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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Gwendolen Rochester Leighty

Fund‐raising is becoming an integral part of contemporary library management, particularly for academic and research libraries. Libraries are establishing or strengthening…

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Abstract

Fund‐raising is becoming an integral part of contemporary library management, particularly for academic and research libraries. Libraries are establishing or strengthening development operations and seeking information on best practices in fund‐raising. In response to this growing priority of library directors and deans, and to meet demand for a forum in which development staff can share ideas and successes with each other, the Academic Library Advancement and Development Network (ALADN) was formed in 1996. This article highlights: the origins and purpose of ALADN; prime benefits of ALADN to the profession of library development; and a summary of the 2001 ALADN Conference in Washington, DC.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Paul Cardwell

This paper seeks to describe an approach to staff development and workforce planning which is implemented as part of a process of internal reviews of service areas within…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to describe an approach to staff development and workforce planning which is implemented as part of a process of internal reviews of service areas within an academic library.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the factors leading to the development of such a process within the Deakin University Library.

Findings

A number of different factors – internal to the library, at the university level and in the wider environment – have driven the need for such reviews and influenced their design. The approach developed focuses on comparing current workforce capabilities (competencies and resource levels) with the set of competencies and resources required to deliver the projected services to the standards required. This account highlights the links between the review process and the implementation of a library‐wide staff development framework.

Practical implications

A number of practical implications may be drawn: the value of a flexible approach taking into account the local and institutional environment; the critical importance of organizational needs driving individual staff development and the benefits of mapping links from strategic goals to staff development.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on an emerging process for service delivery in an academic library.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Samuel T. Huang

The key to a successful library development and fundraising program is a synergistic relationship between development professionals and librarians. The purpose of this…

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2264

Abstract

Purpose

The key to a successful library development and fundraising program is a synergistic relationship between development professionals and librarians. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on the partnership in achieving the library mission and its fundraising goals.

Findings

The study finds that raising funds for any academic library requires commitment and leadership of the library dean and the development officer. With library faculty and staff members' input, the library development team must work together in writing a compelling case statement that has high dramatic and emotional impact on the mission of the library and the institution.

Originality/value

The paper identifies three key elements that library faculty and staff can provide to support any successful library development program.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Michael Lorenzen

Purpose – Although not extensively documented, academic libraries in the United States of America have been involved in fund-raising for centuries. In more recent years…

Abstract

Purpose – Although not extensively documented, academic libraries in the United States of America have been involved in fund-raising for centuries. In more recent years, decreases in university budgets forced academic libraries to rely more heavily on philanthropy in order to operate or expand collections. However, much remains unknown about many aspects of academic library fund-raising. This study expands knowledge regarding library development efforts so that scholars and library administrators can better understand library fund-raising and become more successful in raising money.

Findings – Development work for academic libraries has shown to differ from other forms of development activities on a campus due to the fact that donors to academic libraries tend to differ from other kinds of donors on a campus. This research highlights strategies academic library development officers believe work in cultivating donors from a limited target population and how they believe this differs from or is similar to the work of other development officers in higher education.

Practical and social implications – This research sought to understand how organizational placement of the library development officer in the university has an impact on successful fund-raising.

Originality/value – This is the first research to directly study academic library development officers. This will help library administrators and those involved with academic library development efforts learn what library development officers believe works and doesn’t work in fund-raising.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-313-1

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Julie Biando Edwards

In 2015, the UN General Assembly introduced the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In 2014, in anticipation of the SDGs, the International Federation of Library

Abstract

In 2015, the UN General Assembly introduced the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In 2014, in anticipation of the SDGs, the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) released the Lyon Declaration, asserting that the right to access information, and the skills to use it, is essential for development. Simply put, there can be no sustainable development without access to information. So, as the world looks toward sustainable development in the information age, what role should libraries play in meeting communities’ needs? Sustainable development, whether on a local or global scale, requires that people have access to information in order to improve their abilities to make informed choices about their lives, livelihoods, and communities. Sustainable development is important for all communities, everywhere, and access to information is just one way libraries can contribute to development initiatives. Libraries, especially public libraries, provide not only traditional access to information but also engaged services and programs that are community centered. This chapter will explore the ways in which the profession at large is plugging into the SDGs, with a particular focus on the work that IFLA is doing to connect libraries to development. It will highlight a specific form of community development – Asset-Based Community Development, which focuses on using the strengths and capacities that already exist in communities of all sizes and economic statuses – as a theoretical and practical model to help librarians understand and leverage their own assets as they collaborate with their communities on building individual and community capacity. It will argue that an asset-based approach to integrating our services into the larger trend of sustainable community development can provide us with both direction for day-to-day engagement with our communities and an important way to reimagine our value.

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Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-903-4

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Patrick Mapulanga

– The purpose of this paper is to look at staff development and its challenges in the University of Malawi Libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at staff development and its challenges in the University of Malawi Libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study design was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data. University Budget Estimates from 2004/2005 to 2010/2011 financial years were analysed. Data from the University of Malawi Strategic Plan 2005-2009 were examined. Interviews were conducted with college librarians in the University of Malawi Libraries. Documentary evidence was also used.

Findings

Study findings indicate that staff development in the University of Malawi Libraries has emphasised on professional qualification in Library and Information Studies. However, due to financial constraints, the majority of the library staff lacks LIS professional qualifications. This study recommends that libraries should consider budgeting for continuing professional development (CPD).

Practical implications

Staff development requires continuous funding and time. This study recommends the CPD approach to staff development in academic libraries. The study also recommends the introduction of an education levy to benefit skills and training needs for higher education institutions.

Originality/value

There is dearth of literature on staff development in academic libraries in Malawi. This paper seeks to recommend CPD.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Roger Brisson

The American Association of Universities/Association of Research Libraries (AAU/ARL) German Resources Project was reorganized in 1998 to include formal working…

Abstract

The American Association of Universities/Association of Research Libraries (AAU/ARL) German Resources Project was reorganized in 1998 to include formal working partnerships with German research libraries in pursuing its objective of cooperative collection development. The intent has been to make use of technological developments in telecommunications and computing in addressing the serious challenges arising from stagnant collection development budgets and rapidly rising prices of library materials. Because of their rich traditions and strong support, as well as their sharing similar aims with their American counterparts, German research libraries represent valuable international partners for ARL member libraries in fostering innovative research services for scholars. Explores the conceptual and historical background of cooperative collection development in North America, as well as of German publishing and library history, and in so doing delineates the many points of contact between American and German research libraries.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Ngozi Perpetua Osuchukwu and Philips Oluwaseun Ayeni

The services of the libraries are to disseminate information and create awareness on issues of importance in the society. Often times, it is not very clear on what and how…

Abstract

Purpose

The services of the libraries are to disseminate information and create awareness on issues of importance in the society. Often times, it is not very clear on what and how the entire community can be reached, thus denying some groups opportunities to be integrated toward actualization and contribution to the national development. The purpose of this paper is to examine the information activities provided by libraries and librarians in promoting development and social integration through identification of community members, harnessing the output indicators of what, where, when, why and how in engaging the people, investigating the constraints and the implications of the findings to community contribution toward national development.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was designed using Spidergram to incorporate 5Ws and H (who, what, when, where, why and how) in information engagement for social inclusion. There was no sampling as all the 88 participants have enriching discussion on sustainable development, filling the questionnaire that were structured on a four-point scale of strongly agree (SA), agree (A), disagree (D) and strongly disagree (SD). There was also the use of interview which the participants actively interfaced on. Data were collated and analyzed using frequency tables and mean scores with 2.5 benchmark set for acceptable or rejected item.

Findings

Result revealed that many people are unaware of national sustainable development but are willing to create spaces to be integrated in nation building. There is the need for libraries and librarians to provide information that goes beyond a simple consultation or support process but to expand into meaningful and inclusive collaborations, building stronger relationships and partnerships within the community. Participants expressed displeasure on late information, low literacy, lack of engagement from libraries and librarians, among others, and indicated that their meeting venues are excellent spaces for information activities.

Practical implications

If the community members are excluded from inclusive information participation, they will be denied of their fundamental rights to access to information. With that, they will not take their rightful place in sustainable national development. On the other hand, the libraries and librarians will continue to be relegated to the background. Since it has been established that many people need information and are willing to create spaces to get it, it is necessary that the best practices are adopted in adding values to national development.

Social implications

Disseminating information to wide groups of audience enhances free discussion which can lead to understanding of needs, mutual respect, problem solving and increase in knowledge of national development.

Originality/value

This research employs spidergram with the adoption of who, what, where, when, why and how (5Ws and H) in tracing the engagements of libraries/librarians in service provision for active national development. it provides a unique approach toward investigating the relevance of libraries and librarians in ensuring national development.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Keith Michael Fiels

Imagine, if you will, that the year 2010 has arrived, and that many of the wonderful things that librarians worked so hard for in the last half of the twentieth century…

Abstract

Imagine, if you will, that the year 2010 has arrived, and that many of the wonderful things that librarians worked so hard for in the last half of the twentieth century have come to pass. Libraries of all types, large and small, are linked through a network of automated systems, providing total bibliographic access to the holdings of every library. Better still, patrons now receive items in hours or days through a combination of telefacsimile and ultrafast delivery. To the users, each library has become a gateway to all resources held by all libraries, and library information services are “location transparent,” that is, the patron has little awareness of where a piece of information may in fact have come from—it may be from a library across the street or from one across the country.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Louise Mort Feldmann, Allison V. Level and Shu Liu

The aim of this paper is to describe a process undertaken by Colorado State University Libraries' (CSUL) faculty to address concerns regarding their leadership training…

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3101

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe a process undertaken by Colorado State University Libraries' (CSUL) faculty to address concerns regarding their leadership training and development opportunities within the Libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A Task Force (TF) under the direction of the Libraries Faculty Council (LFC) collected and examined feedback from the faculty librarians, reviewed professional literature, and made recommendations to the Libraries' administration and the Council.

Findings

Recommendations by the TF include: possible training initiatives, leadership role development, and improvement of organizational communication. The work of the TF heightened awareness of the issue within the Libraries. An LFC standing committee is now exploring and offering leadership training opportunities on an ongoing basis. An organizational climate survey has been completed and its results shared among the library faculty to address the issue of communication. In addition, the Libraries' administration has launched a number of strategic initiatives that were open to faculty and staff for leadership and participation. A number of faculty librarians are now leading these initiatives based on their professional strengths and interests.

Originality/value

This article has value to academic librarians and library administrators as they consider improving leadership training and development opportunities in their libraries. As middle management positions in academic libraries diminish, consideration must be given to how academic librarians gain experience or are trained in order to be well‐prepared for future leadership positions. Additionally, library administration should be instrumental in providing such opportunities to their librarians to ensure professional growth.

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