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1 – 10 of 963
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Chris Guilding, Graham L. Bradley and Jessica Guilding

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of psychosocial need fulfillment experienced by resident strata title owners and to shed light on factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and extent of psychosocial need fulfillment experienced by resident strata title owners and to shed light on factors that detract from residents’ lived experience in the strata title context.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview schedule that draws on theories of psychosocial need fulfillment was developed. In total, 16 home owners and three strata title managers were interviewed. Interviewees were sourced from three master planned communities located in South East Queensland, Australia.

Findings

The majority of owners reported high levels of need fulfillment and neighbourhood satisfaction. Primary sources of dissatisfaction appeared to be related to body corporate committee governance issues.

Research limitations/implications

The study's findings are subject to the widely acknowledged limitations of small sample based interview research and the study's qualitative orientation signifies that it suffers from the compromised generalisability and potential of selective and subjective reporting of observations.

Practical implications

The findings suggest a need for greater societal appreciation of factors associated with living in a strata titled community. Recommendations are provided for facilitating the transition to strata title living and reducing sources of resident dissatisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper uniquely explores residential satisfaction from a psychosocial needs perspective. There is a paucity of related research reported in the literature.

Details

Property Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Graham L. Bradley, Janet R. McColl-Kennedy, Beverley A. Sparks, Nerina L. Jimmieson and Dieter Zapf

Interactions between customers and service providers are ubiquitous. Some of these encounters are routine, but many are characterized by conflict and intense emotions…

Abstract

Interactions between customers and service providers are ubiquitous. Some of these encounters are routine, but many are characterized by conflict and intense emotions. This chapter introduces a new theory, service encounter needs theory (SENT) that aims to elucidate the mechanisms through which service encounter behaviors affect outcomes for customers and employees. Evidence is presented for the preeminence within these encounters of eight psychosocial needs, and propositions are advanced regarding likely antecedents to fulfillment and violation of these needs. Emotional experiences and displays are viewed as important consequences of need fulfillment and violation, as are numerous cognitive, behavioral, and health-related outcomes.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Dynamism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-177-1

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Sarlaksha Ganesh and Mangadu Paramasivam Ganesh

The purpose of this paper was to attempt to understand the effects of gender, masculinity-femininity and social support from three sources (supervisor, co-worker and…

3872

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to attempt to understand the effects of gender, masculinity-femininity and social support from three sources (supervisor, co-worker and family) on the quality of work life (QWL) of an employee. In addition, the paper tried to explore the moderating effects of gender and social support in the relationship between masculinity-femininity and QWL. Relevant background variables such as age, marital status, parental status and sector have been included as control variables in the study.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 307 bank employees in India (208 males and 99 females) working in private and public sector banks using the purposive sampling technique. Prior permission was obtained from the relevant authorities. To test the hypotheses, t-tests and hierarchical regression analyses were performed. In addition, the Baron and Kenny (1986) approach was used to test the moderating effects of gender and social support in the relationship between masculinity-femininity and QWL.

Findings

Masculinity-femininity was not found to be significant predictor of QWL, while gender emerged as a significant predictor of QWL. Also, gender moderated the relationship between masculinity-femininity and QWL. All three sources of social support significantly predicted QWL. Results of t-test showed that female employees experienced better QWL than male employees. Furthermore, supervisory category employees and parent employees reported significantly better QWL than non-supervisory and non-parent employees.

Practical implications

The key implication for organisations is that employees with both masculine and feminine tendencies are required to strike a balance between goal orientation and people orientation within the company. Also, employees should understand that their gender as well as their individual orientations towards masculinity or femininity will affect the dynamics of any interaction. Hence, being aware of the tendencies that are typical of their gender role orientations both while dealing with themselves as well as while dealing with customers, colleagues or supervisors would help in improving the quality of their work, as well as their QWL, especially in customer service professions.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that have tried to answer the “why” part of gender differences in QWL. In addition, this study contributes to an understanding of the relative importance of different sources of social support in improving an employee's QWL. Finally, this is the first study to understand the relationship between masculinity-femininity, social support, gender and QWL in the Indian context, where the overall cultural orientation towards gender roles is currently changing.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2022

Ekta Duggal and Harsh Vardhan Verma

Research studies have attributed customer shift from offline to online retail to primarily functional reasons. Indian retailing differs from western counterparts in terms…

Abstract

Purpose

Research studies have attributed customer shift from offline to online retail to primarily functional reasons. Indian retailing differs from western counterparts in terms of structure and socio-cultural-historical-economic context. The purpose of this paper is to find whether this shift is instigated by positive or negative drive.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through group discussions and reflective experiential accounts in the form of text. The textual material was thematically analyzed to develop thematic networks. By this method, the text’s patent structures were explored, and underlying hidden patterns were identified.

Findings

Two global themes of “volition” and “violation” were discovered. At the patent level, customers are attracted to online in volition as it allows them to move to higher or desired value space. However, at the deeper level, customer shifted to online as a means to escape from violations involved in human-to-human dealings with offline retailers.

Practical implications

The way forward for offline retailers is to build their advantage based on human interactions. The salvation of offline retailing does not lie in trying to beat online retailers on their position of strength but in leveraging interactions to build social capital.

Originality/value

This study sought to explore and apprehend the meaning of customer shift from offline to online retail at deeper psycho-socio-cultural level.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Alexander P. Henkel, Martina Čaić, Marah Blaurock and Mehmet Okan

Besides the direct physical health consequences, through social isolation COVID-19 affects a considerably larger share of consumers with deleterious effects for their…

9516

Abstract

Purpose

Besides the direct physical health consequences, through social isolation COVID-19 affects a considerably larger share of consumers with deleterious effects for their psychological well-being. Two vulnerable consumer groups are particularly affected: older adults and children. The purpose of the underlying paper is to take a transformative research perspective on how social robots can be deployed for advancing the well-being of these vulnerable consumers and to spur robotic transformative service research (RTSR).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper follows a conceptual approach that integrates findings from various domains: service research, social robotics, social psychology and medicine.

Findings

Two key findings advanced in this paper are (1) a typology of robotic transformative service (i.e. entertainer, social enabler, mentor and friend) as a function of consumers' state of social isolation, well-being focus and robot capabilities and (2) a future research agenda for RTSR.

Practical implications

This paper guides service consumers and providers and robot developers in identifying and developing the most appropriate social robot type for advancing the well-being of vulnerable consumers in social isolation.

Originality/value

This study is the first to integrate social robotics and transformative service research by developing a typology of social robots as a guiding framework for assessing the status quo of transformative robotic service on the basis of which it advances a future research agenda for RTSR. It further complements the underdeveloped body of service research with a focus on eudaimonic consumer well-being.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Melinde Coetzee and Marais Salemon Bester

The purpose of this paper is to explore the association of harmonious work passion with career satisfaction, while probing the mediating role of employees’ psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the association of harmonious work passion with career satisfaction, while probing the mediating role of employees’ psychological career resources and career preoccupations as important psychosocial career mechanisms in this association.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a cross-sectional quantitative study comprising a sample of (n = 550) employees in various South African organisations.

Findings

The current study found that individuals’ career preferences, career drivers, career harmonisers and career adaptation preoccupations are dynamic mechanisms that regulate the link between harmonious passion and career satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The study is located in South Africa and was cross-sectional in design. Generalisation to other occupational contexts and establishing cause-effect relations were not possible.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates the usefulness of harmonious work passion as an additional positive psychological construct in understanding the psychosocial motivational career mechanisms that drive employees’ career satisfaction. The mediating role of certain psychological career resources (i.e. flexible career preferences, career drivers and career harmonisers) and career adaptation preoccupations in the link between employees’ harmonious passion and career satisfaction need to be considered in career management support practices.

Social implications

This paper demonstrates the growing need to better understand the psychosocial mechanisms that influence employees’ career satisfaction.

Originality/value

The study contributed new insights that extend theory and research on the harmonious work passion phenomenon in relation to important career constructs in the work-career context by means of self-determination theory.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Jørn Hetland, Hilde Hetland, Arnold B. Bakker, Evangelia Demerouti, Cecilie S. Andreassen and Ståle Pallesen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible mediating role of need fulfilment in the relationship between transformational leadership and employee job attitudes…

1996

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible mediating role of need fulfilment in the relationship between transformational leadership and employee job attitudes (job satisfaction and dedication).

Design/methodology/approach

The two samples include both cross-sectional and diary data. The cross-sectional sample (sample 1) consisted of 661 employees from various organizations. In the diary study (sample 2), 65 employees completed a daily questionnaire on five consecutive working days, yielding 325 measurement points in total. The authors analyzed the data using structural equation modeling (Mplus 5) and multilevel analyses (MLwiN 2.20).

Findings

As hypothesized, support for full mediation of the relationship between transformational leadership and positive job attitudes through the fulfilment of psychological needs were found both on a general level and on a daily basis.

Originality/value

The paper is based on a multi study approach and empirically addresses the link between transformational leadership and positive job attitudes, and the role of basic need fulfilment in this relationship on both a general and daily level.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Osman M. Karatepe and Rashin Kaviti

This paper aims to propose and test a conceptual model, guided by conservation of resources theory, that examines whether emotional exhaustion is a mediator between…

1006

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose and test a conceptual model, guided by conservation of resources theory, that examines whether emotional exhaustion is a mediator between organization mission fulfillment and critical outcomes such as turnover intentions, lateness attitude, job performance and extra-role customer service.

Design/methodology/approach

The aforesaid relationships were assessed via data gathered from customer-contact employees two weeks apart in three waves and their immediate supervisors in the international five-star chain hotels in Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. The relationships in the model were gauged via structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results reveal that organization mission fulfillment influences the above-mentioned outcomes only through emotional exhaustion. Specifically, organization mission fulfillment mitigates customer-contact employees’ emotional exhaustion. Under these circumstances, these employees report desirable outcomes such as low levels of quitting intentions and lateness attitude as well as higher in- and extra-role performances.

Research limitations/implications

In future research, collecting data from different service settings in different countries would enable the researcher to conduct a cross-national study and make further generalizations. In future research, including actual turnover and absenteeism as well creative and service recovery performances in the model would enrich the understanding about the outcomes of organization mission fulfillment and emotional exhaustion.

Practical implications

Management needs to use several intra-organizational communication tools so that customer-contact employees can have an understanding of how the organization is trying to accomplish its mission. When employees participate in and contribute to the preparation of the organization’s mission statement, they own the mission statement and do their best to achieve the organizational objectives. Management should also offer a work environment where employees can avail themselves of psychosocial support to be provided by mentors. Such psychosocial support would enable employees to manage problems emerging from emotional exhaustion.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to current knowledge by testing the effect of the organization’s fidelity to its mission statement on emotional exhaustion and the above-mentioned job outcomes using data obtained from employees in frontline service jobs in the hotel industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Jonathan Houdmont, Robert Kerr and Raymond Randall

There is a paucity of contemporary evidence on the organisational (as opposed to operational) psychosocial hazard (OPH) exposures of UK police officers. The purpose of…

1325

Abstract

Purpose

There is a paucity of contemporary evidence on the organisational (as opposed to operational) psychosocial hazard (OPH) exposures of UK police officers. The purpose of this study is to report on OPH exposures measured via an instrument developed by the UK government – the management standards indicator tool – among police officers sampled from an entire UK force. The study seeks to provide reference values for UK police officers' OPH exposures, to consider these in relation to government exposure targets, and to examine the association between officers' OPH exposures and perceived work‐related stress.

Design/methodology/approach

Police officers (n=1,729) completed the management standards indicator tool which measures perceived exposure to seven psychosocial work environment dimensions: demands, control, managerial support, peer support, relationships, role, and change. In addition, a single‐item measure of perceived work‐related stress was applied.

Findings

Sector‐specific reference values were generated by job role and rank on each of the seven dimensions assessed by the indicator tool. Scores on all seven dimensions were below government target levels (indicating that scores fell below the 80th percentile in relation to benchmark data). In total, 46 per cent of police officers reported their work to be very or extremely stressful. A significant positive correlation (p <0.01) was found between scores on each of the seven psychosocial work characteristics and perceived work‐related stress.

Originality/value

This study is the first to report on the assessment of UK police officers' OPH exposure using the management standards indicator tool. It provides reference values that UK forces will find useful for benchmarking and intervention‐targeting purposes, and against which progress in reducing OPH exposures can be assessed.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Jonathan Houdmont

Stress research in the UK policing has largely neglected to account for variance in the type of psychosocial hazard officers are exposed to across policing roles…

1328

Abstract

Purpose

Stress research in the UK policing has largely neglected to account for variance in the type of psychosocial hazard officers are exposed to across policing roles, highlighting the need for role‐specific research that is capable of informing similarly specific stress reduction interventions. This study aimed to develop and assess exposure to a taxonomy of psychosocial hazards specific to the UK police custody work, consider the burnout profile of custody officers, explore relations between psychosocial hazard exposure and burnout, and compare the exposures of burned out and non‐burned out custody officers.

Design/methodology/approach

Preliminary focus groups identified a series of psychosocial hazards specific to the custody officer role. A questionnaire administered to custody officers within a UK territorial police force assessed exposure to these psychosocial hazards and burnout.

Findings

Twenty‐six custody‐specific psychosocial hazards were identified, across nine themes. The proportion of custody officers who reported a high degree of burnout was above that found in normative data. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that exposures were positively related to emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Unrelated t‐tests showed that respondents who reported high burnout also reported significantly higher exposures across all nine psychosocial hazard themes than those with sub‐threshold burnout scores.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the stress‐related working conditions of the UK custody officers. It provides a foundation for future large‐scale longitudinal studies concerned with validating the current findings and improving the health of officers engaged in this unique policing role.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 963