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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2021

Julian de Meyrick and Farhat Yusuf

The purpose of this study is to identify correlates of tobacco smoking behaviour across various socio-demographic segments of the Australian population.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify correlates of tobacco smoking behaviour across various socio-demographic segments of the Australian population.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from two nationally representative, probability samples of persons 18 and over, surveyed by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in 2001 and 2017–2018 were analysed using multinomial logistic regression.

Findings

Overall, the prevalence of current smokers declined from 24.3 to 15%. More than half of the population had never smoked. The prevalence of ex-smokers increased slightly to 30%. Prevalence of current smoking was higher among older age groups and among those with lower educational achievement, lower income, living in a disadvantaged area and experiencing increasing stress. Females were more likely than males to be never-smokers. Males were more likely than females to be current smokers.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on two cross-sectional surveys conducted 17 years apart. It is not possible to draw any conclusions about the actual trajectories of the changes in the values reported or any correlations between those trajectories. Nor is it possible to make any meaningful forecasts about likely future trends in smoking status in these various segments based on these data sets. The classifications used in the surveys generate some heterogeneous groups, which can obscure important differences among respondents within groups. Data are all self-reported, and there is no validation of the self-reported smoking status. This might lead to under-reporting, especially in a community where tobacco smoking is no longer a majority or even a popular habit. Because the surveys are so large, virtually, all the findings are statistically significant. However, the increasing preponderance of never-smokers in many categories might mean that never-smokers could come to dominate the data.

Practical implications

The findings from this paper will help tobacco-control policy-makers to augment whole-of-community initiatives with individual campaigns designed to be more effective with particular socio-demographic segments. They will also assist in ensuring better alignment between initiatives addressing mental health and tobacco smoking problems facing the community.

Originality/value

The examination of smoking behaviour among individual population sub-groups, chosen by the authors, is commonplace in the literature. This paper uses data from two large surveys to model the whole, heterogeneous population, measured at two different points in time.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Julian de Meyrick

Tobacco smoking will kill literally millions of people annually around the world. Despite this fact, prevalence among young people remains unacceptably high. Because tobacco is so…

3097

Abstract

Tobacco smoking will kill literally millions of people annually around the world. Despite this fact, prevalence among young people remains unacceptably high. Because tobacco is so addictive, the typical adolescent smoker can look forward to a lifetime addiction, reduced quality of life and premature death. A long‐term solution to this problem must include action to postpone or inhibit adolescents from taking up smoking. Advertising research indicates that a message is more effective if the target audience experiences a feeling of involvement in it. It must also communicate new, important information that engages the audience at a cognitive and affective level and is readily verifiable against the audience’s own experience. It follows that the threat of addiction should be used as the key message in a campaign to reduce the incidence of adolescent cigarette smoking. This threat is potentially salient for adolescents. It is concrete and immediate, not merely a promise of increased statistical probabilities 30 or more years into the future. It is also readily verifiable from the adolescent’s own experience. It may also be worth focusing on other consequent losses that flow from the addiction.

Details

Health Education, vol. 101 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Julian de Meyrick

The Delphi method is well suited to the research needed to inform health education and health promotion campaigns. This paper measures the current interest in the method by way of…

6939

Abstract

The Delphi method is well suited to the research needed to inform health education and health promotion campaigns. This paper measures the current interest in the method by way of a literature review. It then describes how the method has evolved from its inception in the 1950s, to its current form. The focus is on a Delphi variant that is particularly relevant to health education – the Policy Delphi. The benefits of the method for the developer of health education and health promotion campaigns are then discussed. The main benefits relate to the gaining of expert opinions without the time and geographical restraints involved in alternative methods. The anonymity that is central to the Delphi method also has benefits for the researcher. The last section of the paper deals with potential pitfalls in the Delphi method that might undermine the successful application of the method, and recommends steps the practitioner can take to address these pitfalls.

Details

Health Education, vol. 103 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Julian Meyrick and Tully Barnett

In this chapter, we consider dominant arguments for the ‘disaggregation’ of the value of culture into discrete dimensions – economic, social, environmental, heritage and cultural…

Abstract

In this chapter, we consider dominant arguments for the ‘disaggregation’ of the value of culture into discrete dimensions – economic, social, environmental, heritage and cultural and so forth – and their separate measurement. We discuss the role of proxies in assessment processes (‘parts’) and their relationship to the cultural experiences (‘wholes’) for which they are taken to be representative indicators. Disaggregation encourages a divisible approach to cultural activities that, at their heart, present as non-divisible experiences. Thus, we should speak of ‘culture's value’ as opposed to ‘cultural value’ as a way of highlighting a crucial methodological point – that arts and culture are more than the sum of their parts and that the assessment of a particular cultural activity must consider not only the benefits returned by its separate dimensions but also the activity's overall purpose, scope and place in the world. These non-divisible, often non-measurable, contextual features should not be considered contingent externalities but as sense-providing parameters that give meaning to any numerical data whatsoever. We conclude by looking at the issue via an example of a recent stage play from South Australia, Mi:Wi 3027 written by Ngarrindjeri playwright Glenn Shea and commissioned by Country Arts South Australia. The values of the drama cannot be and should not be distinguished from its value, and assessment processes must therefore look to frame the primary cultural experience it embodies in ways that make sense of its purpose, scope and place in the world.

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Julian Meyrick

The purpose of this paper is to argue for the importance of separating out three key dimensions of culture’s value – definition, measurement and cultural reporting. This has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue for the importance of separating out three key dimensions of culture’s value – definition, measurement and cultural reporting. This has implications for the balance between quantitative and qualitative methodologies in achieving a meaningful context for interpreting numbers-based cultural data, as well as for the management of reporting regimes – the process by which value is “conferred” – by individual cultural organisations and events. It concludes with a brief sketch of a new set of priorities for assessment processes based on a less unitized, more cooperative understanding of cultural value (a Total Cultural Value exercise)

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a keynote address from the Global Events Congress.

Findings

Valuation processes are comparative processes. They involve benchmarking, standardisation, unitisation and ranking. Cultural activities have an incommensurable aspect that makes them resist this kind of assessment and not infrequently make a nonsense of it. This makes it difficult for policy makers to choose between them from a resource perspective. No new proof of worth is going to change this fundamental characteristic of culture. A Total Cultural Value exercise is “allocutionary” and helps cultural programmes “make a case” based on best use of the available data and a meta-cognitive appreciation of the biases different proofs of worth involve.

Originality/value

Total Cultural Value is a new concept developed to bring quantitative and qualitative methods for valuing arts and culture together

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Julian Meyrick and Tully Barnett

4192

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Jodie George

Within Australia, cultural festivals focusing on music, food and art represent important social and economic opportunities for rural communities. However, tensions may also arise…

2428

Abstract

Purpose

Within Australia, cultural festivals focusing on music, food and art represent important social and economic opportunities for rural communities. However, tensions may also arise within communities where stakeholder ideologies are at odds regarding the place identity being presented for consumption by tourism practices. Thus, using Mitchell’s model of creative destruction/creative enhancement as a theoretical framework and through qualitative analysis, the purpose of this paper is to critically examine three South Australian festivals from multiple perspectives, to identify what relevant stakeholders consider festivals contribute to the community and how this may impact on the success of the festival itself.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Mitchell’s model of creative destruction/creative enhancement as a theoretical framework and through qualitative analysis, this research critically examines three South Australian festivals from multiple perspectives, to identify what relevant stakeholders consider festivals contribute to the community and how this may impact on the success of the festival itself.

Findings

Findings suggest that those communities who present a more complex understanding of the “rural idyll” through the integration of multiple local products will experience greater success, both for internal and external audiences.

Originality/value

This research represents a unique contribution to the literature on festivals by combining the theoretical construct of cultural value with Mitchell’s model of creative destruction and creative enhancement, particularly within South Australia where little such work has been one, despite the fact that it presents itself as the “Festival State”.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Julian de Meyrick

The purpose of this paper is to show how health education is a strategy used to achieve the objective of maintenance and improvement in the community's welfare.

657

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how health education is a strategy used to achieve the objective of maintenance and improvement in the community's welfare.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper addresses two issues: are health educators attacking the right targets, and are the strategies being developed to attack those targets the right strategies?

Findings

Health education will make the most efficient contribution to long‐term improvement in communities' welfare when it attacks the right targets.

Originality/value

Shows how the strategies used to attack the right targets will be based on the best research available and will involve broader consultation with other disciplines.

Details

Health Education, vol. 106 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Tully Barnett

791

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Julian de Meyrick

The intention of this paper is to encourage debate among ethical researchers on this very important issue. Research necessary to underpin health education and health promotion is…

1392

Abstract

Purpose

The intention of this paper is to encourage debate among ethical researchers on this very important issue. Research necessary to underpin health education and health promotion is often controversial and often involves vulnerable populations such as young people and children. It is essential that the rights of these respondents are protected in every research project. Current research ethical approval processes aim to protect these rights but have the potential to undermine the viability of research projects in this area. This paper addresses two ethical issues associated with this research: the approval process and respondent consent.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at the codified antecedents of common ethical guidelines and discusses their application in a particular but not unusual health education research project.

Findings

The paper recommends the adoption of a simplified approval process and greater appreciation of the merits of researching among students in a classroom setting, when these students are an appropriate target market.

Research limitations/implications

Much health education research falls between medical research and marketing research. Guidelines for this sort of research need to be developed through discussion among practitioners and academics in the field.

Originality/value

Adoption of this simplified approach will facilitate more important research being undertaken without jeopardizing the rights or the welfare of the vulnerable respondents involved.

Details

Health Education, vol. 105 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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