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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Abida Ellahi, Rabia Mushtaq and Mohammed Bashir Khan

The worst scandals of the world's top companies have turned the attention of researchers towards the function of academic institutions in ethical training of future…

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1437

Abstract

Purpose

The worst scandals of the world's top companies have turned the attention of researchers towards the function of academic institutions in ethical training of future business leaders because the issue of dishonest behaviour of students becomes very severe, when they exercise the same practice at their place of work. Therefore, the understanding of the factors that affect student's decisions to engage in academic dishonesty is important for academic institutions, in order to reduce its occurrence. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of individual factors, situational factors and ethical factors on academic dishonesty behaviour of students in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire‐based field survey was conducted with 500 students across four universities in Pakistan.

Findings

It has been found that individual, situational and ethical factors affect on rationalisation of academic dishonesty and this rationalisation shapes actual conduct of academic dishonesty. Moreover, lack of well‐defined policies of the academic dishonesty in higher education is a major determinant of academic dishonesty among students.

Practical implications

The results provide a strong implication for academics. By discouraging such behaviour, academic institutions can help ensure the integrity of the degrees they offer, and help to level the fair grade competition among students.

Originality/value

The research provides a profound investigation of individual, situational and ethical factors as predictors of students’ academic dishonesty. The study is pioneering in its nature to explore two common forms of academic dishonesty, i.e. plagiarism and dual submission among university students. Furthermore, the study used rationalisation of academic dishonesty as a determinant of the actual act of academic dishonesty.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Kenneth J. Chapman and Robert A. Lupton

Academic dishonesty in post‐secondary education is a widespread, insidious and global problem. Business educators hosting foreign students locally and teaching abroad more…

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4324

Abstract

Academic dishonesty in post‐secondary education is a widespread, insidious and global problem. Business educators hosting foreign students locally and teaching abroad more than ever need to understand the nuances and attitudes of different student populations and how these differences may manifest themselves in a course. This research contributes to the growing albeit still scanty body of literature demonstrating that significant cross‐national differences exist regarding students' attitudes, beliefs and propensities toward cheating. This study compares US and Hong Kong university business students on three areas: cheating behaviors and perceptions, relationships between academic dishonesty and gender, and prediction of academic dishonesty. A total of 443 usable surveys were collected in the USA and 622 in Hong Kong. Statistically significant differences are presented followed by discussion and implications.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Nicholas Walker and Kristy Holtfreter

This paper aims to examine academic dishonesty and research misconduct, two forms of academic fraud, and provides suggestions for future research informed by…

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1889

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine academic dishonesty and research misconduct, two forms of academic fraud, and provides suggestions for future research informed by criminological theory.

Design/methodology/approach

After reviewing prior literature, this paper outlines four general criminological theories that can explain academic fraud.

Findings

While criminological theory has been applied to some studies of academic dishonesty, research misconduct has rarely been examined within a broader theoretical context.

Practical implications

This paper provides a blueprint for future theoretically informed analyses of academic fraud.

Originality/value

This paper represents a unique attempt to apply general criminological theories to diverse forms of fraud in higher education settings.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2014

Mary B. Curtis and John M. Williams

Prior research suggests both formal and informal norms influence employee behavior. While increased training is a typical recommendation to strengthen formal norms by…

Abstract

Prior research suggests both formal and informal norms influence employee behavior. While increased training is a typical recommendation to strengthen formal norms by increasing adherence to organizational codes of conduct, and therefore improve ethical behavior, there is little empirical evidence that code training actually strengthens formal norms or improves ethics-related behavior. Conversely, prior observations of unethical behavior serve as strong indicators of informal norms. These observations may be unknown to management and therefore difficult to moderate using other means, including with training on a code.

We test the impact of prior observations of unethical behavior and training for a code of conduct on intentions to report unethical behavior in the future, as well as possible mediators of these relationships. We find some support that training on the code increases intention to report and strong support for the notion that prior observations of unethical behavior decrease intentions to report. Responsibility to report and norms against whistle-blowing both mediate the prior observation-to-reporting intentions relationship, but not the training-to-reporting intentions relationship. An interesting by-product of training seems to be that, by increasing awareness of unethical behavior, and therefore the salience of prior observation, training may have indirectly influenced intentions in the opposite direction intended.

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Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-163-3

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Mian Sajid Nazir and Muhammad Shakeel Aslam

Academic dishonesty has been a matter of great concern in higher education for last few decades. The dishonest behavior of students at graduate and undergraduate level has…

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1920

Abstract

Purpose

Academic dishonesty has been a matter of great concern in higher education for last few decades. The dishonest behavior of students at graduate and undergraduate level has become a severe issue for education and business sectors, especially when the students exercise same dishonest practices at their jobs. The present research aims to address this matter by investigating the perceptions of students towards academic dishonesty and exploring the security and penalties for dishonest acts of students.

Design/methodology/approach

A well‐structured questionnaire was used to collect the data from 958 respondents studying at graduate and undergraduate levels in different Pakistani universities.

Findings

It has been found that students involve in academic dishonest acts more frequently about which they believe to be less severe. Moreover, they also suggested lower or no penalties for the same dishonest acts which are perceived as less severe.

Practical implications

The results provide a strong implication for academicians to develop the moralities and ethics in students so that institutions may provide ethically cultivated professionals to the business community.

Originality/value

The research paper is pioneer in its nature to explore the academic dishonest acts of students and their perceptions regarding some of the dimensions of academic dishonest and integrity in Pakistani university students.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Albert Caruana, B. Ramaseshan and Michael T. Ewing

Anomie describes the individual’s lack of integration in social life. The construct has been linked to various types of activities and concepts but no research appears to…

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4777

Abstract

Anomie describes the individual’s lack of integration in social life. The construct has been linked to various types of activities and concepts but no research appears to have been undertaken linking it to academic dishonesty. The literatures on anomie and academic dishonesty are examined, measurement instruments are identified and a survey is carried out among undergraduate students of a business school. The psychometric properties of the instruments are confirmed and correlates are investigated. The point is made that besides seeking ways to curb academic dishonesty, universities need to foster the development of an internalized code of ethics among students. Limitations are noted and directions for future research are indicated.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2019

Ted Brown, Stephen Isbel, Alexandra Logan and Jamie Etherington

Academic integrity is the application of honest, ethical and responsible behaviours to all facets of students’ scholarly endeavours and is the moral code of academia. The…

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1784

Abstract

Purpose

Academic integrity is the application of honest, ethical and responsible behaviours to all facets of students’ scholarly endeavours and is the moral code of academia. The international literature reports the prevalence of academic dishonesty in higher education across many disciplines (including the health sciences), and there is evidence linking academic dishonesty in health professional students with future unprofessional behaviour in the workplace. International students are reported to be a particularly vulnerable group. This paper aims to investigate the factors that may be predictive of academic honesty and performance in domestic and international occupational therapy students.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 701 participants (603 domestic students; 98 international students) were recruited from five Australian universities, and data were collected via a two-part self-report questionnaire. ANOVA and multi-linear regression analyses with bootstrapping were completed.

Findings

Tendency towards cheating and self-perception tendency towards dishonesty in research, gender, age and hours spent in indirect study were found to be statistically significant predictors of academic integrity and performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study were the use of convenience sampling and self-report scales which can be prone to social desirability bias. Further studies are recommended to explore other potential predictors of academic honesty and performance in occupational therapy students.

Originality/value

A range of predictors of academic honesty and success were found that will assist educators to target vulnerable domestic and international occupational therapy students as well as address deficiencies in academic integrity through proactive strategies.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

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Book part
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Ali Altug Bicer

The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between personality traits and students’ cheating behavior using the five-factor personality model and the fraud…

Abstract

The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between personality traits and students’ cheating behavior using the five-factor personality model and the fraud triangle factors. This chapter develops an evidential study that has the goal to determine the relationship between the students’ cheating behavior and personality traits by using fraud triangle factors. In this context, 251 surveys have been conducted on students of a foundation university located in Istanbul. As means of data collection, NEO – Five Factor Inventory and Academic Fraud Risk Factors have been used. Data have been analyzed by regression tree analysis. Risk and classification tables have been created before starting the study with a decision tree in which classification and regression trees algorithms were implemented. The results reveal that rationalization behind the cheating is the most important reason for students to copy and people who believed that they were extremely appropriate to copy were responsible ones when analyzed in terms of their personality traits. The results of this study contribute to the literature by discovering the characteristics of those who admit academic dishonesty and underlie the factors or predispositions for engaging in this behavior. For sure, three factors of the fraud triangle may have different levels of significance in this study; in addition, pressure is not associated with the cheating behavior.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Audit Management and Forensic Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-636-0

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Hairul Suhaimi Nahar

This paper aims to examine two specific research issues among future members of the Malaysian accountancy profession. First, it explores the extent of committed academic

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine two specific research issues among future members of the Malaysian accountancy profession. First, it explores the extent of committed academic dishonesty (AD) among accounting students in two institutions of higher learning in which Islamic orientation and emphasis are observably different. Second, it investigates whether pious accounting students are dishonesty-resistant, premising the investigation on the maintained assumption based on the Islamic religious scriptures that piety should be placed at the forefront of the crusade against academic malaise particularly AD.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a questionnaire survey to measure both AD and piety, the usable responses were analyzed using mean score and independent sample t-tests.

Findings

The results indicate that AD practices are within the safe and non-disturbing limit. The results on piety which form the crux of the research suggest that findings are sensitive to different piety measurement, indicating the need for a refine piety proxy in future Islamic piety research.

Originality/value

Notwithstanding the small sample based on only two universities, the results provide a critical basis for reality check and policy input on issues relating to AD and piety for all stakeholders, particularly in designing the relevant and necessary trainings and relevant policy formulation in addressing integrity issues in accounting education.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2019

Maria Rosario Catacutan

This study aims to investigate attitudes toward cheating among business students at a private university in Kenya and examine if a significant difference exists in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate attitudes toward cheating among business students at a private university in Kenya and examine if a significant difference exists in cheating perceptions among students who have completed one or two ethics courses, and those who have done none.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 554 undergraduate business students participated in this research. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the one-way ANOVA.

Findings

The results found that students perceived cheating in exam-related situations as quite serious, while cheating on written assignments was not considered a serious offence. Results of the one-way ANOVA indicate that there was a significant difference in the cheating perceptions ratings for the three groups. Post hoc comparisons using the Tukey HSD test indicate that the mean score for students who have done two ethics courses was significantly different from that of students who have done only one ethics course.

Practical implications

This study has a number of implications for educators and administrators. Ethics instruction cannot achieve its desired effect on student behavior without institutional support. Administrators also need to be cognizant of the influence that school environment has on student cheating. Faculty and university administrators can influence students’ behavior in the way they practice academic integrity in their teaching and administrative functions.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this research is the first study to explore academic cheating at a private Kenyan university where ethics instruction is taught to undergraduate students.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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