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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Arun Aggarwal, Kamrunnisha Nobi, Amit Mittal and Sanjay Rastogi

The personality of an individual plays a vital role in the way an individual perceives organizational politics and justice in the workplace. However, there is meager…

Abstract

Purpose

The personality of an individual plays a vital role in the way an individual perceives organizational politics and justice in the workplace. However, there is meager research on how an individual's personality affects the perceptions of organizational politics and justice. This study endeavors to fill this gap by analyzing the mediating role of organizational politics perceptions on the relationship between Big Five personality dimensions and organizational justice by controlling various demographic variables. The study also proposes a benchmarking model that the policymakers can use to create positive organizational justice perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this cross-sectional research, the data were collected through a multi-stage random sampling technique from 493 faculty members working in four public universities of Punjab, India. Out of 493 employees, 76.9% of the employees were assistant professors, 12.0% were associate professors and 11.2% were assistant professors. 51.5% of the employees were female, and 48.5% of the employees were male. To test the proposed hypothesized relationships, a structural equation modeling technique was used.

Findings

Results of the structural equation modeling showed that openness to experience, conscientiousness and extraversion have a negative relationship with perceptions of organizational politics. However, their relationship with perceptions of organizational justice is positive. Neuroticism has a positive relationship with perceptions of organizational politics, whereas it has a negative relationship with perceptions of organizational justice. Results also showed that high perceptions of organizational politics have a negative effect on employee's perceptions regarding organizational justice. The mediation analysis results showed that perceptions of organizational politics mediate the relationship between an individual's personality and perceptions of organizational justice.

Originality/value

There is a scant amount of research available that considers Big Five personality dimensions and organizational politics as the antecedents of organizational justice. Hence, the current study tries to fill this research gap by proposing a research model on antecedents and consequences of perceptions of organizational politics based on the cognitive-affective processing system (CAPS).

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

June M.L. Poon

A model of perceptions of organizational politics was developed and tested using a sample of 208 Malaysian employees from diverse occupations and organizations. Results of

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7991

Abstract

A model of perceptions of organizational politics was developed and tested using a sample of 208 Malaysian employees from diverse occupations and organizations. Results of a path analysis on the survey data showed that job ambiguity, scarcity of resources, and trust climate were significant predictors of perceptions of organizational politics. Perceptions of organizational politics, in turn, mediated the effects of these situational antecedents on job stress, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Specifically, employees who perceived a high level of politics in their workplace reported higher levels of stress, lower levels of job satisfaction, and higher levels of intention to quit than did employees who perceived a low level of politics. Implications of the findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

L.A. Witt, Darren C. Treadway and Gerald R. Ferris

We examined the moderating role of age on the politics perceptionsorganizational commitment relationship. Confirmatory factor analyses of data collected from 633 office…

Abstract

We examined the moderating role of age on the politics perceptionsorganizational commitment relationship. Confirmatory factor analyses of data collected from 633 office employees of a private sector organization indicated that the scales measuring politics and commitment reflected unique constructs. Perceptions of politics were inversely but weakly related to commitment. However, results of hierarchical moderated multiple regression analysis revealed that perceptions of organizational politics and commitment were essentially unrelated among workers in and above their 40s, but were moderately related among younger workers. Implications of the results and directions for future research are discussed.

Details

Organizational Analysis, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1551-7470

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Zinta S. Byrne, Steven G. Manning, James W. Weston and Wayne A. Hochwarter

Research on perceptions of organizational politics has mostly explored the negative aspects and detrimental outcomes for organizations and employees. Responding to recent…

Abstract

Research on perceptions of organizational politics has mostly explored the negative aspects and detrimental outcomes for organizations and employees. Responding to recent calls in the literature for a more balanced treatment, we expand on how positive and negative organizational politics perceptions are perceived as stressors and affect employee outcomes through their influence on the social environment. We propose that employees appraise positive and negative organization politics perceptions as either challenge or hindrance stressors, to which they respond with engagement and disengagement as problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies. Specifically, employees who appraise the negative politics perceptions as a hindrance, use both problem- and emotion-focused coping, which entails one of three strategies: (1) decreasing their engagement, (2) narrowing the focus of their engagement, or (3) disengaging. Although these strategies result in negative outcomes for the organization, employees’ coping leads to their positive well-being. In contrast, employees appraising positive politics perceptions as a challenge stressor use problem-focused coping, which involves increasing their engagement to reap the perceived benefits of a positive political environment. Yet, positive politics perceptions may also be appraised as a hindrance stressor in certain situations, and, therefore lead employees to apply emotion-focused coping wherein they use a disengagement strategy. By disengaging, they deal with the negative effects of politics perceptions, resulting in positive well-being. Thus, our framework suggests an unexpected twist to the stress process of politics perceptions as a strain-provoking component of employee work environments.

Details

Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Ali H. Muhammad

This paper aims to examine three sets of antecedents of organizational politics perceptions: organizational antecedents, job work context antecedents, and personal antecedents.

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1106

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine three sets of antecedents of organizational politics perceptions: organizational antecedents, job work context antecedents, and personal antecedents.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 206 full‐time Arab employees of seven Kuwaiti companies and four industries (financial services, investment, real estate, and communication).

Findings

Results of multiple regression analysis showed job/work context factors and hierarchical level to be significant predictors of perceptions of organizational politics. However, contrary to the findings of previous research, formalization and centralization did not have a significant effect on organizational politics perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

The potential for common method variance that may be associated with the use of a single source, self‐report methodology of data collection represents a limitation.

Practical implications

The study is very useful in raising the level of awareness of managers, at various levels of the organization, of the potential consequences of their political behavior to their employees.

Originality/value

This study expands such research on organizational politics in a different cultural setting, one that is characterized by lower individualism and higher power distance.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

June M. L. Poon

This study examined the moderating effect of perceived control on the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and two outcome variables: job stress and…

Abstract

This study examined the moderating effect of perceived control on the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and two outcome variables: job stress and intent to quit. Survey data from 103 employees of a company in Malaysia were analyzed using moderated multiple regression. The results showed that perceived politics had adverse effects only on employees with low perceived control. Specifically, in a work environment that is perceived to be political, employees with low levels of perceived control reported experiencing more job stress and expressed greater intention to quit their job than did employees with high levels of perceived control. Implications of the findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Sakina Abbad Al Jisr, Abdul Rahman Beydoun and Nehale Mostapha

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of one personal variable (locus of control) and two relationship variables (leader-member exchange and co-worker…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of one personal variable (locus of control) and two relationship variables (leader-member exchange and co-worker cooperation) on perceptions of organizational politics in Lebanese small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data was collected from 300 Lebanese employees from different SMEs located between Tripoli and Beirut.

Findings

Results of regression analysis indicated that all the three variables were significant predictors of perceptions of politics, and that perceptions of politics affected employee outcomes. More specifically, higher levels of politics are associated with higher turnover intention and lower job satisfaction.

Practical implications

Results of this study raise several implications for companies and employers. Perceptions of politics were found to have a negative impact on employee attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. Therefore, employers must examine the factors that affect employee perceptions of politics in the workplace. Since leader-member exchange and co-worker cooperation were found to predict politics, management's efforts should focalize on improving the relationships between employees and their supervisor as well as their relationships with each other. Management should develop strategies to create an atmosphere of cooperation and support in the organization.

Originality/value

There is paucity of studies on organizational politics in Arabic cultures. This study extends the organizational politics literature by investigating antecedents and outcomes of politics in Lebanon, a country that differs in its culture from US and European contexts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Min Wan, Suzanne Zivnuska and Matthew Valle

The purpose of this study is to explore the mediating effect of moral disengagement in the relationship between mindfulness and unethical behaviors. The authors also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the mediating effect of moral disengagement in the relationship between mindfulness and unethical behaviors. The authors also explored the moderating effect of perceptions of politics on the mediational chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors administrated time-lagged surveys at two time periods separated by six weeks. Respondents were 206 full-time employees working in the USA. Hierarchical, moderated multiple regression analyzes were used to test the mediation and moderation effects.

Findings

Results showed that mindfulness reduced destructive deviant behavior and unethical pro-organizational behavior through moral disengagement and the mediation effects were weaker when employees’ perceptions of politics were stronger.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate that mindfulness and perceptions of organizational politics combine to have profound impacts on employee unethical behaviors. Organizations seeking to minimize the occurrence of deviance and unethical behaviors may do well to support employee mindfulness and as well as minimizing organizational politics. The findings suggest that the political context has a negative impact on even the behavior of mindful employees. Therefore, building mindfulness while simultaneously reducing politics are equally important goals.

Originality/value

Our study extends the theoretical development of mindfulness research by examining the interactive effects of perceptions of organizational politics and mindfulness and broadens the theoretical rationale for explaining the linkages between mindfulness and unethical behaviors.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Osman M. Karatepe

This paper aims to propose and test a research model that investigates work engagement as a mediator of the effects of perceptions of organizational politics on affective…

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5290

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose and test a research model that investigates work engagement as a mediator of the effects of perceptions of organizational politics on affective organizational commitment, extra‐role performance, and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from a sample of 231 full‐time frontline employee‐supervisor dyads in Iran. The relationships in the model were tested using LISREL 8.30 through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results show that the fully‐mediated model provides a better fit to the data than does the partially mediated model and further indicate that work engagement acts as a full mediator of the impacts of perceptions of organizational politics on affective organizational commitment, extra‐role performance, and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

In future studies testing the effects of challenge and hindrance demands simultaneously on work engagement would be useful. Replication studies with larger sample sizes in different hospitality settings in Iran as well as other developing countries in the Middle East are in order to cross‐validate the findings.

Practical implications

Providing training programs could make employees cope with difficulties associated with other hindrance demands and their potential effects on organizational politics. In training programs employees can be motivated to speak up when they observe the root causes of organizational politics and unfair decisions in the workplace. This is important, because having a transparent work environment establishes trust between managers and employees. In addition, top management of the hotels should devise new policies and procedures that would minimize the possibility of political decisions.

Originality/value

Empirical research regarding the relationships among perceptions of organizational politics, work engagement, and hotel employee outcomes in the hospitality management and marketing literature is sparse. This study partially fills in this void by investigating the mediating role of work engagement via data obtained in the Iranian hotel industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Eran Vigoda‐Gadot, Hedva Vinarski‐Peretz and Eyal Ben‐Zion

This paper reports on two separate studies (S1, n = 169; S2, n = 224) that were designed to examine the relationship between organizational image, perceptions of workplace…

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3645

Abstract

This paper reports on two separate studies (S1, n = 169; S2, n = 224) that were designed to examine the relationship between organizational image, perceptions of workplace politics, and an additional set of job related variables (i.e. job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and job autonomy). The paper suggests that perceptions of politics have never been examined in relation to organizational image, despite the fact that both concepts are closely related to more general ideas of climate and atmosphere in and around the workplace. For this purpose, a structural equation modeling with LISREL 8.30 was used to compare three alternative models in each of the studies. Findings reveal that the first model, where perceptions of politics function as antecedents of satisfaction and commitment that have an impact on organizational image, fitted the data best. The article concludes that perceptions of politics may have an important initial impact on the formation of organizational image via other job attitudes. Relevant implications for future studies in this area are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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