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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Nandeesh V. Hiremath, Amiya Kumar Mohapatra and Anil Subbarao Paila

The digital learning and learning & development (L&D) at workplaces in corporates is having a significant challenge, where only about 1% of the week is spent on L&D by the…

Abstract

Purpose

The digital learning and learning & development (L&D) at workplaces in corporates is having a significant challenge, where only about 1% of the week is spent on L&D by the employees. There are an array of recent L&D reports–by Deloitte, 2019; Skillsoft's, 2019; LinkedIn Workplace Learning Report-2019; UK L&D Report-2019; FICCI-NASSCOM and EY “Future of Jobs” Report-2017–which have clearly been indicating that the digital learning is fast-emerging as one of the realistic option. The employees invest their time and energy for skilling/up-skilling/re-skilling for remaining relevant to the emerging business context under volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity (VUCA) world and also coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is being researched.

Design/methodology/approach

The L&D interventions have primary objective of enhancing skills, competencies and career growth among employees, and the learning engagement styles/ systems are undergoing dramatic paradigm shifts. There is dire need to understand the impact of sweeping changes with Industry 4.0 and HR 4.0; however, there are only a few industry-centric studies that are available to assess the impact of technology on L&D with digital learning. Hence, there is a need to study the factors influencing various segments of workforce in large corporates, where the learning engagement with digital learning is fast-emerging among corporates.

Findings

Given the digital learning / L&D context in corporates, this research paper has attempted to review and analyse the opportunities, challenges and emerging trends with respect to leveraging technology and innovation to enhance L&D to deliver the business goals, under the 70:20:10 framework, with case analysis of ten different corporates (across different industry sectors) viz., Genpact, Nexval, Airbus, Siemens, AstraZeneca Pharma, HPCL, HGS (BPM), HP, Flipkart and IBM. The A-to-Z of Talent Management and Leadership Development (adopted version from India Leadership Academy, Publicis Sapient, 2019) best practices are analysed, summarized and presented to indicate emerging trends in Industry 4.0 era.

Research limitations/implications

This study has been carried out for just ten major corporates/ multinational companies (MNCs) operating in various sectors. The sample size used is relatively less; therefore, the study can be carried out with a larger sample size and deeper data analysis and insights across countries/continents. At present, this can be considered as a base-research for undertaking deep-dive analysis. The sectoral analysis and cross-industry perspectives require consideration in next studies. To address the sector-specific issues, the research can be undertaken for either a particular sector such as manufacturing, automotive, IT/ITeS, telecom, aviation, agri-tech and pharmaceutical, knowledge-based industries, etc. or comparative analysis across few related sectors required.

Practical implications

This research has provided/shall provide a basis to understand the various factors that influence the L&D and digital learning ecosystem in large corporates. It is expected to provide a practical and also strategic perspective towards effective usage of digital learning systems (both in-house and open systems) for enhancing the effectiveness of L&D in the context of VUCA World and HR 4.0 around us. The proposed hypothesis of “The Digital Learning is the “Future of HR”, especially for the L&D in large Corporate Academies (in the context of Industry 4.0)” stands justified.

Social implications

The clear shift from training culture to “Learning Culture” is possible and feasible with strategically planned digital learning/ L&D interventions, which benefits the corporates, employees, customers and the society at large.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, probably this is one of the first paper in the analysing the industry best L&D/Digital learning practices from an practitioners and academic perspective, as we live in the era of bit-sized and byte sized micro-learning. This study contributes to the academics by providing insights on possible digital learning policies that can be practiced by large corporates, where the “ownership of learning and career growth” is transferred onto the employees. The result of this study complements the evolving digital learning trends, in line with science of self-driven and lifelong learning principle.

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Michael Manderino and Jill Castek

Today’s digitally connected classrooms have the potential to be places for rich and engaged disciplinary learning. This chapter takes two topics that have been identified…

Abstract

Today’s digitally connected classrooms have the potential to be places for rich and engaged disciplinary learning. This chapter takes two topics that have been identified in the What’s Hot in Literacy 2019 study, digital literacies and disciplinary literacies, and illustrates their intersections and synergies. Both areas have remained hot and very hot as individual topics. In this chapter, the authors explore the powerful opportunities to harness the learning potential of the Internet to engage learners across disciplines. By forging connections between digital literacies for disciplinary learning, the authors examine practices and develop pedagogies that youth deserve.

Details

What’s Hot in Literacy: Exemplar Models of Effective Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-874-1

Keywords

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Abstract

Game-based learning or simulation-based learning – especially Serious Games – are notions of the contemporary discourse on digitalisation in the higher education sector in Germany. These methods offer a more vivid and motivating learning context and they help to improve important competencies for reaching work-related higher education goals. This explorative study focuses on experts’ experiences with digital and non-digital serious games and their contribution towards developing self, social and management competencies, in the Bundeswehr Command and Staff College in Hamburg (Germany). Whilst there are numerous opportunities for using serious games in higher education, their use creates barriers for addressing social, as well as leadership/management competencies. In the future, game-based learning – and more specifically, digital game-based learning – could challenge the relation between learning as hard work and learn for fun, and between explicit and goal-oriented learning and implicit, incidental and explorative learning.

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Mohit Kant Kaushik and Devika Agrawal

The study has identified the factors among students that can enable or inhibit students from using online learning platforms. Students enrolled at different levels…

Abstract

Purpose

The study has identified the factors among students that can enable or inhibit students from using online learning platforms. Students enrolled at different levels, diversified streams and separate courses were surveyed for the investigation. The study also highlights the significant hitches faced in using or adopting e-learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses were collected from Indian students on a seven-point Likert-type scale using a structured questionnaire around the updated Technology Readiness Index's four dimensions. Adapted dimensions were evolved to identify the people's propensity to accept and reject the new technology.

Findings

The result of the survey highlights the students' positive attitude towards the e-learning approach. The diffusion of e-learning platforms occupies them with a feeling of optimism and innovativeness. However, discomfort in using the newly penetrated e-learning platforms was also found. Furthermore, no significant variances concerning the different demographics were detected.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional research approach was used for the investigation. However, it is evident that with the use and experience of technology, an increase in its acceptance follows. Thus, a longitudinal research approach should explore the differences between students' earlier and later involvement after experiencing the platform. A cross-country investigation is also needed to measure the technological biases among students.

Practical implications

With advancements in technology, the chances of diffusion of e-learning in traditional classrooms have risen. However, to encourage the student's engagement towards e-learning, the platform needs to be student and teacher-friendly. This study serves the purpose of exploring the determinants that will guide educational institutes and developers of online platforms in achieving excellence in enhancement and engagement among students.

Originality/value

The investigation adds to recognize the acceptance of e-learning among students by exploring its determinants using the Technology Readiness Index 2.0. The study has also explored the differences in readiness to use e-learning on differences in enrolment level, institute type and courses.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Konstantina Martzoukou, Crystal Fulton, Petros Kostagiolas and Charilaos Lavranos

An increasing amount of research and debate has emerged over the last few years, emphasising the need for developing digitally competent, literate, able, skilled, capable…

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Abstract

Purpose

An increasing amount of research and debate has emerged over the last few years, emphasising the need for developing digitally competent, literate, able, skilled, capable people within a constantly changing technological and online environment. Existing definitions and perspectives in this area go beyond the use of technological tools or media for the creation of a digital literacy mindset, which develops throughout one's life. However, Higher Education strategies have not yet caught up with this agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

A student survey with Library and Information Science students from three higher education institutions in Scotland, Ireland and Greece was conducted as a basis of empirical data to support the theoretical propositions of the study. The survey centred on the technical and higher-level digital competences of students and drawing from students' self-perceived digital competences for learning and for the everyday life digital context, addressing e-leisure, e-learning, e-democracy, e-government and e-health activities. The survey critically enabled students to assess digital competences from their perspectives as digital participants.

Findings

Students' self-assessment of digital competences were lacking in a number of areas, which involved the development of information literacy, digital creation, digital research and digital identity management. In addition, students' digital competences were found to be linked to previous experiences within the everyday life digital environment. The higher the self-perceived digital competence levels of students were on the basis of dealing with everyday life digital tasks, the more likely they were to also develop high self-perceived digital competence in other digital areas related to their education.

Originality/value

Higher education has not fully embraced digital competences as a core, fundamental literacy which addresses both technology mastery and a digital citizenship mindset. As emerging models begin to challenge traditional teaching and learning paradigms, with global connectivity and personalised approaches, existing digital divides may be further accelerated. This requires revisiting digital competences with emphasis on the diversity of the contexts where it develops and of the learners involved, in the overall continuum of learning for life.

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Ju‐Ling Shih, Gwo‐Jen Hwang, Yu‐Chung Chu and Chien‐Wen Chuang

This study proposes a mobile learning model that employs digital libraries to support investigative learning activities. A student‐centered mobile learning activity with…

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2219

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes a mobile learning model that employs digital libraries to support investigative learning activities. A student‐centered mobile learning activity with self‐guided exploration for physical ecology observation has been conducted to demonstrate the benefits of using digital libraries to support investigation‐based ecology learning activities.

Design/methodology/approach

An investigation‐based mobile learning model is proposed and an experiment is designed to show the effectiveness of the learning model, in which the students are asked to answer a series of questions by observing the real‐world learning objects and searching for supplemental materials from a digital library.

Findings

The instructional experiment conducted in an elementary school with 64 sixth grade students shows that the innovative approach is able to improve the learning achievement, learning effectiveness, as well as the learning attitudes of the students.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper imply that the use of the investigative learning model will significantly promote the utilization rate of digital libraries.

Originality/value

An investigative model for using digital libraries to support mobile learning is proposed in this paper. It provides good guidance to teachers for designing learning activities with digital libraries, and a good way for students to learn, utilizing the materials in digital libraries.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Chih‐Ming Chen and Chia‐Chi Chen

This paper seeks to assess the differences between learning performance and the satisfaction of learners who use digital resources in the Taiwan Libraries' History Digital

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5090

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to assess the differences between learning performance and the satisfaction of learners who use digital resources in the Taiwan Libraries' History Digital Library (organized digital resources) and the Google search engine (unorganized digital resources) in problem‐solving learning for the same subject via the problem‐based learning (PBL) mode. The paper aims to explore the advantages and characteristics of using digital archives to support PBL and to offer suggestions that are helpful when using digital archives to support e‐learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted the quasi‐experimental design method to assign all participants into an experimental group and control group to evaluate differences in learning performance and the satisfaction of learners who use different digital resources during PBL processes. A statistical analysis scheme was employed to evaluate the learning performance of learners during PBL supported by different digital resources in terms of learning processes, PBL outcomes, and a questionnaire.

Findings

The study obtained the following conclusions: learning performance and the satisfaction of learners in the experimental group during PBL processes supported by digital archival resources were superior to those of control‐group learners who were supported by search engine resources; compared with search engine resources, the digital archival resources provide benefits in the learning phase, such as “action” (i.e. doing), in the proposed PBL mode, which has three learning phases; and compared with resources accessed through the Google search engine, PBL supported by digital archival resources should enhance searching performance and thereby increase learner willingness to use digital archives during e‐learning.

Practical implications

Using digital archives to support e‐learning is a new trend in the library sciences field; however, few studies have developed useful learning modes for effective e‐learning supported by digital archives. Evidential research related to e‐learning supported by digital archives is also lacking; most studies used digital archives as digital course materials, thus ignoring the principal property of digital archives – excellent resource organization.

Originality/value

The paper shows that by integrating the PBL mode with digital archives one can identify the advantages of digital archives in supporting e‐learning, resulting in innovative and valuable research.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Helen Dimou and Achilles Kameas

This paper aims to present a model for the quality assurance of digital educational material that is appropriate for adult education. The proposed model adopts the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a model for the quality assurance of digital educational material that is appropriate for adult education. The proposed model adopts the software quality standard ISO/IEC 9126 and takes into account adult learning theories, Bloom’s taxonomy of learning objectives and two instructional design models: Kolb’s model (the learning cycle) and Gagne, Briggs and Wager’s model.

Design/methodology/approach

The structure of this paper is as follows: in the second section, the theory of “the learning cycle of Kolb” is discussed. The third section discusses the model of Gagne, Biggs & Wager. The fourth section discusses and categorizes the characteristics and sub-characteristics of the quality of digital educational material. The fifth section discusses and categorizes the quality attributes of digital educational material. Moreover, the correlation of the sub-characteristics of the material with the model of Gagne and that of Kolb are examined.

Findings

The authors developed a quality model that adopts the structure of ISO/IEC 9126 standard, using basic notions of theories of adult education to define its characteristics and sub-characteristics. The model has been successfully applied in the quality evaluation of educational material distributed to distance learning adult students.

Originality/value

The innovative combination of an established quality model with sound educational theories yields a comprehensive model that allows both a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the appropriateness of digital educational material. The applicability of the model is demonstrated by applying it to specific digital materials specially developed for adult education.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Fahri Karakas and Alperen Manisaligil

The purpose of this paper is to identify the new role that human resource developers play in the globally connected workplace. Towards that end, this paper explores the…

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3049

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the new role that human resource developers play in the globally connected workplace. Towards that end, this paper explores the changing landscape of self‐directed learning (SDL) within the digital ecosystem based on the concept of World 2.0.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews and builds on the literatures of self‐directed learning and Web 2.0 technologies to explore how self‐directed learning is being transformed in the creative digital era.

Findings

The paper outlines five transformations that change the landscape of workplace learning in the creative digital era: virtual collaboration, technological convergence, global connectivity, online communities, and digital creativity.

Practical implications

This paper gives extensive guidance on how HRD specialists and practitioners can transform their strategies to adapt to the training needs of employees in the creative digital era. The paper provides new ideas and vision for industrial trainers and human resource development practitioners on self‐directed learning.

Research limitations/implications

This article provides some future research areas and limitations.

Originality/value

This paper opens up new possibilities for self‐directed learning and discusses how self‐directed learning might be transformed in the light of technological and workplace changes. In particular, self‐directed learning might decrease the HRD/training costs significantly while providing employees with just‐in time training.

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Gila Cohen Zilka

Education systems worldwide are facing the question whether to adopt the “Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)” approach and allow students to bring their personal laptops to…

Abstract

Purpose

Education systems worldwide are facing the question whether to adopt the “Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)” approach and allow students to bring their personal laptops to school. The purpose of the study was to understand the advantages and disadvantages of using a laptop during lessons in schools and in institutions of higher education, from the perspective of preservice teachers who watch the lessons and practice teaching in schools, while studying at an institution of higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The research questions were: What are the pros and cons of a regular use of personal laptops during lessons? How do learners use their laptop during lessons in schools and colleges? This was a mixed-method study with emphasis on quality analysis. Methods. Participants were 215 preservice teachers studying at academic institutions for teacher training in Israel.

Findings

The findings indicate that the benefits of using laptops are in the availability and accessibility of the digital environments and the many possibilities to integrate these environments and achieve goals of acquiring skills in the process of learning and teaching that takes place in the classroom. The findings further show that all learners, and especially adolescents, extensively and frequently use various digital developments.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined the integration of laptops in the teaching and learning processes of preservice teachers who are in the process of forming their identity as future professionals teaching in the twenty-first century. The lessons chosen by preservice teachers to conduct during their teaching practicum have not been examined, therefore it is desirable that future studies examine the way in which preservice teachers choose the lessons to teach and how they practice teaching: whether in the traditional or the constructivist way, and if so, why?

Practical implications

It is advisable to enable preservice teachers to look at a combination of digital environments in teaching and to experience teaching in these environments, to increase e-readiness for teaching in a digital environment.

Social implications

How do learners use their laptops during lessons in school and in higher education?

Originality/value

Acquiring skills in the process of learning and teaching that takes place in the classroom.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

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