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Article

Su-Fen Chiu, Shih-Pin Yeh and Tun Chun Huang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among role stressors, social support, and employee deviance. Specifically, this study explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships among role stressors, social support, and employee deviance. Specifically, this study explores the relationships of role stressors (i.e. role conflict, role ambiguity, and role overload) to interpersonal and organisational employee deviance. Furthermore, this study examines the moderating role of social support (from supervisors and coworkers) on the above relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 326 paired samples of sales and customer service employees as well as their immediate supervisors in Taiwan.

Findings

Role conflict had a positive relationship with both organisational and interpersonal deviance. Role ambiguity was positively, while role overload was negatively related to organisational deviance, respectively. Role ambiguity was more strongly related to organisational than to interpersonal deviance. Coworker support had a significant moderating effect on the role overload – interpersonal deviance relationship.

Practical implications

Organisations may implement policies and programs, such as clarification of job responsibility, provision of performance feedback and training in stress coping techniques, to lessen the negative effect of role conflict, and role ambiguity on employee deviance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in several ways. First, this study extends prior research on stressor-performance relationship by investigating the effect of role stressors on two forms of employee deviance (interpersonal deviance and organisational deviance) in a collectivist cultural context (i.e. Taiwan). Second, this study demonstrates that work-related characteristics (e.g. role stressors) have different degrees of effect on interpersonal and organisational deviance. Third, this research offers explanations on why there is little support for the moderating effect of social support on the stressor-deviance relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Sajeet Pradhan and Lalatendu Kesari Jena

Unlike most empirical investigations that have tested the relationship between abusive supervision and subordinate’s workplace deviance in a large and formal…

Abstract

Purpose

Unlike most empirical investigations that have tested the relationship between abusive supervision and subordinate’s workplace deviance in a large and formal organizational setup, this study investigates the effect of abusive behavior of owner-manager of small entrepreneurial establishments on subordinate’s workplace deviance. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it explores the moderating effect of intention to quit on the relationship between abusive supervision and organizational as well as interpersonal deviance; and second, it investigates whether the moderating effect between abusive supervision and intention to quit will be stronger for organizational deviance (supervisor directed) than for interpersonal deviance (others directed).

Design/methodology/approach

The participants of this study were 240 restaurant and hotel employees working in three small entrepreneurial organizations in the eastern state of India. The authors have collected data on the predictor and criterion variables at two time points with a separation of three to four weeks for reducing common method bias (Podsakoff et al., 2012). At Time 1, participants completed measures of the perception of their owner-manager’s abusiveness and their intention to quit. At Time 2, participants responded to organizational deviance and interpersonal deviance.

Findings

The findings of the study is in line with previous research studies (Tepper et al., 2007; Thau et al., 2009) that reported intention to quit will moderate the positive relationship between abusive supervision and organizational deviance and interpersonal deviance such that the relationship will be stronger when intention to quit is high rather than low. The finding of the study also corroborates the prediction that the interactive effect between abusive supervision and intention to quit will be stronger for organizational deviance (supervisor directed) than for interpersonal deviance (aimed at other members of the organization) when intention to quit is higher.

Originality/value

This study is among the very few empirical research studies that have investigated the effect of abusiveness of owner-manager on subordinate’s workplace deviance in small organizations. Another unique aspect of the study is that it is one of few to propose and test, how (whether organizational deviance or/and interpersonal deviance) and to what extent (more organizational or supervisor directed than interpersonal or others directed deviance) subordinates of abusive supervisor retaliate by engaging in workplace deviant behaviors.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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Article

Pooja Malik and Usha Lenka

This study aims to provide a review of antecedents of destructive deviance and classify them into three levels, namely, personal, interpersonal and organizational level in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a review of antecedents of destructive deviance and classify them into three levels, namely, personal, interpersonal and organizational level in the proposed integrated conceptual framework. Furthermore, it proposes three levels of interventions to prevent or modify destructive deviance.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic literature review of the past 23 years was carried out for the current study to identify the antecedents of destructive deviance.

Findings

This study proposes an integrated conceptual framework incorporating three levels of antecedents and interventions for overcoming destructive deviance. Findings classified the antecedents of destructive deviance into three categories, namely, personal, interpersonal and organizational level variables. Similarly, the proposed interventions were classified into three levels, namely, individual (employee resilience, mindfulness), interpersonal (mentoring, peer support) and organizational-level interventions (talent management, internal corporate communication) that organizations should concentrate on to reduce destructive deviance and facilitate health and well-being of employees.

Practical implications

This study posits three-level interventions to reduce or transform negative characteristics and overcome the negative impact of interpersonal and organizational level antecedents on destructive deviance among employees. The suggested three-level interventions not only reduce the negative characteristics and transform negative behaviors but also lay a significant pavement for fostering positive emotions among employees.

Originality/value

This study classifies the antecedents of destructive deviance into three categories, namely, personal, interpersonal and organizational-level antecedents. Further, this study offers three-level interventions for overcoming destructive deviance among employees.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Content available
Article

Michael Olalekan Adeoti, Faridahwati Mohd Shamsudin and AlHamwan Mousa Mohammad

The purpose of the present study was twofold: (1) to examine the direct effect of the dimensions of opportunity (i.e. ethical climate and institutional policy) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study was twofold: (1) to examine the direct effect of the dimensions of opportunity (i.e. ethical climate and institutional policy) and dimensions of job pressure (i.e. workload and work pressure) on workplace deviance (i.e. organisational and interpersonal deviance) and (2) to assess the mediation of neutralisation in the relationship between the dimensions of opportunity, job pressure and workplace deviance.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study drew from the fraud triangle theory (FTT; Cressey, 1950) and the theory of neutralisation (Sykes and Matza, 1957) to achieve the research objectives. Survey data from 356 full-time faculty members in Nigerian public universities were collected. Partial least square-structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was employed to analyse the data.

Findings

The results indicated that opportunity and job pressure significantly affected workplace deviance. As expected, neutralisation was found to mediate the negative relationship between ethical climate and interpersonal deviance and the positive relationship between workload, work pressure and interpersonal deviance. Contrary to expectation, neutralisation did not mediate the relationship between opportunity, pressure and organisational deviance.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was drawn from academics in public universities and the cross-sectional nature of this study means that the findings have limited generalisations.

Practical implications

This study offers insights into the management of Nigerian public universities on the need to curb workplace deviance amongst faculty members. This study recommends that the management improve the work environment by enhancing the ethical climate and institutional policies and reviewing the existing workload that may constitute pressure to the faculty members.

Originality/value

The present study provides empirical support for the fraud triangle theory and theory of neutralisation to explain workplace deviance.

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8451

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Article

Olga L. Clark and Benjamin M. Walsh

Research has consistently shown that organizational constraints lead to deviant behavioral reactions. Although many studies have investigated personality variables as…

Abstract

Purpose

Research has consistently shown that organizational constraints lead to deviant behavioral reactions. Although many studies have investigated personality variables as moderators of such predictors of deviance, considerably less research has considered cross-level moderators of these effects. The purpose of this paper is to draw on several related theories to test team civility climate as a cross-level moderator of the organizational constraints – interpersonal deviance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using paper-and-pencil surveys from 239 employees nested within 68 work teams. Teams were employed in various industries including healthcare, insurance, manufacturing/engineering, and financial services.

Findings

Results from hierarchical linear modeling analyses demonstrated that the effect of organizational constraints on interpersonal deviance varied significantly across teams. In addition, the positive relationship between organizational constraints and interpersonal deviance was attenuated in teams with a high civility climate.

Practical implications

Organizational constraints may be difficult to eliminate in many workplaces. However, results suggest that by developing a positive civility climate, teams can help prevent deviant behaviors that may be associated with experienced constraints.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to examine civility climate as a shared property of the team and as a cross-level moderator. Findings from this research contribute to theories of deviant organizational behavior by highlighting the critical role of variables emanating from levels of analysis beyond the individual.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Pooja Malik and Usha Lenka

This paper aims to propose an integrated conceptual framework depicting the antecedents of workplace deviance. This framework demonstrates three broad categories of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose an integrated conceptual framework depicting the antecedents of workplace deviance. This framework demonstrates three broad categories of antecedents of workplace deviance incorporating individual, interpersonal and organizational antecedents. The identified antecedents were later ranked in the order of their impact on workplace deviance.

Design/methodology/approach

PRISMA diagram was used to conduct the systematic literature review and identify the antecedents of workplace deviance. The identified antecedents were later ranked using analytic hierarchy process (AHP). For AHP, data were collected from 20 HR managers and academicians employed in various Indian organizations and institutes.

Findings

This study identified three categories of antecedents of workplace deviance, namely, organizational, interpersonal and individual antecedents. Results of AHP indicated that organizational antecedents have the most significant role in overcoming workplace deviance (18.92 per cent), which was followed by individual (1.47 per cent) and interpersonal level antecedents (1.28 per cent).

Practical implications

This study posits that organizations should avoid unfavorable exchange with its employees by providing suitable organizational and interpersonal practices and by conducting ethical programs and workshops to discourage deviant practices. Moreover, organizations should conduct integrity tests, personality assessment tests to avoid individuals with negative personality characteristics.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature on workplace deviance by identifying and classifying all the proposed antecedents of literature in an integrated framework. Moreover, this study used techniques of PRISMA and AHP, which represents novelty in the literature of workplace deviance.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

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Article

Hong Zhu, Yijing Lyu and Yijiao Ye

This study aims to examine the effect of workplace sexual harassment (WSH) on hospitality employees’ workplace deviance and family undermining behaviors by focusing on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of workplace sexual harassment (WSH) on hospitality employees’ workplace deviance and family undermining behaviors by focusing on the mediating effect of depression.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a three-phase field survey to collect data from hotels in China with a final sample of 266 hospitality employees. Data analysis techniques include descriptive statistics, confirmative factor analysis and hierarchical multiple regression.

Findings

This research finds that WSH is positively related to workplace deviance; WSH positively affects family undermining; depression is a mediator in the relationship between WSH and workplace deviance; and depression mediates the relationship between WSH and family undermining.

Originality/value

First, this research goes beyond the existing WSH literature by extending outcome variables to workplace deviance. Second, it is among the first to investigate the relationship between WSH and hospitality employees’ family life. Third, the examination of depression as a mediator advances the literature by unraveling the mediating mechanism underlying the effects of WSH on hospitality employees.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Guglielmo Faldetta

This study aims to explore the process that, from abusive supervision, leads to the different kinds of workplace deviant behaviors, using the norm of negative reciprocity…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the process that, from abusive supervision, leads to the different kinds of workplace deviant behaviors, using the norm of negative reciprocity as the main mechanism that can trigger this process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a literature review from organizational behavior and reciprocity fields and builds a theoretical model on the relationship between abusive supervision and workplace deviance within organizations.

Findings

This study develops a theoretical model where abusive supervision causes a feeling of injustice, which can motivate employees to seek revenge in the form of workplace deviant behaviors. Moreover, negative direct balanced reciprocity will moderate the relationship between the desire for revenge and minor interpersonal workplace deviance; negative direct non-balanced reciprocity will moderate the relationship between the desire for revenge and severe interpersonal workplace deviance; negative generalized balanced reciprocity will moderate the relationship between the desire for revenge and minor organizational workplace deviance; negative generalized non-balanced reciprocity will moderate the relationship between the desire for revenge and severe organizational workplace deviance.

Originality/value

Previous studies have used negative reciprocity as a moderator, but for the first time, it is split in direct and generalized and in balanced and non-balanced. In particular, when direct negative reciprocity is present, the revenge will take the form of interpersonal workplace deviance; when generalized negative reciprocity is present, the revenge will take the form of organizational workplace deviance. On the other side, when balanced reciprocity is present, revenge will take the form of minor workplace deviance, while when non-balanced reciprocity is present, revenge will take the form of severe workplace deviance.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Content available
Article

Aaron Cohen and Sari Ehrlich

Constructive deviance is a behavior that can contribute to the effectiveness of an organization despite its problematic nature. Too few studies have examined the…

Abstract

Purpose

Constructive deviance is a behavior that can contribute to the effectiveness of an organization despite its problematic nature. Too few studies have examined the correlates of this behavior. The purpose of this study is to examine variables that represent exchange and organizational culture and their relationship to supervisor-reported and self-reported constructive deviance.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from 602 employees (a response rate of 67 per cent) in a large municipality in central Israel. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses were performed for each of the dependent variables (three self-reported constructive deviances and three supervisor-reported constructive deviance) controlling for divisions and departments.

Findings

The findings showed that self-reported constructive deviance was explained much better by the independent variables than supervisor-reported deviance. Organizational justice and moral identity had a strong direct effect on constructive deviance (self-reported). The mediation effect showed that an organizational climate for innovation had the strongest mediation effect among the mediators. Psychological contract breach was found to have a limited effect on constructive deviance.

Practical implications

Organizations should encourage procedural justice to encourage their employees to act in support of the organization, whether openly (formal performance) or more secretly (constructive deviance). Also, organizations should support innovation climate if they want to increase constructive deviance of their employees.

Originality/value

In a time when innovation and creativity are gaining increasing importance as behaviors that contribute to organizational success, more research on constructive deviance is expected. This study increases our understanding of this important concept stimulates additional studies of it.

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Article

Saravana Jaikumar and Avina Mendonca

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to broaden the understanding of the three negative member (bad apple) behaviors – withholding of effort, interpersonal deviance and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to broaden the understanding of the three negative member (bad apple) behaviors – withholding of effort, interpersonal deviance and negative affect – put forth by Felps et al. (2006).

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative review of extant literature was conducted to understand the impact of the negative member behaviors on other team members. Potential interventions to control this bad apple behavior are identified with supporting evidence from recent empirical studies.

Findings

A review of empirical findings in the literature indicate that perceived coworker loafing may lead to counterproductive work behavior toward coworkers and interpersonal deviance may affect the task cohesion of the group. However, the presence of affectively negative individuals is empirically proven to improve the group performance, especially when the group task is related to creativity or information processing (decision-making and idea generation).

Originality/value

Despite the empirical attention paid to “bad apple” behaviors, the implications for managing negative member behaviors are unclear and scattered. In this paper, building on the framework proposed by Felps et al. (2006), the authors focus on three behaviors and provide a concise review of literature and interventions to control or exploit these behaviors.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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