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1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2022

Sajani Thapa, Satyendra C. Pandey, Swati Panda, Audhesh K. Paswan and Ashish Ghimire

Vaping has become a prominent public health problem that has impacted young adults. The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the effects of different intrinsic…

Abstract

Purpose

Vaping has become a prominent public health problem that has impacted young adults. The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the effects of different intrinsic and extrinsic motivations on young adults’ realization of excessive vaping and their intention to quit vaping.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was used to collect data from 232 young vapers (primarily Generation Z and Millennials) to test the hypothesized relationships using a covariance-based structural equation model.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that “realization of excessive vaping” is negatively associated with “sensation seeking” and positively associated with “deal proneness,” “environmental cues” and “negative repercussion.” The “intention to quit vaping” is negatively associated with “marketing cues” and positively associated with “alternative to smoking” and “environmental cues.” Finally, the “realization of excessive vaping” is positively associated with “intention to quit vaping.”

Originality/value

This study takes a two-dimensional approach to understand the complex motivations behind a relatively new addictive behavior – vaping. It contributes to the literature of addictive behavior, social cognitive theory and theory of planned behavior. Further, it has important implications for public policy and the marketing of addictive products to youths.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Khaled Aladwan, Ramudu Bhanugopan and Alan Fish

This study proposed to investigate the phenomenon of intention to quit among frontline employees. The main objectives of the current study were to examine the level of…

1950

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposed to investigate the phenomenon of intention to quit among frontline employees. The main objectives of the current study were to examine the level of intention to leave and what factors influence the employees to consider leaving their organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 493 frontline employees from Jordanian organisations. The study reported in this paper tested the factor structure of intention to quit using exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The findings which emerged from this study established a three‐factor solution model which is appropriate to test employees’ intention to quit based on three factors, namely work opportunities, personal needs, and personal responsibilities. The results provided new perspectives and support the overall validity of the nomological network of intention to quit factors, but also suggest that caution should be exercised in different contexts and cultural settings.

Originality/value

The present study emphasises the need to expand the focus on intention to quit research beyond attitudinal and relational factors. Theoretical implications, limitations and directions for future research are discussed.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Gianfranco Walsh and Boris Bartikowski

Service employees frequently engage in emotional labour to express emotions to customers that conform with organizational display rules. Previous studies report equivocal…

5542

Abstract

Purpose

Service employees frequently engage in emotional labour to express emotions to customers that conform with organizational display rules. Previous studies report equivocal findings regarding the relationships among emotional labour, job satisfaction, and quitting intentions. This paper aims to shed additional light on the links by distinguishing two dimensions of emotional labour and predicting that job satisfaction mediates its relationship with quitting intentions, while gender and age moderate its relationship with job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional survey data from German service employees, entered into a structural equation model, test the study ' s hypotheses.

Findings

Job satisfaction partially mediates relationships between emotional labour and quitting intentions. Deep acting positively affects the job satisfaction of male but not female service employees. The surface acting-job satisfaction link is negative for female but not male service employees. The deep acting-job satisfaction link also is stronger for younger than for older service workers.

Research limitations/implications

Conservation of resources theory complements and extends previous service research focused on employee-related outcomes of emotional labour.

Practical implications

The findings improve service managers ' understanding of how employees ' emotional labour drive job satisfaction and employee turnover.

Originality/value

This study is the first to consider both gender and age as moderators that help explain employee quitting intentions, as well as the first to find a positive effect of deep and surface acting on quitting intentions.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Sajeet Pradhan and Lalatendu Kesari Jena

Unlike most empirical investigations that have tested the relationship between abusive supervision and subordinate’s workplace deviance in a large and formal…

Abstract

Purpose

Unlike most empirical investigations that have tested the relationship between abusive supervision and subordinate’s workplace deviance in a large and formal organizational setup, this study investigates the effect of abusive behavior of owner-manager of small entrepreneurial establishments on subordinate’s workplace deviance. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it explores the moderating effect of intention to quit on the relationship between abusive supervision and organizational as well as interpersonal deviance; and second, it investigates whether the moderating effect between abusive supervision and intention to quit will be stronger for organizational deviance (supervisor directed) than for interpersonal deviance (others directed).

Design/methodology/approach

The participants of this study were 240 restaurant and hotel employees working in three small entrepreneurial organizations in the eastern state of India. The authors have collected data on the predictor and criterion variables at two time points with a separation of three to four weeks for reducing common method bias (Podsakoff et al., 2012). At Time 1, participants completed measures of the perception of their owner-manager’s abusiveness and their intention to quit. At Time 2, participants responded to organizational deviance and interpersonal deviance.

Findings

The findings of the study is in line with previous research studies (Tepper et al., 2007; Thau et al., 2009) that reported intention to quit will moderate the positive relationship between abusive supervision and organizational deviance and interpersonal deviance such that the relationship will be stronger when intention to quit is high rather than low. The finding of the study also corroborates the prediction that the interactive effect between abusive supervision and intention to quit will be stronger for organizational deviance (supervisor directed) than for interpersonal deviance (aimed at other members of the organization) when intention to quit is higher.

Originality/value

This study is among the very few empirical research studies that have investigated the effect of abusiveness of owner-manager on subordinate’s workplace deviance in small organizations. Another unique aspect of the study is that it is one of few to propose and test, how (whether organizational deviance or/and interpersonal deviance) and to what extent (more organizational or supervisor directed than interpersonal or others directed deviance) subordinates of abusive supervisor retaliate by engaging in workplace deviant behaviors.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Martin Gächter, David A. Savage and Benno Torgler

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workplace factors and the intentions of police officers to quit their current department.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between workplace factors and the intentions of police officers to quit their current department.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a survey of Baltimore officers, designed to examine the relationship between police stress and domestic violence in police families were used. Using multivariate regression analysis, the authors focus on the officers' stated intentions to look for alternative employment, with proxies for social and workplace factors.

Findings

Higher levels of cooperation (trust), interactional justice and work‐life‐balance reduce police officers' intentions to quit. While high levels of physical and psychological strain and trauma are not correlated with intentions to quit.

Research limitations/implications

A discernible limitation of this study is the age of the data analyzed and that many changes have occurred in recent times (policing and social). It would be of great interest to repeat this study to gauge the true effect.

Practical implications

There are policy implications for retention and recruitment: it may possible to decrease the ethnic and gender gaps, through identifying officers at risk and creating programs to hold existing minorities, recruit more, whilst maintaining a strong, happy and healthy department.

Originality/value

This study examines the impact of workplace factors on quitting intention for police officers. It is demonstrated that social capital, fairness and work‐life balance are moderators for quitting, adding to the literature on worker retention, as little research has been done using multivariate analysis on quitting intentions.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Mohammed Laid Ouakouak, Bindu Arya and Michel Zaitouni

While some work on how employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) affect behavioral outcomes has been examined, less work simultaneously investigates…

Abstract

Purpose

While some work on how employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) affect behavioral outcomes has been examined, less work simultaneously investigates whether employee perceptions of internal and external CSR influence the behavioral outcomes of incumbent employees working in organizations. The purpose of this paper is to draw on social exchange theory arguments to investigate the direct and indirect effects of internal and external CSR practices on employee organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and intention to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was conducted among 664 employees working in the banking sector in Kuwait. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to test the suggested hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal that both internal and external CSR activities are positively related to OCB and OCB is negatively associated with intention to quit. Results also show that distributive justice moderates the relationship between OCB and intention to quit.

Practical implications

These findings extend the literature on CSR and demonstrate that organizations engaged in CSR activities (internal and external) can enhance citizenship behaviors among employees and thereby increase retention rates.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates the importance of CSR activities in tax-free countries, particularly, in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region. Since employees in GCC countries are increasingly concerned about the CSR behaviors of organizations, CSR activities can allow local organizations to signal that they are good corporate citizens. Hence, CSR could be considered as a particularly critical source of competitive advantage for businesses in the region.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Sajeet Pradhan and Lalatendu Kesari Jena

Several studies have investigated the harmful effects of abusive supervision on subordinates’ behaviour and performance, including their intention to quit. However, there…

1018

Abstract

Purpose

Several studies have investigated the harmful effects of abusive supervision on subordinates’ behaviour and performance, including their intention to quit. However, there is a conspicuous dearth of empirical studies testing the deleterious interpersonal relationship, especially in Indian organizations. The purpose of this study is to explore the moderating role of meaningful work as a neutralizer in mitigating the pernicious effect of abusive supervision on subordinates’ turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from software professionals working in several Indian IT companies through self-report questionnaires (n = 227), using a time-lagged design on two occasions (span between T1 and T2 was three to four weeks).

Findings

The result confirms that abusive supervision is strongly related to subordinates’ intention to quit. Also, the study finds meaningful work to have a significant moderating effect on the relationship between abusive supervision and intention to quit.

Originality/value

The number of empirical studies exploring the pernicious effect of abusive supervision in Indian organizational context is almost negligible. In addition, the current study is among the few studies that have investigated the moderating effect of meaningful work on the relationship between abusive supervision and intention to quit.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Mohan Raju Pamu

The purpose of this paper is to identify what job‐related, individual, and profession‐related variables cause the intention to quit teaching among the early career…

2160

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify what job‐related, individual, and profession‐related variables cause the intention to quit teaching among the early career teachers, especially teachers of Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

Quit intentions were measured adapting the scale developed by Mueller and Lawler, and 11 profession‐related and person‐related job variables were measured by author‐developed and literature‐derived scale items on a five‐point Likert scale, along with five status variables. Data were analyzed from a sample of 308 early career teachers belonging to secondary and preparatory schools of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Findings

An alarming 53 per cent sample expressed high quit intention whereas only 13 per cent teachers showed low quit intentions. Choice satisfaction (accounting 44 per cent variance), availability of other job opportunities (23 per cent variance), perceived status (15 per cent variance), and self‐accountability (13 per cent variance) emerged as predictor variables. None of the five status variables emerged as significant predictors. Commitment to teaching profession was not a significant predictor, suggesting the two concepts independent of each other.

Research limitations/implications

Providing freedom of choice at entry level to teaching profession coupled with enhancing rigour in pre‐service education was suggested as major steps required for decreasing high‐level quit intentions.

Practical implications

Education policy needs to be such that for preparation of teachers of secondary and preparatory level, pre‐service teacher education students should have attained maturity of adulthood with a minimum academic attainment of a post‐undergraduate level or a post‐graduate level. This is to enable early career teachers to handle adolescence‐level school students by being equipped with better skills learned during pre‐service teacher education.

Originality/value

The results are pertinent not only to Ethiopia but also to any less developed or a developing country, where “catch them early” policy is followed for pre‐service education and where less rigorous pre‐service education exists.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Sajeet Pradhan and Lalatendu Kesari Jena

Despite knowledge of the destructive effect of abusive supervision on several individual and organizational outcomes, the construct remains scarcely investigated…

1036

Abstract

Purpose

Despite knowledge of the destructive effect of abusive supervision on several individual and organizational outcomes, the construct remains scarcely investigated, especially in Indian organizations. Drawing upon the conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the linkage between abusive supervision (an interpersonal stressor) and subordinate’s intention to quit and to focuss on the moderating role of subordinate’s emotional intelligence as a neutralizer in curbing the pernicious effect of abusive supervision on subordinate’s intention to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants of this study were 353 healthcare professionals working in a large Indian hospital chain having all India presence. The authors have collected data on our predictor and criterion variables at two time points with a separation of three to four weeks for reducing common method bias (Podsakoff et al., 2012). At Time 1, participants rated the perception of their supervisor’s abusiveness and answered few demographic questions. At Time 2, participants completed measures of intention to quit and their emotional intelligence.

Findings

The finding of this study corroborates the assertion that subordinates who perceive their supervisors to be abusive have higher intension to quit organization. But surprisingly, this study reports that the moderating effect of emotional intelligence showed stronger relationship between abusive supervision and intention to quit when emotional intelligence is high than low.

Practical implications

Organization should take serious note of supervisors or managers that are abusive or are perceived to be abusive by their subordinates. As it is impossible to completely eradicate abusive and deviant supervisory behaviors at workplace, these toxic behaviors can be checked at several levels like hiring people high on emotional intelligence and through imparting emotional intelligence training and counseling to both the accused and the victim.

Originality/value

The study finds support to the relationship between abusive supervision and intention to quit in Indian context. The finding of this study fails to empirically corroborate the assumption that emotional intelligence will act as a neutralizer in mitigating the pernicious effect of abusive supervision on subordinates’ intention to quit.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Kristina Schoemmel and Thomas S. Jønsson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interactions and the usefulness of distinguishing among employees’ affective commitments (ACs) to the job, to the…

3098

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interactions and the usefulness of distinguishing among employees’ affective commitments (ACs) to the job, to the department, and to the organization in relation to the effects of quitting intentions and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey questionnaire in the Danish healthcare system (n=496).

Findings

First, the authors demonstrates that AC to the job, to the department, and to the organization is factorially distinct. Second, the authors finds that AC to the department is related to intention to quit the department and the organization, whereas AC to the job and to the organization is not when considered as part of the analysis. The authors test for interactions between AC to the job, to the department, and to the organization in relation to quitting intentions, and find these results to be non-significant. Third, the authors finds that AC to the job is more strongly related to job performance than AC to the department and to the organization. Furthermore, AC to the department and to the organization moderates the relationship between AC to the job and job performance.

Practical implications

The results may suggest that practitioners could profit from considering AC toward the department when preventing employees’ quitting intentions. Further, practitioners could benefit from enhancing AC to different targets, especially to the job, in order to increase employees’ job performance.

Originality/value

This research contributes to an understanding of how ACs to multiple workplace targets are different and how they interact.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000