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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Christopher Hughes, Jamie Costley and Christopher Lange

The paper aims to examine the effect of levels of self-regulated effort (SRE) and levels of cognitive load on the watching and completing of video lectures used as the main source…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the effect of levels of self-regulated effort (SRE) and levels of cognitive load on the watching and completing of video lectures used as the main source of instruction in online learning environments.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey provided data on the students’ engagement with video lectures, their level of SRE and the level of cognitive load they perceived while watching video lectures. The relationships between these variables and statistical significance were analyzed.

Findings

There were three key findings: a positive relationship between SRE and both watching and completing lectures; a negative relationship between SRE and perceptions of existing cognitive load; and students in different demographic groups watched fewer lectures, experienced higher cognitive load and reported lower levels of SRE.

Research limitations/implications

Implications of this study are that video lecture creation would benefit from the development of best practices, consideration of students’ levels of self-regulation, minimization of extraneous load and individual differences among groups of students. Limitations are the context-specific nature of the findings and the fact that data were drawn from self-reported survey responses, meaning they are subjective in nature.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in its investigation of relationship between SRE, cognitive load and video lecture viewership. No research of this topic could be found during the literature review. Findings are of value to those interested in reaping increased levels of video lecture viewership by showing elements that will encourage engagement, satisfaction and better transmission of instruction.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Jamie Costley

As online learning has become more prevalent, how learners interact with each other in those learning environments has become more salient. To develop effective levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

As online learning has become more prevalent, how learners interact with each other in those learning environments has become more salient. To develop effective levels of interaction, students must feel comfortable to express their ideas and views. For this reason, this paper aims to look at how individual students’ levels of social presence affect germane cognitive load. Germane cognitive load is the amount that students are able to construct schema and can be seen as analogous to learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This study looks at the results of survey data (n = 433) that investigate the relationship between social presence and germane cognitive load. The students were surveyed from the Open Cyber University of Korea in the fall semester of 2018.

Findings

The present study found a statistically significant positive relationship between social presence and germane cognitive load. The study found a Spearman’s correlation coefficient of 0.595. Furthermore, the sample was divided into a high, medium and low grouping of social presence. Among these groupings, the high level social presence had the highest level of germane cognitive load, and the low level social presence had the lowest level of germane cognitive load.

Originality/value

This result shows the importance and value of developing levels of social presence in online environments. Some research has shown relationships between student interaction and learning, but the present study looks directly at social presence and germane cognitive load. From this research, the authors can see the value of encouraging higher levels of social interaction in online learning environments.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Han Zhang, Ashleigh Southam, Mik Fanguy and Jamie Costley

This study aims to better understand the relationship between peer feedback in the context of online collaborative note-taking and how comments impacted student performance and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to better understand the relationship between peer feedback in the context of online collaborative note-taking and how comments impacted student performance and understanding.

Design/methodology/approach

This one sample investigation was of graduate students participating in an academic writing class working collaboratively online. Data was gathered on student feedback during note-taking activity to test for its effects on student performance and understanding.

Findings

The use of peer comments in online note-taking was found to impact student quiz scores and academic writing skills positively. However, no significance was found between comments and the completeness of their notes taken, suggesting its limits to promote deeper understanding.

Research limitations/implications

The level and detail about the comments made and how accurately they recall the important details from the video lectures is not known. The average number of comments made weekly by each group was also low.

Practical implications

Designers and teachers using online collaborative activities could benefit by understanding the nature in which peer comments can enhance student learning, bearing in mind the need for explicit guidance in how to comment and at what level of knowledge their comments should target.

Social implications

Online collaboration, peer editing and commenting is widely used by educators and the public. A better understanding of how these elements operate might improve the quality of knowledge artefacts such as academic writing and research notes.

Originality/value

Existing literature focuses mainly on peer feedback on writing or other artefacts; this paper seeks to find out more about the impact of comments in particular on collaborative note-taking.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Jamie Costley, Ashleigh Southam, Daniel Bailey and Shaibou Abbdoulai Haji

Online learning and the use of technology-based learning management systems (LMS) are on the rise in higher education. The purpose of this study is to explore how the frequent use…

Abstract

Purpose

Online learning and the use of technology-based learning management systems (LMS) are on the rise in higher education. The purpose of this study is to explore how the frequent use of these LMS mediates the relationship between three types of learner interactions and student outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This was an exploratory study using surveys that collected information on students’ use of LMS, their interactions and student outcomes. The participants of this study consisted of 362 undergraduate students from a South Korean University who were taking online classes as part of their degree.

Findings

The findings support existing research that increased learner interactions have positive effects on learning outcomes. However, some of the positive effects were reduced when considering the effect of higher levels of LMS use. In particular, learner-to-learner interactions.

Research limitations/implications

This information will enable educators to identify, measure and evaluate their online courses and consider how to integrate LMS use effectively. Results imply that focus may need to be on how learner to learner interactions can be best supported through the application of LMS.

Practical implications

This information will enable educators to identify, measure and evaluate their online courses and consider how to integrate LMS use effectively.

Social implications

Learner-to-learner interaction through social networking platforms may be more beneficial in socially constructing knowledge than formalizing interaction through LMS.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the field of online learning by suggesting that the importance of some types of learner interactions may be overestimated in relation to the importance of LMS use.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Jamie Costley and Christopher Henry Lange

Because student viewership of video lectures serves as an important aspect of e-learning environments, video lectures should be delivered in a way that enhances the learning…

2273

Abstract

Purpose

Because student viewership of video lectures serves as an important aspect of e-learning environments, video lectures should be delivered in a way that enhances the learning experience. The delivery of video lectures through diverse forms of media is a useful approach, which may have an effect on student learning, satisfaction, engagement and interest (LSEI), as well as future behavioral intentions (FBI). Furthermore, research has shown the value that LSEI has on learner achievement within online courses, as well as its value in regards to student intention to continue learning in such courses. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between media diversity, LSEI and FBI in hopes of enhancing the e-learning experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed a group of students (n = 88) who participated in cyber university classes in South Korea to investigate the correlations between media diversity and lecture viewership, effects of lecture viewership on LSEI and FBI, effects of media diversity on LSEI and FBI as well as the correlation between LSEI and FBI.

Findings

Results show no relationship between media diversity and viewership. Both lecture viewership and media diversity were positively correlated with LSEI. However, neither media diversity nor viewership was positively correlated with FBI. Finally, LSEI was positively correlated with FBI.

Originality/value

This paper looks at how video lectures affect LSEI. Past research has generally looked at learning, satisfaction, engagement and interest as separate entities that are affected by instructional aspects of online learning. Because of their interrelationships with each other, this study combines them as one construct, making a stronger case for their combined association.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Jamie Costley

This study aims to look at the relationship between extraneous cognitive load and germane cognitive load and how the use of cognitive learning strategies might moderate the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to look at the relationship between extraneous cognitive load and germane cognitive load and how the use of cognitive learning strategies might moderate the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This present study used survey data (n = 440) from randomly selected students taking large online classes in South Korea.

Findings

This research found a negative relationship between extraneous and germane loads. Furthermore, this study found that the use of cognitive strategies moderates this relationship. This shows that the use of cognitive strategies can help overcome unclear instruction and help to produce higher levels of student learning.

Originality/value

Within online learning environments, the degree to which nonessential information contributes to cognitive overload among learners becomes an important area of investigation, along with the ways in which learning strategies can mitigate some of this overload.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Jamie Costley

This paper looks at a particular type of cheating that occurs in an online university setting. That is, when students who have a connection from outside the online learning…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper looks at a particular type of cheating that occurs in an online university setting. That is, when students who have a connection from outside the online learning environment conspire to cheat together. It measures the correlations between student variables and cheating, instructional variables and cheating and learning outcomes and cheating. The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationships between these factors and cheating, in the hope that the multifaceted nature of academic dishonesty can be better understood.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed a group of students (n = 88) who participated in cyber university classes in South Korea. The study investigates the correlations between student characteristics, student attitudes, instructional design, lecture quality and learning outcomes with cheating.

Findings

The research looks at correlations between stable demographic factors and student attitudes towards cheating and finds no strong relationships. On the other hand, this study finds statistically significant negative correlations between instructional design quality and cheating, and lecture quality and cheating. This shows that instructors can affect the amount their students cheat through improving the quality of their courses. Also, there was a significant relationship between students’ levels of learning, satisfaction, engagement and interest and cheating.

Originality/value

Looking at cheating from a variety of angles within a single research agenda gives a clear understanding to instructors as to how cheating in their class will manifest, and how it will negatively impact the quality of a student’s experience.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Daniel Bailey, Ashleigh Southam and Jamie Costley

This study aims to increase language learning (L2) output by incorporating a digital storytelling chatbot system (known as a “storybot”) that focused interactions on a narrative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to increase language learning (L2) output by incorporating a digital storytelling chatbot system (known as a “storybot”) that focused interactions on a narrative. This study also sought to investigate student perceptions of these storybot interactions and improve on poor perception rates from previous studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This one-sample exploratory study was of student-storybot participation rates and student perceptions towards a storybot activity designed to increase L2 output. A combination of storybot participation analytics and survey analysis of student perception was carried out.

Findings

The use of storybots in the L2 class resulted in mixed participation rates. Students read nine times more than they wrote, indicating a high degree of reading comprehension necessary for storybot interaction. Survey results revealed that students believed storybots helped them meet their L2 goals, were relevant to their L2 and were easy to navigate.

Research limitations/implications

Interactions were through text messaging so no impact on speech or pronunciation could be observed. Further, the context was within a single university class in South Korea, restricting the generalization of findings to outside regions or with younger learners. Finally, while storybots proved to be valuable reading comprehension activities, the next step in this line of chatbot research should incorporate more writing prompts.

Practical implications

Storybots revealed explicit benefits to reading comprehension, as measured by cohesion between storybot delivered comprehension questions and student responses. Moreover, storybots can be used as examples for students in their own story creation, classroom forms to collect relevant student information regarding learning objectives and platforms for class quizzes.

Social implications

Storybots scaffold students through conversations, which abide by socio-pragmatic norms, providing models for L2 learners to incorporate in real-world text-based communication. Additionally, a wide range of idiomatic expressions is contextualized in comprehensible interactions that students can learn from the storybot then practice with friends.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing research on the use of chatbots for second L2 and offers specific insight into the use of narrative storybots as a means to increase L2 output and potentially benefit L2 reading comprehension.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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