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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Cathy Sherry

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the legislative creation of high rise and master planned communities to provide a common basis for future…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the legislative creation of high rise and master planned communities to provide a common basis for future discussions, research and international comparison in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study addresses relevant legislation in the Australian state of New South Wales. This has been a model for that in other jurisdictions, including Singapore, the UK and the Dubai International Financial Centre. The legal terms and their significance are discussed in a way that is comprehensible to both lawyers and non‐lawyers.

Findings

The legislation is shown to have achieved a range of outcomes that are not possible in ordinary Anglo‐Australian property law. For example, it has created governing “bodies corporate” which regulate communities with private by‐laws and facilitates the continued enforcement of detailed architectural guidelines imposing a master plan.

Research limitations/implications

The research describes the legal framework for the creation of communities in a single jurisdiction. More research is needed on the specific way that legal structures hinder or promote satisfactory community living in this and in other jurisdictions.

Originality/value

The paper will aid discussions between a range of academics and practitioners working on high rise and master planned communities. It will assist communication between lawyers and non‐lawyers, providing a clear description of the significance of legislation in the creation of communities. It will facilitate transnational discussion, as differences in legal systems and inconsistent terminology are a barrier to effective communication and common understanding.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Chris Guilding, Graham L. Bradley and Jessica Guilding

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of psychosocial need fulfillment experienced by resident strata title owners and to shed light on factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of psychosocial need fulfillment experienced by resident strata title owners and to shed light on factors that detract from residents’ lived experience in the strata title context.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview schedule that draws on theories of psychosocial need fulfillment was developed. In total, 16 home owners and three strata title managers were interviewed. Interviewees were sourced from three master planned communities located in South East Queensland, Australia.

Findings

The majority of owners reported high levels of need fulfillment and neighbourhood satisfaction. Primary sources of dissatisfaction appeared to be related to body corporate committee governance issues.

Research limitations/implications

The study's findings are subject to the widely acknowledged limitations of small sample based interview research and the study's qualitative orientation signifies that it suffers from the compromised generalisability and potential of selective and subjective reporting of observations.

Practical implications

The findings suggest a need for greater societal appreciation of factors associated with living in a strata titled community. Recommendations are provided for facilitating the transition to strata title living and reducing sources of resident dissatisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper uniquely explores residential satisfaction from a psychosocial needs perspective. There is a paucity of related research reported in the literature.

Details

Property Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Chris Mothorpe and David Wyman

The purpose of this paper is to examine the pricing of vacant lots in master planned golf course communities (GCCs) over the period of 2000-2016. The authors compare the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the pricing of vacant lots in master planned golf course communities (GCCs) over the period of 2000-2016. The authors compare the longitudinal pricing behavior of different lot types during this economic cycle and examine the causes of the property bubble and subsequent deterioration of the business model with the arrival of the Financial Economic Crisis (FEC).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors construct spatial hedonic models for three master planned GCCs in Pickens County, South Carolina and use interaction dummies to examine the pricing of different types of vacant lots before and after the FEC.

Findings

The authors find that there is a collapse in value for interior lots in the GCCs compared to interior lots in the county. As interior lots comprise over 50 percent of inventory in a typical master planned GCC, this loss of real estate value threatens the viability of such communities in the aftermath of the FEC.

Practical implications

The research results inform real estate investors, real estate developers, current homebuyers and potential homebuyers of the impacts of the FEC on master planned GCCs and some of the risks associated with such developments.

Originality/value

This is the first paper the authors are aware of that indicates the financial viability of master planned GCCs is associated with the pricing fragility of interior lots during cyclical markets. While demand for premium quality lots suffers, there is a collapse in demand for interior lots during the crisis.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Ray Green, Piyush Tiwari, Jyoti Rao and Ricki Hersburgh

The purpose of this study was to explore strategies used by developers of master-planned housing development projects in Victoria, Australia, for obtaining certification…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore strategies used by developers of master-planned housing development projects in Victoria, Australia, for obtaining certification under the Urban Development Institute of Australia’s (UDIA) EnviroDevelopment (ED) sustainable development certification programme. To be awarded ED certification, a development must demonstrate that it meets the assessment criteria within at least four of the six ED “leaves”. These leaves relate to its performance in terms of energy, water, materials, waste, community and ecosystems. This study explored how developers make choices regarding sustainability features they build into the planning, design and management of their developments to gain the leaves needed for ED certification. Having this certification is valued by developers as it can be used to demonstrate the sustainability credentials of their developments to potential house buyers, the validity of which is backed up by a trusted independent non-profit organisation (UDIA).

Design/methodology/approach

The study sought to quantify the preferential weightings of nine developers in selecting ED “leaves” and the strategies they use for meeting the assessment criteria needed to obtain selected ED leaves. This was done using a novel data collection and analysis method, the analytical hierarchical process (AHP), which relies on respondents, in this case, developers of ED certified development projects, making pairwise comparisons between choices of different development factors associated with the different ED “leaves”.

Findings

The most highly preferred ED leaves were found to be community, energy and ecosystems. “Community facilities” and “on-site transportation” were the two most highly weighted factors associated with the community leaf. Energy, the next most preferred leaf, was most highly weighted on “saving on operational costs” for the consumers (home buyers). Here consumer demand factors seem to be driving preferences. The ecology leaf was the next most preferred, with “existing site conditions” being the most highly weighted factor for this leaf. For sites that already contain significant areas of indigenous habitat, such as wetlands, selecting this leaf would seem to be an attractive, and potentially lower cost, option. Existing ecologically significant natural areas that are preserved, and where necessary enhanced, can be used for marketing purposes and serve in fulfilling planning open-space contribution requirements. The developers were more indifferent to the water, waste and materials leaves; however, the water leaf was rated slightly higher than the other two and was most strongly associated with “recycled water” and opportunities for “water conservation”, another example of demand factors driving preferences.

Originality/value

The results of this study reveal the preferences of a small sample of developers in terms of how they weigh different factors in making decisions about acquiring sustainability certification for residential master-planned development projects through the UDIA’S ED programme. The findings provide insight into the types of decisions developers make in the process of seeking ED certification, which includes considerations of site characteristics, costs, predicted effectiveness of different interventions and usefulness for marketing and other factors in terms of which ED leaves to pursue and how to acquire them to gain ED certification. The study also tested the AHP method as a methodological tool for addressing this question. Modifications in how data are collected using the on-line survey can be made to allow the method to be more easily used with larger respondent sample sizes. Collection of more focussed data elicited from respondents with specific areas of expertise, for example, specialists in energy, water, landscape architecture and planning, ecology and other relevant areas of knowledge, should also been considered.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Lucy Cradduck

The paper aims to improve consumer awareness of the complexities of community living. It does this by clarifying how living in a managed community is different from a…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to improve consumer awareness of the complexities of community living. It does this by clarifying how living in a managed community is different from a “traditional” neighbourhood; and identifying matters that can become disputes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on research by other authors into strata scheme disputes by examining recent Queensland cases.

Findings

Many disputes appear to result from a lack of understanding of the complexities of community living. Matters that should be able to be easily resolved are therefore escalated to formal disputes.

Research limitations/implications

The paper considers law and cases from Queensland. The types of matters considered, however, are relevant for any managed community and therefore the research is relevant for all jurisdictions. The research will be of particular interest to jurisdictions looking to boost living density by increasing the development of managed communities.

Practical implications

The research will assist in consumer transactions by providing guidance as to the matters to be considering prior to moving into a managed community. More informed decision making by prospective residents will lead to a decreased likelihood of disputes arising.

Originality/value

The paper is an up‐to‐date consideration of the issues arising from community living. It highlights the benefits arising from increased consumer awareness of the complexities of community living and the potential for consumer education to reduce the number of disputes.

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Sacha Reid

This exploratory research paper aims to examine the social interactions within multi-owned properties (MOPs) in suburban Brisbane, Australia, and the influences these have…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory research paper aims to examine the social interactions within multi-owned properties (MOPs) in suburban Brisbane, Australia, and the influences these have on “sense of community” (SOC).

Design/methodology/approach

A constructivist grounded theory research approach is adopted, utilising qualitative research methods of 17 in-depth interviews across four suburbs.

Findings

Respondents of this research do know others within their MOP, although these are surface-level social interactions rather than deep social ties. Social interactions are influenced by concerns for privacy, resident homogeneity, tenure type and the safety and security of the built environment. A disconnect exists between marketing and reality when respondents discuss an SOC. Development of an SOC is also constrained by the strata and community title legislation that enables MOPs ' existence. Self-governance measures exclude the majority of MOP residents from engaging in community participation, through bodies ' corporate and decision-making practices.

Research limitations/implications

The research design limited external validity to other groups and settings. It was also challenging accessing residents and MOP owners for inclusion in this research.

Originality/value

The research is significant in addressing the knowledge gap of social relations within MOPs. MOPs will be a key driver for the development industry in coming decades, so it is important to understand the lived experience of residents to ensure a liveable and sustainable residential product for the future.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Ainur Zaireen Zainudin and Khadijah Hussin

– The purpose of this paper is to discover the operational character of gated communities in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discover the operational character of gated communities in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a small case study conducted in Iskandar Malaysia, an economic development region located in the southern part of Peninsular Malaysia. In the case study, 12 housing developers were interviewed, involving 32 gated communities altogether. The investigation covered the identification of the governing document used in operating a gated community, the operational purposes and scopes, the arrangement for collection of maintenance fee, and the internal governance within the gated communities.

Findings

From the analysis, it was found that two types of gated communities exist in the case study areas, namely the strata gated community scheme, and the gated community scheme (GACOS). The operational mechanism for the former is through a set of rules enforced by the government. Meanwhile, the latter is based on the arrangement set up either by the developer, where legal agreement is applicable, or through the consensus among homeowners. However, despite these differences, both mechanisms share the same intention, that is to operate the gated community based on cooperative-collective sharing arrangement.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the vulnerability of GACOS enclosure components, the case study revealed that the number of GACOS is still bigger than the strata gated community scheme. Since this perspective is lacking in this paper, it is suggested that more studies are conducted to explain the reasons behind the indicated phenomenon.

Originality/value

The most important contribution of the paper is to highlight the importance of gating experience that is heavily influenced by the local policy setting to determine the survival of a gated community; thus, demonstrating how different they are from each other.

Details

Property Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

M. Kozlowski and S. Huston

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact of urban design master plan projects in the Australian context of Brisbane. It first reviewed the general ramifications…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact of urban design master plan projects in the Australian context of Brisbane. It first reviewed the general ramifications of urban design projects on property markets. The local impacts of two major projects were then analysed and compared. A limited statistical analysis was conducted to investigate whether local price growth could be attributed to the projects or resulted from generally buoyant market conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a largely descriptive approach. It first reviewed the theoretical outcomes urban design projects should deliver. It then looked at the specific details of two distinct urban design projects in Brisbane and descriptively assessed their impact on adjacent local housing markets. It then compared relative aggregated location price growth to isolate discernable project price effects. Finally, the paper anecdotally selected some master designed properties and considered whether their prices were excessive compared to average location rents.

Findings

The paper found conflicting evidence to support the view that urban design projects significantly lifted aggregated location prices. On the one hand, aggregated project location price growth was relatively muted. Other generic demand factors and local differences in housing stock quality swamped project effects. On the other hand, at the individual property level, there was some anecdotal evidence to suggest premiums were paid for urban designed homes. The paper indirectly suggests, then, that any price impacts of urban design projects are subject to rapid distance decay.

Research limitations/implications

The paper conducted only a limited historical review of revitalisation and urban design. A systematic individual, project‐adjacent, property price analysis was not conducted. Rather, the aggregated dwelling price analysis and anecdotal rental review suggested, albeit inconclusively, that the effects of urban design are spatially restricted to the immediate vicinity of projects.

Practical implications

Investors should note likely price impact of planned infrastructure projects is spatially restricted to the immediate environs of the project.

Originality/value

The paper combines an overview of urban design and property market analysis.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2015

Xu Yuhui, Liang Chengcheng and Wu Yue

To solve several “inorganic” problems generated recently by community development in China (e.g., waste of social resources, environmental pollution, and decreased…

Abstract

To solve several “inorganic” problems generated recently by community development in China (e.g., waste of social resources, environmental pollution, and decreased economic energy efficiency), focus should be on improving the community traffic organic micro-circulation system. As a historic and mixed functional urban community, the micro-circulation system of Xi'an Railway Bureau exhibits representativeness and complexity. Based on existing research results and years of follow-up investigations, which concentrate on circulation patterns and inherent organic development requirements of the community traffic micro-circulation system, this paper builds an evaluation index system. Value function method was used to implement the index factor quantitative analysis and comprehensive evaluation. Several related strategies were proposed to improve the organic micro-circulation system of the community, which is based on the analysis of the evaluation, in order to adopt the trend in both increasing urban development and stock updating. The analysis results demonstrate that it is necessary to present guiding renewal strategies on community land, road, people, and the environment for those mixed functional communities which use progressive renewed mode. It compensates the problems of overly strong export-oriented system, which is caused by the lack of organic traffic micro-circulation, so as to achieve the selective opening of community external. The study mainly highlights the significance of the systematic analysis of evaluation in influencing strategies on community renewal.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2017

James Thurmond and Robert Yehl

For a good part of the U.S. system of federalism municipal incorporation has been the formal structure for local communities. Over the last 60 years there has been a shift…

Abstract

For a good part of the U.S. system of federalism municipal incorporation has been the formal structure for local communities. Over the last 60 years there has been a shift in this structure to special district government. The Woodlands, Texas presents an interesting case study on the incremental development of a former New Town community, the change in formal government organization and the potential for a different model of local governance structure in the 21st Century. The authors explore the four stages of development for The Woodlands over the past 40 years and assess this development through several model theories including institutional, urban regime, and urban governance. Contrary to some current literature on governance, The Woodlands appears to have transitioned from decentralization to more centralization while at the same time avoiding full incorporation as a municipality. It may be indicative of the new governance.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory and Behavior, vol. 20 no. 03
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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