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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Munish Chhabra and Rupinder Singh

This paper seeks to review the industrial applications of state‐of‐the‐art additive manufacturing (AM) techniques in metal casting technology. An extensive survey of…

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3547

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review the industrial applications of state‐of‐the‐art additive manufacturing (AM) techniques in metal casting technology. An extensive survey of concepts, techniques, approaches and suitability of various commercialised rapid casting (RC) solutions with traditional casting methods is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The tooling required for producing metal casting such as fabrication of patterns, cores and moulds with RC directly by using different approaches are presented and evaluated. Relevant case studies and examples explaining the suitability and problems of using RC solutions by various manufacturers and researchers are also presented.

Findings

Latest research to optimize the current RC solutions, and new inventions in processing techniques and materials in RC performed by researchers worldwide are also discussed. The discussion regarding the benefits of RC solutions to foundrymen, and challenges to produce accurate and cost‐effective RC amongst AM manufacturers concludes this paper.

Research limitations/implications

The research related to this survey is limited to the applicability of RC solutions to sand casting and investment casting processes. There is practically no implication in industrial application of RC technology.

Originality/value

This review presents the information regarding potential AM application – RC, which facilitates the fabrication of patterns, cores and moulds directly using the computer‐aided design data. The information available in this paper serves the purpose of researchers and academicians to explore the new options in the field of RC and especially users, manufacturers and service industries to produce casting in relatively much shorter time and at low cost and even to cast complex design components which otherwise was impossible by using traditional casting processes and CNC technology.

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Vivek Kumar Tiwary, Arunkumar P., Anand S. Deshpande and Nikhil Rangaswamy

Due to intrinsic limitations, fused deposition modelling (FDM) products suffer from the bad surface finish and inaccurate dimensional accuracies restricting its usage in…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to intrinsic limitations, fused deposition modelling (FDM) products suffer from the bad surface finish and inaccurate dimensional accuracies restricting its usage in many applications. Hence, there is a need for processing polymer patterns before, during and after their productions. This paper aims to highlight the importance of pre- and post-processing treatments on the FDM-based acrylonitrile butadiene styrene patterns improving its surface quality so, that it can be used in rapid investment casting process for making medical implants and other high precision components.

Design/methodology/approach

As a part of pre-processing treatment, the machine parameters affecting the surface quality were identified and optimised using design of experiments. The patterns developed after the first stage of optimisation were given different post-processing treatments, which included vapour smoothening, chemical treatment and sand paper polishing. The results were compared and the best ones were used for making patterns for making medical implants via rapid investment casting technique. The surface quality was checked while the dimensional changes happening during the stages of this hybrid technique were recorded using a three-dimensional optical scanner.

Findings

The surface roughness of the FDM based ABS patterns reduced from 21.63 to 14.40 µm with pre-processing treatments. Chemical treatment (post-processing treatment) turned to be the most suitable technique for reducing the surface roughness further down to 0.30 µm. Medical implants that used these pre- and post-processing treatments gave an average surface roughness of 0.68 µm. Cost and lead time comparisons showed that rapid investment casting technique can be a better method for low volume, customised and with specific requirements.

Originality/value

FDM parts/medical implants produced by rapid investment casting technique suffer from the inferior surface finish and inaccurate dimensional accuracies limiting its applications. A systematic approach to overcome this issue is presented in this research paper. This will directly help the end users and the manufacturers of medical implants, wherein, better surface finish and dimensionally accurate components are expected.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

P.M. Dickens, R. Stangroom, M. Greul, B. Holmer, K.K.B. Hon, R. Hovtun, R. Neumann, S. Noeken and D. Wimpenny

The Tooling and Casting subgroup of the European Action on Rapid Prototyping (EARP) has undertaken a project to investigate the problems associated with using rapid…

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1336

Abstract

The Tooling and Casting subgroup of the European Action on Rapid Prototyping (EARP) has undertaken a project to investigate the problems associated with using rapid prototype models as sacrificial patterns for investment casting. The accuracy and surface finish of the models and the castings were also assessed so that a comparison could be made. Models from each process were manufactured by different members of EARP and then three foundries were each given a set of models to convert to castings. Observes that one of the oldest metal manufacturing techniques, which dates back to 4000‐6000 BC, is being used with one of the most modern ‐ rapid prototyping.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1965

THE use of investment castings for aerospace applications dates back to the Second World War when components made by this process were utilized in the construction of…

Abstract

THE use of investment castings for aerospace applications dates back to the Second World War when components made by this process were utilized in the construction of superchargers for piston aero engines and nozzle components for turbojet engines. The technique has developed enormously since that time so that today investment castings are used widely for aircraft and missile applications—particularly on the power plant side for blading.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Brian Rooks

A seminar organised by the Rapid Prototype and Manufacturing Association (RPMA) held at the UK Castings Development Centre in Birmingham presented a series of case studies…

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1487

Abstract

A seminar organised by the Rapid Prototype and Manufacturing Association (RPMA) held at the UK Castings Development Centre in Birmingham presented a series of case studies on the application of rapid prototyping methods in the manufacture casting tools. Methods described included stereolithography, laser sintering and sand cast moulding. Amongst the case studies were descriptions of the production of a novel A‐post for the Volvo Safety Concept car, the production and ranking for accuracy and repeatability of aerospace components and the direct production of sand moulds for cylinder heads and a hydraulic valve.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1954

THE photographs reproduced on this and the following page show some of the main stages in the production of precision castings by the lost wax process, as carried out at…

Abstract

THE photographs reproduced on this and the following page show some of the main stages in the production of precision castings by the lost wax process, as carried out at the new Droitwich works of Deritend Precision Castings Ltd. The investment casting process is now widely used for the production of parts of intricate shape in materials difficult to machine, such as Stellite; stainless, tool and die steels, Nimonic alloys, and beryllium copper. Its application to gas turbine blades is well known.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 26 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

W.L. Yao and Ming C. Leu

This paper presents a numerical and experimental investigation of ceramic shell cracking during the burnout process in investment casting with internally webbed laser…

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1338

Abstract

This paper presents a numerical and experimental investigation of ceramic shell cracking during the burnout process in investment casting with internally webbed laser stereolithography patterns. Considered are the cracking temperature of the ceramic shell, the buckling temperature of the web link, and the glass transition temperature of the epoxy resin. Our hypothesis is that shell cracking will occur if the ceramic rupture temperature is lower than the temperature of glass transition and the temperature of web buckling. This hypothesis is validated by a good agreement we obtained between experimental observations and numerical simulations. It is found that the shell cracking and web link buckling are strongly related to the cross‐sectional dimensions and span length of the web structure and the shell thickness, and that shell cracking can be prevented by buckling of the epoxy webbed pattern in early stages of the burnout process.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Dilip Sahebrao Ingole, Abhay Madhusudan Kuthe, Shashank B. Thakare and Amol S. Talankar

The purpose of this paper is to apply rapid prototyping (RP) philosophy as a technology transfer in industries to take its time and cost‐effective advantages for…

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2056

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply rapid prototyping (RP) philosophy as a technology transfer in industries to take its time and cost‐effective advantages for development of rapid tooling (RT).

Design/methodology/approach

Experimentations are performed for development of RT for sand casting, investment casting and plastic moulding applications.

Findings

This paper reports the procedures developed for manufacture of production tooling using RP. A cost/benefit model is developed to justify implementation of RP as a technology transfer in industries.

Research limitations/implications

The examples are limited to parts build by fused deposition modelling RP process. However, the concepts experimented may be applied for other RP processes.

Practical implications

RP has proved to be a cost‐effective and time‐efficient approach for development of RT, thereby ensuring possibility for technology transfer in casting as well as plastic industries.

Originality/value

This is the pioneer attempt towards quantifying RP benefits, in view of technology transfer. This paper presents original case studies and findings on the basis of experimentations performed in foundries.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Jaroslav Mackerle

This paper gives a review of the finite element techniques (FE) applied in the area of material processing. The latest trends in metal forming, non‐metal forming, powder…

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3689

Abstract

This paper gives a review of the finite element techniques (FE) applied in the area of material processing. The latest trends in metal forming, non‐metal forming, powder metallurgy and composite material processing are briefly discussed. The range of applications of finite elements on these subjects is extremely wide and cannot be presented in a single paper; therefore the aim of the paper is to give FE researchers/users only an encyclopaedic view of the different possibilities that exist today in the various fields mentioned above. An appendix included at the end of the paper presents a bibliography on finite element applications in material processing for 1994‐1996, where 1,370 references are listed. This bibliography is an updating of the paper written by Brannberg and Mackerle which has been published in Engineering Computations, Vol. 11 No. 5, 1994, pp. 413‐55.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

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97

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 74 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

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