in the business setting, believing that the two did not mix. Now comic techniques are gaining acceptance as tools of business communication. Humour and laughter are coping skills. One of the most important tasks of a manager is to implement these skills throughout all levels of the firm to preserve the individual health of the employees and the entire firm. Humour can promote “good feelings” on the job and enhance oral presentations. Managers may not adopt a humorous approach themselves but should accept it in others and try to see the humour in situations. Those who do not want to employ humorous techniques should match it to the situation and/or audience, and never use it at the expense of an individual.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 86 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Gundars E. Kaupins

This article compares the humour used in university and corporatetraining programmes and discusses survey implications. Based on a surveyof 183 university business…

Abstract

This article compares the humour used in university and corporate training programmes and discusses survey implications. Based on a survey of 183 university business professors and 243 corporate trainers, both groups were found to use similar types of humour (e.g. short stories, exaggeration), have similar reasons for using humour (e.g. help trainees relax, keep training interesting), and use humour in similar settings (e.g. humour occurs in lectures most often). Based on survey results and a literature review, both groups should consider making their humour understandable, non‐coercive, and relevant to the training situation. University and corporate trainers should also listen to what types of humour can be students like. Practising humour can be a way to gain these humour skills.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

John McIlheran

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how humor can be used to help improve understanding of a message, as well as to validate the findings of the Booth‐Butterfield…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how humor can be used to help improve understanding of a message, as well as to validate the findings of the Booth‐Butterfield humor orientation scale.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the Booth‐Butterfield humor orientation scale to measure the effectiveness of using humor to maintain focus on written or verbal messages.

Findings

The results showed that participants who rated higher on this scale are more apt to understand and use humor in their daily communications with each other and the home office. The study also showed that there is no significant difference in the frequency and effectiveness of humor usage by participants based on age or geographic location.

Research limitations/implications

All of the managers for this conservative company are currently male. This limits any analysis of this study based on gender. It also removes gender as an additional variable, which could have complicated the results.

Practical implications

Humor has been proven to contribute to increases in compliance, learning, attitude shifts and enjoyment. It also contributes to improved organizational cohesiveness. By knowing whether an audience perceives humor differently, based on age or location, the sender can target the message more effectively.

Originality/value

This paper took the findings of the Booth‐Butterfield study and expanded the parameters to include a larger age range and demographic area to test the impact on the humor orientation scale.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Sari Lenggogeni, Ann Suwaree Ashton and Noel Scott

This study aims to extend the use of psychology in the field of tourism crisis and disaster management using coping theory. It examines how resident emotions change in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to extend the use of psychology in the field of tourism crisis and disaster management using coping theory. It examines how resident emotions change in the extended prodromal stage of the COVID-19 pandemic and how residents used humour to cope with stress from not being able to travel.

Design/methodology/approach

Early COVID-19 (March–April 2020) was characterised by negative media reports, lockdowns and travel restrictions but for Indonesia, no direct effects in terms of loss of life. This unusual context has led to phenomena not previously studied – humour as a coping strategy. This research consists of two studies: Study 1 used thematic analysis of interviews before and during the early lockdown period with a panel of 245 quarantined residents who had travelled in the prior two years. Study 2 followed up using a #hasthtag analysis of travel-related videos content posted on Instagram and TikTok.

Findings

The COVID-19 global pandemic is an unusual crisis which has resulted in high levels of stress and uncertainty. This study identified the unusual characteristics of the COVID-19 crises and changes of quarantined resident’s emotions during the pre-event and prodromal stages. In addition, this study found the use of humour as a coping mechanism during the lockdown period and the use of social media as the vehicle for humour.

Research limitations/implications

These findings may be generalisable only to a crises and disasters with an extended prodromal stage. Interestingly, climate change has some similar characteristics where warning signs are available, but the personal implications have not yet become apparent.

Practical implications

The emotions associated with crisis are dynamic and crisis managers may tailor communication to help deal with stress.

Social implications

This research provides an insight into how humorous content can be used to reduce negative emotions in the early stage of a stressful event associated with travel restrictions. This study may be suitable for use in integrated marketing communication in post-recovery messaging for the tourism industry and destination management organisation in the digital platform.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate “dark humour” during the early stages of COVID-19 and also the use of coping strategies to explain how humour can reduce stress.

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International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2021

Mengying Zhang, Dogan Gursoy, Zhangyao Zhu and Si Shi

This study aims to investigate the impact of both physical and personality-related anthropomorphic features of an artificial intelligence service robot on the cognitive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of both physical and personality-related anthropomorphic features of an artificial intelligence service robot on the cognitive and affective appraisals and acceptance of consumers during service delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses that investigate the effects of service robots’ physical appearance on the emphasis consumers place on each evaluation criteria they use in determining their willingness to accept the use of service robots in service delivery and the moderating role of sense of humor are tested by conducting two studies using scenario-based experiments.

Findings

The results show that humanlike appearance leads to higher performance expectancy, mascot-like appearance generates higher positive emotions and machine-like appearance results in higher effort expectancy. The effects of humanlike and mascot-like appearances on consumer acceptance are moderated by the sense of humor of service robots. However, the sense of humor effect is attenuated with a machine-like appearance owing to the lack of anthropomorphism.

Practical implications

This study provides crucial insights for hospitality managers who plan to use service robots in service delivery. The findings highlight the key roles of appearance type and sense of humor of service robots in influencing the appraisals and acceptance of consumers regarding the use of service robots in service delivery.

Originality/value

This study focuses on comparing the effects of traditional and mascot-like appearances of service robots on consumer appraisals and identifies sense of humor as a cute anthropomorphized personality trait of service robots.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Shuang Yang, Jian Cai and Hongwei Tu

This study examines the effects of the online brand community's (OBC) humor climate on the value cocreation (VCC) behavior of consumers using the affective events theory…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the effects of the online brand community's (OBC) humor climate on the value cocreation (VCC) behavior of consumers using the affective events theory. It also evaluates the serial mediating roles of positive emotions and brand engagement and the moderating effect of membership duration.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 601 Chinese consumers of OBCs using an online questionnaire survey and applied structural equation modeling to analyze the data.

Findings

The authors found a positive relationship between OBC humor climate and VCC behavior, which was mediated by positive emotions and brand engagement. Additionally, there was a serial mediation effect of these two variables. The influence of the OBC humor climate on positive emotions was stronger for short-term members than long-term ones.

Practical implications

This research contributes toward OBC management and VCC marketing strategy for constructing brand equity.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to focus on the significance of the OBC humor climate, thus enriching the OBC literature and providing a new perspective on how to facilitate VCC behavior. It also broadens the application of the affective events theory in marketing.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2015

Katja M. Guenther, Natasha Radojcic and Kerry Mulligan

In this paper, we demonstrate the linkages between humor and political and cultural opportunities and present an analysis of the importance of humor for collective…

Abstract

In this paper, we demonstrate the linkages between humor and political and cultural opportunities and present an analysis of the importance of humor for collective identity and framing in the New Atheist Movement, a social movement focused on reducing the social stigma of atheism and enforcing the separation of church and state. Drawing on a qualitative analysis of interview, ethnographic, and web-based data, we show why the New Atheist Movement is able to use humor effectively in the political and cultural environment. We further demonstrate that humor is central to the development and maintenance of collective identity and to the framing strategies used by the New Atheist Movement. Through a diverse range of forms, including jokes, mockery, and satire, humor is a form of resistance and also can be harnessed to support the goals of social movements. We use this case study as a basic for advocating for greater attention to humor within social movement studies, and greater attention to social movements in humor studies.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-359-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Dong-Woo Koo, Min-Seong Kim and Young-Wook Kang

This study investigates the structural relationships among humor leadership, psychological empowerment, innovative behavior, and job performance in the Korean hotel…

Abstract

This study investigates the structural relationships among humor leadership, psychological empowerment, innovative behavior, and job performance in the Korean hotel industry. This study reveals following key major findings. First, a leader’s use of humor in leadership significantly and positively influences an employee’s psychological empowerment. Second, an employee’s psychological empowerment significantly and positively influences innovative behavior and job performance. However, innovative behavior does not significantly influence job performance. In the final section, theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Chen Yang, Fu Yang and Chao Ding

The current study examines the effects of leader humor on the creativity of employees by focusing on the mediating role of relational energy and the moderating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study examines the effects of leader humor on the creativity of employees by focusing on the mediating role of relational energy and the moderating role of traditionality.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used three-wave data from 302 employee–supervisor dyads and tested the hypotheses using hierarchical regression and bootstrapping.

Findings

The results indicated that leader humor was positively associated with employee creativity, relational energy mediated this influence. Besides, traditionality not only moderated the relationship between leader humor and relational energy but also attenuated the indirect relationship between leader humor and employee creativity through relational energy.

Practical implications

Leadership training programs can be used to assist leaders in improving their humorous skills. In addition, supervisors should implement humorous behaviors according to the different levels of traditionality of employees.

Originality/value

Integrating conservation of resource theory, this study provides solid evidence that the extent to which relational energy mediates the relationship between leader humor and employee creativity depends on traditionality. It provides a new direction for leader humor.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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