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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2020

Dimitris Kanellopoulos

Information-centric networking (ICN) is an innovative paradigm for the future internet architecture. This paper aims to provide a view on how academic video lectures can…

Abstract

Purpose

Information-centric networking (ICN) is an innovative paradigm for the future internet architecture. This paper aims to provide a view on how academic video lectures can exploit the ICN paradigm. It discusses the design of academic video lectures over named data networking (NDN) (an ICN architecture) and speculates their future development. To the best of author’s knowledge, a similar study has not been presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a visionary essay that introduces the background, elaborates the basic concepts and presents the author’s views and insights into academic video lectures that exploit the latest development of NDN approach and its applications.

Findings

The ICN paradigm is closely related to the levels of automation and large-scale uptake of multimedia applications that provide video lectures. Academic video lectures over NDN have: improved efficiency, better scalability with respect to information/bandwidth demand and better robustness in challenging communication scenarios. A framework of academic video lectures over NDN must take into account various key issues such as naming (name resolution), optimized routing, resource control, congestion control, security and privacy. The size of the network in which academic video lectures are distributed, the content location dynamics and the popularity of the stored video lectures will determine which routing scheme must be selected. If semantic information is included into academic video lectures, the network dynamically may assist video (streaming) lecture service by permitting the network to locate the proper version of the requested video lecture that can be better delivered to e-learners and/or select the appropriate network paths.

Practical implications

The paper helps researchers already working on video lectures in finding a direction for designing and deploying platforms that will provide content-centric academic video lectures.

Originality/value

The paper pioneers the investigation of academic video lecture distribution in ICN and presents an in-depth view to its potentials and research trends.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Ed Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a credit‐bearing information literacy course was enhanced through the use of video lectures to deliver course content…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a credit‐bearing information literacy course was enhanced through the use of video lectures to deliver course content. Students have a choice of how to access course materials: video lectures or reading material.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review shows that, previously, videos have been used largely to supplement face‐to‐face classes or one‐shot library instruction sessions. A description details the production of video lectures for one of the courses that satisfies the information literacy graduation requirement at Weber State University. For this course, a student survey was then used to measure the actual use and effectiveness of the video lectures.

Findings

Survey results indicate that a majority of students use the video lectures, at least partly, and find them helpful.

Research limitations/implications

Results also show that many students are comfortable reading course materials rather than viewing the lectures. As more courses incorporate video lectures, holdouts should become more comfortable with the format.

Practical implications

Video lectures are relatively easy to create, and can be used to enhance online information literacy classes. Students can view the video lectures at their convenience.

Originality/value

Video production tools such as Camtasia Studio are used for library instruction and other face‐to‐face classes, but are not widely used in online courses. Adding video lectures to an online course gives students options on how to access the course content.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Jamie Costley and Christopher Henry Lange

Because student viewership of video lectures serves as an important aspect of e-learning environments, video lectures should be delivered in a way that enhances the…

Abstract

Purpose

Because student viewership of video lectures serves as an important aspect of e-learning environments, video lectures should be delivered in a way that enhances the learning experience. The delivery of video lectures through diverse forms of media is a useful approach, which may have an effect on student learning, satisfaction, engagement and interest (LSEI), as well as future behavioral intentions (FBI). Furthermore, research has shown the value that LSEI has on learner achievement within online courses, as well as its value in regards to student intention to continue learning in such courses. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between media diversity, LSEI and FBI in hopes of enhancing the e-learning experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed a group of students (n = 88) who participated in cyber university classes in South Korea to investigate the correlations between media diversity and lecture viewership, effects of lecture viewership on LSEI and FBI, effects of media diversity on LSEI and FBI as well as the correlation between LSEI and FBI.

Findings

Results show no relationship between media diversity and viewership. Both lecture viewership and media diversity were positively correlated with LSEI. However, neither media diversity nor viewership was positively correlated with FBI. Finally, LSEI was positively correlated with FBI.

Originality/value

This paper looks at how video lectures affect LSEI. Past research has generally looked at learning, satisfaction, engagement and interest as separate entities that are affected by instructional aspects of online learning. Because of their interrelationships with each other, this study combines them as one construct, making a stronger case for their combined association.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Christopher Hughes, Jamie Costley and Christopher Lange

The paper aims to examine the effect of levels of self-regulated effort (SRE) and levels of cognitive load on the watching and completing of video lectures used as the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the effect of levels of self-regulated effort (SRE) and levels of cognitive load on the watching and completing of video lectures used as the main source of instruction in online learning environments.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey provided data on the students’ engagement with video lectures, their level of SRE and the level of cognitive load they perceived while watching video lectures. The relationships between these variables and statistical significance were analyzed.

Findings

There were three key findings: a positive relationship between SRE and both watching and completing lectures; a negative relationship between SRE and perceptions of existing cognitive load; and students in different demographic groups watched fewer lectures, experienced higher cognitive load and reported lower levels of SRE.

Research limitations/implications

Implications of this study are that video lecture creation would benefit from the development of best practices, consideration of students’ levels of self-regulation, minimization of extraneous load and individual differences among groups of students. Limitations are the context-specific nature of the findings and the fact that data were drawn from self-reported survey responses, meaning they are subjective in nature.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in its investigation of relationship between SRE, cognitive load and video lecture viewership. No research of this topic could be found during the literature review. Findings are of value to those interested in reaping increased levels of video lecture viewership by showing elements that will encourage engagement, satisfaction and better transmission of instruction.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2018

Frank Alpert and Chris S. Hodkinson

Despite the expansion of e-learning, higher education still involves live lectures, which students often see as “boring”. Lecture classes can be made more engaging and…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the expansion of e-learning, higher education still involves live lectures, which students often see as “boring”. Lecture classes can be made more engaging and effective by including videos. However, empirical research is yet to report on current video use in lectures, or on student perceptions of and preferences for videos. The purpose of this paper is to fill that knowledge gap.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage mixed-method study used focus groups to gain a rich understanding of student’s video experiences, preferences and the types of videos they are shown. These understandings were utilised in a detailed on-line survey questionnaire, which was completed by a diverse sample of 773 university students, who responded about their recent in-class video experiences.

Findings

Students report that about 87 per cent of lecture classes included one or more videos. This paper reports on instructor practices, develops a video typology and reports on students’ preferred frequency, type of video, video source, video length and existing vs preferred video integration methods.

Practical implications

The results provide useful information for educational administrators. Recommendations are made for effective use of videos in lectures by instructors.

Originality/value

This is the first qualitative and survey research investigating current practice and student perceptions of video use during lecture classes. The authors also conduct the first survey with a broad sample across universities and academic disciplines using the unit of analysis of videos seen per course last week. Typologies of sources of videos, instructional functions, video facilitation techniques and types of videos used during lectures are proposed and then measured.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Chooi Chea Chiam, Tai Kwan Woo, Han Tek Chung and P. Rajesh Kumar K.P. Nair

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into learners’ behavioural intention to use the video lectures as their learning material. The behavioural intention construct…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into learners’ behavioural intention to use the video lectures as their learning material. The behavioural intention construct is measured in terms of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of video lectures. It is hoped that the findings of this study will provide feedback as to learners’ intention to use as well as guidelines on how to improve the development of video lectures as the university gears to offer more courses in the fully online mode in the near future.

Design/methodology/approach

A total sample of 392 questionnaires were collected for this study using technology acceptance model model. Descriptive and inferential statistics are used as the main analytical tool to study the learners’ behavioural intention to use the video lectures as their learning material. The behavioural intention construct is measured in terms of two dimensions: perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of video lectures.

Findings

In conclusion, the findings from this research study seem to suggest that OUM learners have a positive perception of video lectures with reference to the two dimensions of “ease of use” and “usefulness”, where ease of use is concerned, OUM learners rate content relevancy, appropriate language and viewing flexibility as the strongest points of video lectures. The aspects ranked lowest are technical (ability to play the video lecture smoothly from the beginning to the end) as well as objective of usage (video lectures are not rated high as revision material for exam preparation).

Research limitations/implications

Future studies can be conducted pertaining to issues on the context in which learning is taking place within higher education, various definitions of video, and ways of categorising and presenting these different types, teaching “with” and “through” video from the perspective of the lecturer and the educational institution, approaches to didactically embedding and integrating video into a course that results in effective learning and the process and support needed by the (traditional) lecturer to create and deploy various types of video content.

Originality/value

Over the last ten years, the production of video has gone from a complicated and technical process to one easily done by the general masses. It is now possible for anyone with a mobile phone to make a video recording. The question lies on whether the students have deeper meaning of learning via video lectures and the perception of students on using video lecture as teaching tool in the open and distance learning.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2414-6994

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Yu‐Tzu Lin, Bai‐Jang Yen, Chia‐Hu Chang, Greg C. Lee and Yu‐Chih Lin

The purpose of this paper is to propose an indexing and teaching focus mining system for lecture videos recorded in an unconstrained environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an indexing and teaching focus mining system for lecture videos recorded in an unconstrained environment.

Design/methodology/approach

By applying the proposed algorithms in this paper, the slide structure can be reconstructed by extracting slide images from the video. Instead of applying traditional shot‐change detection methods for general videos, a new edge‐based shot‐change detection algorithm is designed specifically for lecture videos. Besides, light influence and occlusions in the lecture video can be removed to obtain more accurate results. Moreover, the teaching focus can be extracted according to instructors' behavior based on the analyses of visual and audio information extracted from the lecture video.

Findings

Experiment results show the feasibility of the proposed method, that is, the slide shots can be correctly detected even if the illumination conditions are variant or the slides are obstructed by the instructor or students, and the teaching focus can be extracted to provide learners with an efficient way to study.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides only technical experiments, but lacks complete educational study. In the future, more subjective tests will be designed to examine the educational effects on students.

Practical implications

This paper proposes a practical indexing and teaching focus mining system for lecture videos which can help students learn.

Originality/value

The proposed algorithms for indexing and teaching focus mining are derived and applied in lecture videos in this paper.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Earl K. Stice, James D. Stice and Conan Albrecht

We use student-level online resource usage data for students in four different introductory accounting courses to explore the impact on exam performance of both student…

Abstract

We use student-level online resource usage data for students in four different introductory accounting courses to explore the impact on exam performance of both student study effort and students’ revealed preferences for reading text or watching video lectures. The online learning tool tracks student study choice (read text, watch video, or skip) on a paragraph-by-paragraph level. We match these usage data with student performance on course exams. We find that students who study more material earn higher exam scores than do students who study less material. We also find that students who self-select to do relatively more of their studying through reading text score higher on exams, on average, than do students who self-select to do relatively more of their studying through watching videos. Specifically, holding the overall amount of study constant, a student who chooses to spend the highest fraction of her or his study time watching video mini lectures earns exam scores 10 percentage points lower (six-tenths of a standard deviation) than a student who chooses to spend the lowest fraction of study time watching videos. Our results demonstrate that at least for introductory accounting students, increased study effort does indeed have a positive impact on exam performance. Our evidence also suggests that the highest performing introductory accounting students choose to learn accounting proportionately more through reading than through watching. These results are a reminder that when we talk about using “technology” to help our students learn accounting, the written word is still an important technology.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-236-2

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2017

Rim Gouia-Zarrad and Cindy Gunn

A ‘flipped’ or ‘inverted’ teaching approach (Lage et al., 2000) reverses the traditional use of in- and out-ofclass time, delivering instructional input to students before…

Abstract

A ‘flipped’ or ‘inverted’ teaching approach (Lage et al., 2000) reverses the traditional use of in- and out-ofclass time, delivering instructional input to students before class and devoting classroom time to applying this input in small group tasks. This study investigates the use of videoed lectures and attitudes to in-class activities among undergraduate students in first year Calculus classes using either a lecture-based or a ‘flipped classroom’ approach. Survey results indicate that while the majority of the students embrace the flipped experience and more specifically the in-class group work activities, they lacked the confidence in their self-learning abilities to completely part with an instructor-led class. This finding and its impact on implementing a flipped classroom supports concerns found in the literature that first- and second-year students may need more guidance from their professors before they can truly benefit from the flipped learning model of instruction.

بلقي جهنم سيردتلا " بولقملا " وأ " سوكعملا ) " جيل ،هئﻼمزو 2000 ( فيظوتلا يديلقتلا تقولل لخاد فصلا هجراخو ذإ دوزي بلاطلا داوملاب ةيميلعتلا لبق ءدب فصلا صصخيو تقو ءاقللا يفصلا قيبطتل ام هملعت بلاطلا كلذو نمض تاعومجم مّ ل عت ةريغص ةفداه . لوانتت هذه ةساردلا فيظوت تارضاحم ويديفلا فقاومو ةبلطلا نم ةطشنﻷا ةيفصلا نيب بﻼط ةنسلا ةيعماجلا ىلوﻷا نيقحتلملا تاقاسمب باسح لضافتلا لماكتلاو ) سلوكلاك ( ، كلذو اقﻼطنا نم جهنم دمتعي امإ تارضاحملا وأ فوفصلا ةبولقملا . ريشتو جئاتن حسملا ىلإ هنأ يف نيح لبقي بلغأ بﻼطلا ىلع ةبرجت فصلا ،بولقملا ىلعو هجو ديدحتلا ةطشنأ لمعلا يعامجلا لخاد ،فصلا ريغ مهنأ نورقتفي ىلإ ةقثلا يف مهتاردق ىلع ملعتلا يتاذلا ىلإ دح مهلعجي ريغ نيرداق ىلع يلختلا امامت نع فص هروحم ذاتسﻷا . دناستو هذه ةجيتنلا اهريثأتو ىلع ذيفنت فوفص ةيسارد ةبولقم فواخملا ةدوجوملا يف تايبدﻷا اهدافمو نأ بﻼط ةنسلا ىلوﻷا ةيناثلاو دق نوجاتحي ىلإ ديزم نم هيجوتلا نم مهتذتاسأ لبق نأ اونكمتي نم ةدافتسﻻا اقح نم جذومن ملعتلا بولقملا يف سيردتلا .

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Frank Ollermann, Rüdiger Rolf, Christian Greweling and André Klaßen

This paper aims to describe the principles underlying the successful implementation of a lecture recording service in higher education.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the principles underlying the successful implementation of a lecture recording service in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper qualitatively reviews the practices and experiences of several years of automated lecture recording at a medium-sized university in Germany.

Findings

The paper concludes that there are several principles that should be followed to successfully implement lecture recordings in higher education.

Practical implications

The principles described in this paper can serve as recommendations for other universities that would like to establish or optimize their own lecture recording service.

Originality/value

The value of the paper lies mainly in the great amount of experience in successfully running a lecture recording service on which the principles and recommendations are based.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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