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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Monica Ngo

In 1984, when a Government committee under the chairmanship of Mr E. G. Nugee QC was set up to look into the problems of management of privately owned blocks of flats (see…

Abstract

In 1984, when a Government committee under the chairmanship of Mr E. G. Nugee QC was set up to look into the problems of management of privately owned blocks of flats (see Property Management Vol 5 No 2), both the National Consumer Council and the Building Societies Association, in their findings submitted to the committee, advocated the adoption of the Australian strata title system to replace the long leasehold. More recently, the Law Commission has called for the creation of a ‘commonhold’ system of ownership similar to the condominium concept in the United States and the strata title system in Australia. This paper presents the concept of strata titles as a system of flat ownership and management. The term ‘flat’ here is not confined to that for residential occupation but has a wider application extending to ‘airspace’. The paper examines the formation of a strata scheme, the legal and planning implications of ownership and, finally, the framework of operation.

Details

Property Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Alice Christudason

In the face of Singapore's land scarcity problem, there is an increasing prevalence of stratatitled developments providing private housing in Singapore. This paper…

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Abstract

In the face of Singapore's land scarcity problem, there is an increasing prevalence of stratatitled developments providing private housing in Singapore. This paper considers the awareness in certain quarters of certain fundamental aspects of this unique form of property ownership. The particular aspect which this paper considers is the understanding and interpretation of the term “common property” among two important groups of people. The first group comprises those who purchase strata title properties – they are referred to as “subsidiary proprietors”. The second group comprises “managing agents” (MAs), who may be delegated this task of professionally managing and maintaining the stratatitled development. The findings of a survey are that their understanding of this fundamental term is inadequate. Based on these findings, the paper concludes with recommendations for improving the level of professionalism among MAs through licensing and courses for continuing professional development. This will bode well for the overall state of stratatitled developments which are not only here to stay, but are expected to increase in number in Singapore.

Details

Property Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Chris Guilding, Graham L. Bradley and Jessica Guilding

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of psychosocial need fulfillment experienced by resident strata title owners and to shed light on factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of psychosocial need fulfillment experienced by resident strata title owners and to shed light on factors that detract from residents’ lived experience in the strata title context.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview schedule that draws on theories of psychosocial need fulfillment was developed. In total, 16 home owners and three strata title managers were interviewed. Interviewees were sourced from three master planned communities located in South East Queensland, Australia.

Findings

The majority of owners reported high levels of need fulfillment and neighbourhood satisfaction. Primary sources of dissatisfaction appeared to be related to body corporate committee governance issues.

Research limitations/implications

The study's findings are subject to the widely acknowledged limitations of small sample based interview research and the study's qualitative orientation signifies that it suffers from the compromised generalisability and potential of selective and subjective reporting of observations.

Practical implications

The findings suggest a need for greater societal appreciation of factors associated with living in a strata titled community. Recommendations are provided for facilitating the transition to strata title living and reducing sources of resident dissatisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper uniquely explores residential satisfaction from a psychosocial needs perspective. There is a paucity of related research reported in the literature.

Details

Property Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Alice Christudason

From 1967, responsibility for the maintenance and management of common property in strata developments in Singapore was borne by single‐tier management corporations…

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Abstract

Purpose

From 1967, responsibility for the maintenance and management of common property in strata developments in Singapore was borne by single‐tier management corporations. However from 2005, through the concepts of multi‐tier management corporations and limited common property, new legislation made sweeping changes to the way in which common property can be managed. This paper aims to discuss the present situation

Design/methodology/approach

First, the problems inherent in the existing system of single‐tier management corporations for strata property management until 2005 are examined. This provides a backdrop for a discussion of the solutions presented by new legislation in the form of “two/multi‐tier” management corporations.

Findings

The study reveals that while the multi‐tier system could alleviate some of the problems existing under the single‐tier management corporation system, other problems could arise; these include increased operational costs, finding sufficient volunteers for the multi‐tier management corporations, and increased potential for conflict.

Practical implications

There are practical implications for various parties including subsidiary proprietors, management corporations, developers and managing agents. Developers and property owners now have certain flexibilities that were not available under the single‐tier system. Evaluation of the potential problems can result in greater efficiency and cost savings.

Originality/value

While this paper is of general interest to all types of strata developments, it is of particular relevance to mixed‐use developments, which may benefit from multi‐tier management corporations. The paper draws on the experiences of other jurisdictions, which have implemented similar systems and introduced measures to minimize some potential problems.

Details

Property Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Alice Christudason

This study aims to enlighten strata property owners about the importance of choosing the appropriate vehicle for the management of the common property in their strata development.

3428

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to enlighten strata property owners about the importance of choosing the appropriate vehicle for the management of the common property in their strata development.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology employed for this inquiry is a case study of two residential stratatitled properties. The two were selected on the basis that, although they share certain similar characteristics including age, tenure and locational attributes, each employs different systems of property management. Data were gathered mainly through interviews with the Property Managers and Chairs of the Management Council. Interviews were also carried out with professionals in the real estate industry specializing in property and facilities management.

Findings

The study reveals the various factors of which Management Corporations should be mindful when deciding what form of property management vehicle to use. Careful consideration of these factors will result in a decision that not only is cost‐effective, but also provides greater efficiency in the management and maintenance of the strata titled development.

Practical implications

Careful consideration of the factors revealed in the findings can result in a decision by the Management Corporation, which is cost‐effective. Evaluation of the factors will also result in greater efficiency in the management and maintenance of common property in the strata titled development.

Originality/value

This is an up‐to‐date comparison of two property management systems available to strata developments, in the context of the Singapore Land Titles (Strata) Act, which is based on New South Wales' legislation. The information is useful for strata owners and Management Councils in other jurisdictions in that it provides pointers on the choice of a property management system.

Details

Property Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Spence Marlow and Sue Rivers

Provides some background to new proposals in the UK to introducelegislation which would give existing long leaseholders ininterdependent properties the collective right to…

Abstract

Provides some background to new proposals in the UK to introduce legislation which would give existing long leaseholders in interdependent properties the collective right to purchase the freehold interest. Sets out to examine the management structure of commonhold properties, with particular emphasis on the dynamics of collective management, in three countries where it is well established: Australia, France and the USA.

Details

Property Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2020

Iris Levin and Kathy Arthurson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the causes, the nature and the extent of unneighbourly relations between neighbours living in small multi-owned residential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the causes, the nature and the extent of unneighbourly relations between neighbours living in small multi-owned residential buildings (MOBs, sometimes called strata) in Australian cities, and the effect of these relations on the health and wellbeing of residents. The impact of neighbour relations and conflicts on residents' health and wellbeing has not been explored before in the context of small MOBs in Australia (under 12 units).

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved an analysis of secondary data on common problems experienced in MOBs between neighbours, in-depth face-to-face interviews with twenty-six residents and interviews with five managers of management agencies in metropolitan Melbourne (Victoria) and Adelaide (South Australia), Australia.

Findings

When strata processes and management worked well residents were positive about living in such an arrangement. However, when the strata group was less harmonious residents reported that it impacted negatively on their health and wellbeing.

Research limitations/implications

The study's findings are subject to the widely acknowledged limitations of small sample-based interview research. Findings indicate that there is a need to explore the benefits and disadvantages of living in small multi-owned residential buildings in Australia on a larger scale.

Practical implications

There are three policy implications from the findings: a need for better education of prospective buyers regarding the nature of strata living; tighter regulation of rules for small multi-owned apartment buildings is required, (in a similar way to how the regulations operate in large apartment buildings); and a need to include private rental tenants living in strata in the everyday life around the management of the building.

Originality/value

The impact of neighbourly relations and conflicts on the health and wellbeing of residents living in MOBs, particularly small ones, has not been studied adequately, as current research focuses on large apartment buildings. This research addresses a gap in the literature in the study of small living arrangements (town houses, apartment buildings, terraces), with 12 or less apartments, with a focus on residents' health and wellbeing.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Cathy Sherry

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the legislative creation of high rise and master planned communities to provide a common basis for future…

1166

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the legislative creation of high rise and master planned communities to provide a common basis for future discussions, research and international comparison in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study addresses relevant legislation in the Australian state of New South Wales. This has been a model for that in other jurisdictions, including Singapore, the UK and the Dubai International Financial Centre. The legal terms and their significance are discussed in a way that is comprehensible to both lawyers and non‐lawyers.

Findings

The legislation is shown to have achieved a range of outcomes that are not possible in ordinary Anglo‐Australian property law. For example, it has created governing “bodies corporate” which regulate communities with private by‐laws and facilitates the continued enforcement of detailed architectural guidelines imposing a master plan.

Research limitations/implications

The research describes the legal framework for the creation of communities in a single jurisdiction. More research is needed on the specific way that legal structures hinder or promote satisfactory community living in this and in other jurisdictions.

Originality/value

The paper will aid discussions between a range of academics and practitioners working on high rise and master planned communities. It will assist communication between lawyers and non‐lawyers, providing a clear description of the significance of legislation in the creation of communities. It will facilitate transnational discussion, as differences in legal systems and inconsistent terminology are a barrier to effective communication and common understanding.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Lan Yuan Lim

The sale of a strata titled development collectively by individual owners is a unique experience in Singapore's real estate industry. This collective sale process is…

742

Abstract

Purpose

The sale of a strata titled development collectively by individual owners is a unique experience in Singapore's real estate industry. This collective sale process is legislated by law, which allows dilapidated developments to be redeveloped to take advantage of the site potential. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the nature of strata titled developments, the collective sale process and the various valuation issues encountered.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is adopted to illustrate the mechanics and the difficulties involved in the collective sale process. The different methods of valuation used to arrive at a fair distribution of the sale proceeds are illustrated.

Findings

The study reveals the appropriate methods of distribution of sales proceeds to be used under different circumstances. A few managerial implications arise from the study. These include the need to adopt a fair and reasonable attitude when approaching collective sales and to be in touch with the property market and the target market in order to arrive at a reasonable distribution method of the sale proceeds in order to satisfy the various stakeholders in the development.

Originality/value

The study provides an overall framework on how future collective sales in Singapore can be successfully conducted.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Kelly Cassidy and Chris Guilding

The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of the organisational forms comprising the Australian condominium tourism accommodation sector.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of the organisational forms comprising the Australian condominium tourism accommodation sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 34 exploratory interviews were conducted with interviewees representing a cross‐section of interests in condominium tourism accommodation operations.

Findings

An original hierarchical typology is developed. The structuring criteria employed for the hierarchy include: whether a condominium complex is in a hotel or apartment complex, whether it is branded and whether the condominiums are serviced.

Research limitations/implications

The findings reported will greatly advance the capacity to provide a meaningful commentary on the nature of condominium tourism accommodation complexes and to understand key issues associated with different forms of condominium tourism accommodation services provided.

Practical limitations

The study suffers from the normal limitations associated with the subjective interpretation of qualitative data. In addition, the fast evolving nature of the condominium tourism accommodation sector signifies that the typology advanced should be viewed as somewhat time‐specific.

Originality/value

Despite the huge growth in condominium‐based tourism accommodation worldwide, there has been a scarcity of research directed to the phenomenon. The study can thus be seen to be highly original.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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