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1 – 10 of over 58000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Nikos Bozionelos and Stuart Lusher

Reports on the experience of production team leaders and their line managers on the quality of training and development of the former. The setting was the UK plant of a…

2150

Abstract

Reports on the experience of production team leaders and their line managers on the quality of training and development of the former. The setting was the UK plant of a US‐based global organization competing in the telecommunications technology sector. Team leaders’ and line managers’ views were complemented with data from personnel records. The findings suggested that team leaders’ development was perceived to be inadequate in both the technical and leadership domains. Team leaders perceived deficiencies in their technical training and competence; and line managers viewed that team leaders lacked managerial and leadership skills. The analysis of personnel records corroborated those views as it suggested that existing training and development structures were not being properly implemented or designed. This situation can impact unit performance. Suggestions regarding rectification of such situations are made.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Suyang Ye and Teng Zhao

This paper aims to extend the literature on how to harness the expertise of team members. This paper suggests that the leader’s expertise recognition plays an important…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend the literature on how to harness the expertise of team members. This paper suggests that the leader’s expertise recognition plays an important role in enhancing team effectiveness. In addition, leader’s personal dispositions shape how the leader’s recognition could benefit team expertise utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilizes a two-wave, multi-source (team leaders and team members rated) survey design from 78 information technology teams to test the proposed moderated mediation model.

Findings

The data analysis revealed that a leader’s expertise recognition is positively related to team expertise utilization. Moreover, the leaders’ traits (i.e. social dominance and reflectiveness) act as important boundary conditions of this relationship. Specifically, only when the leader is less socially dominant or more reflective can they fully utilize the expertise recognition and enhance team creativity through team expertise utilization.

Originality/value

This study investigated an important issue that expertise utilization research has hitherto overlooked: the effects of leader’s expertise recognition on team expertise utilization and team creativity.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2022

Muhammad Waheed Akhtar, Muhammad Kashif Aslam, Chunhui Huo, Minhas Akbar, Muhammad Usman Afzal and Muhammad Hasan Rafiq

This study aims to investigate the impact of authentic leaders on the performance of educational leaders in public and private universities in Pakistan. The study further…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of authentic leaders on the performance of educational leaders in public and private universities in Pakistan. The study further examines the moderating role of social capital in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 259 academic heads of public and private universities and tested hypotheses using macro PROCESS.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that authentic leaders have a significant positive effect on team leader performance in both public and private universities. In addition, the authors establish that the positive impact of authentic leaders on team leader performance is stronger among employees with high social capital.

Originality/value

The education literature lacks evidence of the process through which authentic leaders influence team leader performance. The study is unprecedented in assessing whether social capital moderates the direct influence of authentic leaders on team leader performance.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2005

Aparna Joshi and Mila Lazarova

In this chapter we question whether current conceptualizations of global leadership competencies adequately address the dynamic and complex nature of the multinational team

Abstract

In this chapter we question whether current conceptualizations of global leadership competencies adequately address the dynamic and complex nature of the multinational team (MNT) context. We report findings from a study that incorporated the perspectives of MNT leaders as well as members on MNT leadership. We asked MNT leaders and their team members to identify the competencies that they believe are needed for effectively managing MNTs. The findings from this study promise to enhance our understanding about the specific nature of the MNT context, as viewed by the two parties that are at the frontline of multinational teamwork: team members and leaders. We use this dual perspective to clarify global competencies that MNT leaders may need to develop in themselves, and to propose a framework that may assist multinational organizations in identifying, rewarding, and developing MNT leaders.

Details

Managing Multinational Teams: Global Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-349-5

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Desirée H. van Dun and Celeste P.M. Wilderom

Why are some lean workfloor teams able to improve their already high performance, over time, and others not? By studying teams' and leaders' behaviour-value patterns, this…

1706

Abstract

Purpose

Why are some lean workfloor teams able to improve their already high performance, over time, and others not? By studying teams' and leaders' behaviour-value patterns, this abductive field study uncovers a dynamic capability at the team level.

Design/methodology/approach

Various methods were employed over three consecutive years to thoroughly examine five initially high-performing lean workfloor teams, including their leaders. These methods encompassed micro-behavioural coding of 59 h of film footage, surveys, individual and group interviews, participant observation and archival data, involving objective and perceptual team-performance indicators. Two of the five teams continued to improve and perform highly.

Findings

Continuously improving high lean team performance is found to be associated with (1) team behaviours such as frequent performance monitoring, information sharing, peer support and process improvement; (2) team leaders who balance, over time, task- and relations-oriented behaviours; (3) higher-level leaders who keep offering the team face-to-face support, strategic clarity and tangible resources; (4) these three actors' endorsement of self-transcendence and openness-to-change work values and alignment, over time, with their behaviours; and (5) coactive vicarious learning-by-doing as a “stable collective activity pattern” among team, team leader, and higher-level leadership.

Originality/value

Since lean has been undertheorised, the authors invoked insights from organisational behaviour and management theories, in combination with various fine- and coarse-grained data, over time. The authors uncovered actors' behaviour-value patterns and a collective learning-by-doing pattern that may explain continuous lean team performance improvement. Four theory-enriching propositions were developed and visualised in a refined model which may already benefit lean practitioners.

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Nathalie Drouin, Ralf Müller, Shankar Sankaran and Anne Live Vaagaasar

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to identify how horizontal leaders (within project teams) execute their leadership task in the context of balanced leadership; and to…

2025

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to identify how horizontal leaders (within project teams) execute their leadership task in the context of balanced leadership; and to pinpoint scenarios that can occur when horizontal leaders are identified and empowered by the vertical leader (senior or project managers) and a project task is handed over to them to lead. This research is based on the concept of balanced leadership, which conceptualizes leadership as a dynamic, situation-dependent transition of leadership authority from a vertical leader (like a project manager) to a horizontal leader (a project team member) and back again, in order to contribute positively to a project’s success. Balanced leadership consists of five events (nomination, identification, empowerment, horizontal leadership and its governance, and transition). This paper focuses on the fourth event, and its specific aspect of leadership distribution between horizontal and vertical leader. This event begins when a team member(s) accepts the empowerment to assume the role of horizontal leader. This paper explicitly links the leadership style of the vertical leader based on Frame’s (1987) leadership styles and the nature of decisions taken by both the vertical and horizontal leaders to deliver the project.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used for this paper is the qualitative phase of a sequential mixed methods (qualitative-quantitative) study. Data were collected through case studies in four different countries, using a maximum variety sampling approach. Data collection was through interviews of vertical leaders (senior leaders who were often sponsors of projects or members of senior management or project managers) and horizontal leaders (team leaders or members) in a variety of industry sectors. Data analysis was done through initial coding and constant comparison to arrive at themes. Thematic analysis was used to gain knowledge about the split of leadership and decision-making authority between the horizontal and vertical leader(s).

Findings

The results show that for Canadian and Australian projects, a combination of autocratic and democratic leadership styles were used by vertical leaders. In the case of Scandinavian projects, a democratic leadership style has been observed. Linked to these leadership styles, the horizontal decision making is predominantly focused on technical decisions and to daily task decisions to deliver the project. Delegation occurs most of the time to one specific team member, but occasionally to several team members simultaneously, for them to work collaboratively on a given issue.

Research limitations/implications

The paper supports a deeper investigation into a leadership theory, by validating one particular event of the balanced leadership theory, which is based on Archer’s (1995) realist social theory. The findings from this paper will guide organizations to facilitate an effective approach to balancing the leadership roles between vertical and horizontal leaders in their projects. The findings can also be used to develop horizontal leaders to take up more responsibilities in projects.

Originality/value

The originality lies in the new leadership theory called balanced leadership, and its empirical validation. It is the first study on the leadership task distribution between vertical and horizontal leadership in projects. Its value is new insights, which allow practitioners to develop practices to find and empower the best possible leader at any given time in the project and academics to develop a more dynamic and, therefore, more realistic theory on leadership as it unfolds in projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Curt Gilstrap

This paper aims to examine how mobile technologies impact virtual team leaders and provides insight into how mobile technologies afford leaders varied capacity to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how mobile technologies impact virtual team leaders and provides insight into how mobile technologies afford leaders varied capacity to accomplish their team work.

Design/methodology/approach

The author addresses the research questions by assessing a large, qualitative data set drawn from surveyed mobile team leaders, analyzing the data using Leximancer software to explore naturally emerging concepts and then interpreting the data thematics using axial coding.

Findings

In addition to demonstrating that virtual team leaders are well aware they use mobile technologies regularly, this paper also suggests e-leaders be known as m-leaders, clarifies the entanglements of mobility and leadership practices and offers insight into the m-leader affordance dimensions of multimediality, multimodality, multichronicity and multimotility.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to investigate team leaders relative to mobile technology as well as what such technology offers m-leaders and mobile teams. Additionally, the size of the data set provides unique insight into m-leaders’ experiences across myriad sectors.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Tiina Maria Brandt and Piia Edinger

This study aims to investigate whether transformational leadership exists in teams, and if so, whether it is represented in a similar way as in more traditional leadership…

6303

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether transformational leadership exists in teams, and if so, whether it is represented in a similar way as in more traditional leadership situations. The study also aims to determine whether a team leader’s sex has an influence on the relationship between personality and team leadership when team members evaluate the leader’s behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative analysis is conducted on input from 104 team leaders and 672 team members from a Finnish university. Data were collected during university courses, and the team leaders’ transformational leadership styles were evaluated by team members at the end of the courses.

Findings

The results indicate that the transformational leadership questionnaire is applicable when studying team leadership; the Visioning dimension might be absent, but Modelling, Enabling, Challenging and Rewarding dimensions represent transformational leadership in teams. Women tend to be more transformational team leaders than men. Personality seems to influence both sexes, so that extraverted and judging personality types are more transformational leaders than introverted and perceiving ones. In relation to sex, introverted, sensing, thinking and perceiving female leaders are regarded as more transformational than men with similar preferences. Additionally, some personality preferences seem to be sex-neutral in terms of team transformational leadership when rated by team members.

Originality/value

There is no previous study combining these variables in the academic team context.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Sandy Jeanquart Miles and Glynn Mangold

The focus of this paper was twofold: to examine critical team leader behaviors (as perceived by the subordinate) that result in team member satisfaction; and to determine…

10070

Abstract

The focus of this paper was twofold: to examine critical team leader behaviors (as perceived by the subordinate) that result in team member satisfaction; and to determine if there is a significant difference between the perceptions of team leaders and team members regarding the level of team satisfaction and factors that predict team leader performance. Results indicate that team member satisfaction was influenced by: the extent to which communication within the group was open; and the team leaders’ performance. Team leader performance was influenced by the team members’ satisfaction with their leaders’ ability to resolve conflicts and the teams’ openness in communication. Team members’ and leaders’ perceptions did not differ significantly regarding open communication in the group, however, team members assessed their leaders’ performance less favorably than the team leaders assessed themselves and were less satisfied with the team leaders’ ability to resolve conflicts.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Lucy Liu and Adela J. McMurray

This multi‐method case study examined the roles, functions, capabilities, job satisfaction, strengths, weaknesses and skill gaps of frontline team leaders working on the…

2220

Abstract

This multi‐method case study examined the roles, functions, capabilities, job satisfaction, strengths, weaknesses and skill gaps of frontline team leaders working on the shopfloor in the Australian automobile industry. The study was conducted in a large automobile manufacturing company employing 4,500 employees and rated as one of the top 22 organisations in Australia according to net revenue. Extensive data were gathered through two surveys involving 121 frontline team leaders and semi‐structured interviews with 100 team leaders, 100 group leaders, and 30 general forepersons. The findings showed that there have been relatively few theoretical and practical efforts to specify the functional requirements of frontline leaders who occupy the first level entry point of leadership positions and hence career progression in the automobile industry. The study proposes a definition for frontline leadership.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 28 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 58000