Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Latisha Reynolds, Amber Willenborg, Samantha McClellan, Rosalinda Hernandez Linares and Elizabeth Alison Sterner

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of…

7126

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2016.

Findings

The paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

David Brennan and M. Elizabeth Davidson

While the important role of information literacy instruction as a central service in academic libraries is well observed in scholarly literature, there has been little examination…

Abstract

While the important role of information literacy instruction as a central service in academic libraries is well observed in scholarly literature, there has been little examination of the impact of the rapid increase of instructional duties on practicing librarians, whose traditional instruction duties have expanded or whose positions have not traditionally required leading a classroom. The study in this chapter explores librarians’ perceptions of the impact that increased instruction tasks have had on their day-to-day and long-term goals, perceptions of the support they receive in performing their instructional duties, and what types of instruction training they have received throughout their career. The ways in which the addition of instruction duties for librarians have been perceived by the librarians themselves as they strive to increase support for instructional services without impacting the library’s ability to continue to perform traditional public and technical services functions is discussed as a marker of the future needs of the field and the necessity of recognizing professional strain.

Details

Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-903-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Amanda Kathryn Nichols Hess

This article examines a structured redesign of one academic library's offering of its online learning objects. This process considered both improving the online learning objects…

1278

Abstract

Purpose

This article examines a structured redesign of one academic library's offering of its online learning objects. This process considered both improving the online learning objects and developing a feasible workflow process for librarians. The findings for both processes are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The scholarship on online library learning objects and web tutorials, beginning with Dewald's seminal study, was examined for trends, patterns, and best practices. From this research, informal interviews were conducted with library faculty members. Once this information had been collected, other public university libraries in the state of Michigan – 14 in all – were considered in terms of if, and how, they offered online learning objects and web tutorials. These three areas of inquiry provide a foundation for the best practices and workflows developed.

Findings

Based on the scholarship, librarian feedback, and informal assessment of other public university libraries' practices, best practices were developed for web tutorial evaluation and creation. These best practices are to make online learning content: maintainable, available, geared at users, informative, and customizable. Workflows for librarians around these best practices were developed. Also, using these best practices, the library redesigned its tutorials web page and employed a different content management tool, which benefitted both librarians and users with increased interactivity and ease of use.

Originality/value

This article shares best practices and library workflows for online learning objects in ways that are not commonly addressed in the literature. It also considers the library's online instructional presence from the perspectives of both user and librarian, and works to develop structures in which both can function effectively. This article is also of value because of the practical implications it offers to library professionals.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Anna Marie Johnson

This year’s annual bibliography includes materials reflecting various aspects of library instruction and information literacy. The academic literature continues to generate the…

4144

Abstract

This year’s annual bibliography includes materials reflecting various aspects of library instruction and information literacy. The academic literature continues to generate the greatest number of citations in these areas, but a small increase in the special libraries area was noted for 2000. The themes of standards for information literacy and assessment were apparent in all areas of the literature.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Hao‐Chang Sun, Kuan‐nien Chen, Chishu Tseng and Wen‐Hui Tsai

This paper aims to show how implementing new information technology has expanded the role of librarians as educators and how this role has matched the evolution of new technology.

5278

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how implementing new information technology has expanded the role of librarians as educators and how this role has matched the evolution of new technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at librarians' approaches to their role as educators and explores ways of most effectively implementing changes. By reviewing the literature and taking the old discourse around library education and information literacy, the paper reflects on the changing role of librarians in an era of greater access to technology, including Web 2.0.

Findings

Collaboration with faculty was found to be an essential feature of the most successful stories. Teaching students and faculty to use new information technologies may have become one of the major roles of librarians.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that the continual evolution of the web is causing a move from e‐libraries to mobile libraries, and that the educational role of the librarians must encompass this trend, and to anticipate similar future developments.

Details

New Library World, vol. 112 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 December 2017

Jennifer Poggiali

This paper reports on a grant-funded project to create a hand-drawn, custom-made animated character named Jasmyn. Drawing on animation theory, the purpose of this paper is to use…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports on a grant-funded project to create a hand-drawn, custom-made animated character named Jasmyn. Drawing on animation theory, the purpose of this paper is to use qualitative research to investigate student responses to the medium of animation, the character’s design, and three presentation strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers held three student focus groups to investigate the following research questions: Will students endorse animation as a medium for library instructional videos on the grounds of its entertaining, subversive, or playful qualities? Is Jasmyn designed and written in a way that engages students and compels them to respond to her as a character? How will students respond to three presentation strategies: a lecture-style video, a video with supplemental animations, and a real-time, interactive lesson?

Findings

The researchers found that students expressed broad enthusiasm for animation as a medium, though responses to Jasmyn’s personality were mixed. The only presentation strategy that prompted unique responses was the interactive session, although all three focus groups provided revealing commentary about online learning. Students also identified aspects of the animation and character that could be improved, and reflected on ways Jasmyn might be integrated into online learning.

Research limitations/implications

This study, performed as part of a pilot project, was deliberately small in scale. Clearer implications would emerge from repetition with a larger group of students.

Originality/value

Jasmyn may be the only hand-drawn, custom-made animated character created for library instruction. No research studies on the use of animation in libraries have been published to date.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Monica Maceli

Purpose – As the role of technology in libraries has broadened and expanded, tech-savvy librarians and non-librarian technologists are increasingly working side by side in complex…

Abstract

Purpose – As the role of technology in libraries has broadened and expanded, tech-savvy librarians and non-librarian technologists are increasingly working side by side in complex digital environments. Little research has explored the key differences between these roles and the implications for the future of the Master of Library Science (MLS) and its variant degrees, particularly as technologists from various backgrounds increasingly enter the information field. This chapter contrasts the technological responsibilities of the two groups to build an understanding of the necessity of the MLS in library-oriented technology work.

Design/Methodology/Approach – Qualitative coding and text mining techniques were used to analyze technology-oriented librarian and non-librarian job advertisements, technology curriculum changes, and surveyed technology interests of current information professionals.

Findings – Findings indicate a clear distinction between librarian and non-librarian technology responsibilities. Librarian positions emphasize web design, data and metadata, technology troubleshooting, and usage of library-oriented software. Non-librarian technologists require programming, database development, and systems administration, with deeper software and systems knowledge. Overlap was noted in the areas of user experience, linked data, and metadata. Several newer trends that information professionals expressed a desire to learn – such as makerspace technologies – were observed to be poorly covered in the technology curriculum, though the MLS curriculum generally covered the tech-savvy librarians’ responsibilities.

Originality/Value – This chapter builds understanding of the current necessity of the MLS in library-oriented technology work, as contrasted against the role of non-librarian technologists, through analysis of a triangulated set of data sources covering employment opportunities, technology curriculum, and librarianstechnology interests.

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-884-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Lynn Deeken, Meggan Press, Angie Thorpe Pusnik, Laura Birkenhauer, Nate Floyd, Lindsay Miller, Andrew Revelle, Jaclyn Spraetz, Christina Riehman-Murphy, Christie Flynn, Caitlin Gerrity, Stephanie J. Graves, Sarah LeMire, Anne Pemberton, Vonzell DeRico Yeager and Magen Bednar

This paper aims to demonstrate the variety of ways institutions and their libraries approach student success both conceptionally and operationally.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the variety of ways institutions and their libraries approach student success both conceptionally and operationally.

Design/methodology/approach

Librarians from nine different institutions of higher education were given a series of questions about student success on their campuses and in their libraries. They responded with written essays describing their experiences and perspectives.

Findings

The contributed pieces are collected together and display a shared interest in defining “student success,” aligning strategic planning with student success initiatives and establishing (and assessing) strong infrastructure to support student success.

Originality/value

These examples help us observe what is happening throughout higher education and see potential paths forward at our own institutions engaged in this work.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2006

Daphnée Rentfrow

Writing in 1995, what seems from our vantage point an almost primitive moment in technological evolution, hypertext theorist, and fiction writer Catherine Marshall, with her…

Abstract

Writing in 1995, what seems from our vantage point an almost primitive moment in technological evolution, hypertext theorist, and fiction writer Catherine Marshall, with her colleague David Levy, presciently described modern libraries;The academic and public libraries most of us have grown up with are the products of innovation begun approximately 150 years ago. We would find libraries that existed prior to that time largely unrecognizable. It is certain that the introduction of digital technologies will again transform libraries, possibly beyond recognition by transforming the mix of materials in their collections and the methods by which these materials are maintained and used. But the better word for these evolving institutions is “libraries,” not digital libraries, for ultimately what must be preserved is the heterogeneity of materials and practices. As library materials and practices of the past have been diverse—more diverse than idealized accounts allow—so they no doubt will remain in the future (Levy and Marshall, 1995, p. 77).By reminding us that libraries were always much more than repositories of collated pages of print, Levy and Marshall highlight the characteristics of modern libraries that mark them not as something new and different, but as something wholly in keeping with the diversity of “traditional” library holdings. “Our idealized image of a library imbues it with qualities of fixity and permanence. This is hardly surprising, since the library is considered to be the Home of the Book, and books are by and large one of the more fixed, more permanent types of documents,” the authors write, but “libraries have always contained materials other than books. Special collections and archives are filled with unbound and handwritten ephemera—correspondence, photographs, and so on … [And] traditional libraries have long contained a diversity of technologies and media; today these include film and video, microfilm and microfiche, vellum and papyrus” (p.77). Now that libraries contain various forms of digital media as standard parts of their collections (electronic journals, electronic catalogs, digital images, digitized sound files), the distinction between “traditional” and “digital” libraries has lost much of its original use, and so has the distinction between traditional and new types of librarians, the stewards of the libraries in any and all forms.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-007-4

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Richard J. Bazillion and Connie L. Braun

The advent and evolution of Web‐enhanced teaching is changing the relationships among classroom, library, and campus culture at many of our nation’s colleges and universities…

1076

Abstract

The advent and evolution of Web‐enhanced teaching is changing the relationships among classroom, library, and campus culture at many of our nation’s colleges and universities. Portable computing is increasing in such a way that wired campuses are more and more the norm. In response to portable computing, some faculty are taking time to create and develop Web‐enhanced courses so that students may enjoy the extensive electronic resources now available to them. Faculty development in the use of technology in the classroom, knowledge of scholarly electronic resources, and close collaboration with the library are transforming what happens in higher education. “Laptop” university pioneers are fine examples of the kind of collaboration that is necessary to ensure success in this arena.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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