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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Kaiyu Xie, Panpan Xia and Jie Wu

This paper aims to study whether the upstream foundry in the original design manufacturer (ODM) supply chain will violate the commission contract and engage in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study whether the upstream foundry in the original design manufacturer (ODM) supply chain will violate the commission contract and engage in the production of pirated products. Based on the conclusion, this study hopes to explain the phenomenon of pirated products in reality and provide management enlightenment for related companies.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand when will foundry violates the processing contract, this paper constructs a five-stage decision-making model, this study derives a model to get three situations and draw data images to describe the characteristics of decision-making by the foundry. Finally, this paper also considers some external supervision.

Findings

The results show that processing fee and other parameters (special cost, common cost, weakening factor and product difference) jointly determine the possibility of piracy by the foundry. Moreover, the external supervision mechanism has a significant effect on the piracy behavior of the foundry.

Research limitations/implications

The research provides some support for real business activities, which actually involve many participants and mechanisms. Thus, it could be interesting to explore more multi-stage and complex business methods in reality.

Practical implications

The analysis highlights less-concerned moral hazard behaviors in the ODM supply chain. By recreating the complex interactions of participants, the conclusion shed light on how should different roles deal with their risks and take actions in a real business environment.

Originality/value

The biggest contribution of this study is to discuss the issue of moral hazard in the ODM supply chain. Piracy initiated by foundries may be a new type of supply chain risk and should be paid attention to.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Paul Lynch, C.R. Hasbrouck, Joseph Wilck, Michael Kay and Guha Manogharan

This paper aims to investigate the current state, technological challenges, economic opportunities and future directions in the growing “indirect” hybrid manufacturing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the current state, technological challenges, economic opportunities and future directions in the growing “indirect” hybrid manufacturing ecosystem, which integrates traditional metal casting with the production of tooling via additive manufacturing (AM) process including three-dimensional sand printing (3DSP) and printed wax patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among 100 participants from foundries and AM service providers across the USA to understand the current adoption of AM in metal casting as a function of engineering specifications, production demand, volume and cost metrics. In addition, current technological and logistical challenges that are encountered by the foundries are identified to gather insight into the future direction of this evolving supply chain.

Findings

One of the major findings from this study is that hard tooling costs (i.e. patterns/core boxes) are the greatest challenge in low volume production for foundries. Hence, AM and 3DSP offer the greatest cost-benefit for these low volume production runs as it does not require the need for hard tooling to produce much higher profit premium castings. It is evident that there are major opportunities for the casting supply chain to benefit from an advanced digital ecosystem that seamlessly integrates AM and 3DSP into foundry operations. The critical challenges for adoption of 3DSP in current foundry operations are categorized into as follows: capital cost of the equipment, which cannot be justified due to limited demand for 3DSP molds/cores by casting buyers, transportation of 3DSP molds and cores, access to 3DSP, limited knowledge of 3DSP, limitations in current design tools to integrate 3DSP design principles and long lead times to acquire 3DSP molds/cores.

Practical implications

Based on the findings of this study, indirect hybrid metal AM supply chains, i.e. 3DSP metal casting supply chains is proposed, as 3DSP replaces traditional mold-making in the sand casting process flow, no/limited additional costs and resources would be required for qualification and certification of the cast parts made from three-dimensional printed sand molds. Access to 3DSP resources can be addressed by establishing a robust 3DSP metal casting supply chain, which will also enable existing foundries to rapidly acquire new 3DSP-related knowledge.

Originality/value

This original survey from 100 small and medium enterprises including foundries and AM service providers suggests that establishing 3DSP hubs around original equipment manufacturers as a shared resource to produce molds and cores would be beneficial. This provides traditional foundries means to continue mass production of castings using existing hard tooling while integrating 3DSP for new complex low volume parts, replacement parts, legacy parts and prototyping.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1973

J. Bagnall

January 15, 1973 Ironfoundry — Statutory duty — Breach — Noxious dust — Prolonged inhalation of noxious dust — Chronic lung illness — Employers' actual or constructive…

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Abstract

January 15, 1973 Ironfoundry — Statutory duty — Breach — Noxious dust — Prolonged inhalation of noxious dust — Chronic lung illness — Employers' actual or constructive knowledge of health hazard — Test to apply when determining constructive knowledge — Whether employer should be aware of recent medical or scientific knowledge — Factories Act, 1961 (9 & 10 Eliz.II, c.34), ss.4(l), 63(1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Chun‐chieh Wang, Mu‐hsuan Huang and Dar‐zen Chen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the characteristics and evolution of the technology‐dependence networks of leading semiconductor companies. By comparing and…

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1198

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the characteristics and evolution of the technology‐dependence networks of leading semiconductor companies. By comparing and contrasting technology‐dependence networks in the 6‐, 8‐ and 12‐inch chip eras, this study clarifies the differences among integrated device manufacturers (IDMs) and foundries, and among each company in different eras.

Design/methodology/approach

Leading companies were identified by technological crowdedness and technological prestige to avoid massive actors. Strong ties were extracted to avoid too many relationship ties at the company network level. Strong ties represented directional technology relationships among companies whose citation counts and relative citation rates were higher. The technology‐dependence network of leading companies in three chip eras was examined by social network analysis.

Findings

Technology dependence among IDMs was the weakest, and their technology dependence upon foundries decreased in the 12‐inch chip era. The highest technology interdependence appeared among foundries and the reduction of their dependence upon IDMs. Technology dependence is expanded primarily by foundries, significant among GlobalFoundries, TSMC, UMC, and VIS.

Practical implications

IDM could invite foundries with technology dependence to form a strategic consortium. That way, the foundries could monitor potential competitors with relationship of technology dependence; in an advanced sense, the foundries could make use of the network to practice commercial maneuvers and create competitive advantage. Scholars may also observe semiconductor manufacturing technology's evolving into the maturity stage of product life cycle by interpreting foundries' highly technology interdependent relationships.

Originality/value

This is the first study to use strong ties in patent citation networks to represent technology‐dependence relationships.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Suresh Prasad, Dinesh Khanduja and Surrender K. Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the applicability of lean and green practices to foundry industry in India for improving productivity and eliminating waste…

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1588

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the applicability of lean and green practices to foundry industry in India for improving productivity and eliminating waste, incorporating the sustainability into business performance measures.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used survey questionnaire method to collect data against 16 lean and green practices from 71 middle- to senior-level professionals belonging to Indian foundry industry. The survey instrument of lean and green practices was developed based on a number of sources from the literature and formal discussions with academicians and foundry industry professionals. The responses were received on a five-point Likert scale ranging from least applicable to most applicable. Exploratory factor and reliability analyses are conducted to obtain and validate constructs and measure each constructs Cronbach’s α (i.e. a consistency coefficient). The lean and green practices are categorized into the four constructs, namely, workplace organization practices, management practices, inventory control practices, and industrial manufacturing and quality improvement practices. Further, descriptive statistics is employed to find out the relative significance of lean and green practices.

Findings

Factor and reliability analyses show that all four constructs are adequate and reliable to illustrate lean and green practices. Descriptive statistics indicates that lean and green practices are applicable for implementation to a certain extent in the foundry industry. Correlation analysis shows that lean practices are positively and moderately interrelated with green practices. Thus, the results present a strong evidence that lean and green practices are moderately applicable for implementation in the foundry industry.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into the applicability of lean and green practices implementation in the context of a developing country and presents evidence that lean and green practices are moderately applicable in the foundry industry. In addition, this paper is one of the few efforts to promote sustainable development within the industry.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

S. Fore and C.T. Mbohwa

The purpose of the paper is to illustrate application of the cleaner production concept so as to incorporate environmental protection into business performance. The study…

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1543

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to illustrate application of the cleaner production concept so as to incorporate environmental protection into business performance. The study analyses areas pertaining to the foundry industry that impact negatively on the environment leading to unsustainable resource utilisation and suggests options for promoting sustainable development within the industry, with specific focus on a foundry in a lower income country (LIC).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using the cleaner production (CP) Methodology. Pre‐assessment and assessment was carried out and options generated. The options included both low cost and capital intensive approaches.

Findings

The paper finds that the CP approach adopted provides clear guidance for generating options and can be used as a practical basis for managerial decision making and policy formulation. Of major concern is resource depletion and pollution associated with the foundry processes. Used resin sand contains toxic chemicals cause leaching and as such, reclamation of resin sand is suggested. There is need for low income countries (LIC's) to identify the best available technologies (BAT's) that are available within the foundry industry and take these aboard or better still improve on them.

Research limitations/implications

This research developed environmental options that can be applied in the foundry industry. However, it can be said that the findings may have limited global application since the analysis was carried out at one Foundry Company.

Practical implications

The paper focuses on a single foundry factory, since the case study approach was used. As such, environmental indicators and options may vary, since the processes from one foundry to another are bound to differ.

Originality/value

This paper is an attempt at combining theoretical and practical ideas to cover the scope of sustainable manufacturing in the setting of a developing country with a view to identify the lessons that can be learnt and to identify the points of departure when compared with studies done elsewhere. The work informs cleaner production assessment at any level, with a focus of production experiences in the foundry industry in a lower technology, developing economy that is less industrialized. The paper establishes a framework of options that can be applied in the foundry industry and other pollution‐intensive industries.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

A.J. Griffiths, P.S. Cheema and D.R. Towill

The UK cast iron foundry industry is surveyed in terms of past performance, present situation and future trends. The traditional “feast or famine” image is discussed in…

Abstract

The UK cast iron foundry industry is surveyed in terms of past performance, present situation and future trends. The traditional “feast or famine” image is discussed in terms of the actions required to improve quality, customer relationships and performance. The article highlights these relationships through its markets, business performance, process route and techological developments that support a new, streamlined, cost‐effective and efficient foundry industry of the 1990s.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Brian W. Rooks

Foundries have made massive investments in computerized casting systems. Suggests that Cosworth Castings, Worcester, and VAW West Yorkshire Foundry, Leeds, are setting new…

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369

Abstract

Foundries have made massive investments in computerized casting systems. Suggests that Cosworth Castings, Worcester, and VAW West Yorkshire Foundry, Leeds, are setting new standards in foundry automation.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

H. Sekhar and R. Mahanti

The aim of the research is to use an integrated approach – simulation and Six Sigma to improve the ambient air quality.

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1874

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the research is to use an integrated approach – simulation and Six Sigma to improve the ambient air quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Integration of simulation and Six Sigma DMAIC methodology in a foundry had been used to improve the ambient air quality. Various elements of the Six Sigma toolkit such as Cause and Effect diagrams and Failure Mode and Effect Analysis have been used to discover the root causes underlying the problem and prioritize action and incorporate cost‐effective solutions. Simulation has been used to improve and control the environmental efficiency by monitoring the performance of the Venturi Scrubber – the pollution control equipment, by running the model under varying conditions.

Findings

The integrated application of Six Sigma and simulation has been successful in reducing particulate emissions from 200 milligrams per cubic meter to less than 20 milligrams per cubic meter and sulphur dioxide emissions from 45 milligrams per cubic meter to less than 4.5 milligrams per cubic meter, thus reducing air pollution.

Practical implications

Air pollution is a burning problem in the present scenario and foundry industries are one of the contributors to air quality degradation. The approach described in this paper is a step towards reducing air pollution due to foundry operations.

Originality/value

Integration of Six Sigma DMAIC methodology and simulation provides a novel cost‐effective strategy for monitoring and reducing air pollution resulting from foundry operations. This paper is useful for environmental division of foundry and other manufacturing industries.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Yung‐Ta Li, Mu‐Hsuan Huang and Dar‐Zen Chen

Foundry, Design House, and integrated device manufacturers (IDM) are major characters in the semiconductor industry value chain. The purpose of this paper is to discuss…

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2372

Abstract

Purpose

Foundry, Design House, and integrated device manufacturers (IDM) are major characters in the semiconductor industry value chain. The purpose of this paper is to discuss patterns of characters' evolution in technology through patents classified as wafer‐design application patents and wafer‐process patents.

Design/methodology/approach

Various patent indicators, such as average patent citation count, and the combination of the average patent citation count and relative patent count share were used to measure the patent activity, patent quality, and the combination of the patent quality and relative patent activity share, respectively. The study period (1979‐2009) was divided into three major technology or wafer size eras, 1979‐1991 for the 6‐ and pre 6‐inch wafer era, 1989‐1999 for the 8‐inch wafer era, and 1997‐2009 for the 12‐inch wafer era.

Findings

Foundry has gradually become the technology transferor rather than purely the manufacturing capacity provider. Foundry's impact on the technology level has risen steeply on both the wafer‐process technology fields and the wafer‐design application technology fields. As a result, IDM, traditionally considered the primary technology contributor in the semiconductor value chain for the past 30 years, will continue to be challenged in the semiconductor industry.

Practical implications

Some hypotheses are clarified to provide managerial implications for the semiconductor industry. Owing to Foundry's rise in technology activity and quality, IDM/Design House should not merely view it as one of their capacity providers but should also pursue a technology alliance with it.

Originality/value

The paper clarifies the traditional hypotheses of the characters of technology in the semiconductor value chain.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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