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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Vivek Soni, Rashmi Anand, Prasanta Kumar Dey, Ambika Prasad Dash and Devinder Kumar Banwet

The purpose of this research paper is to assess efficacy of e-governance implementation, influenced under the Indian-EU (European Union – EU) strategic dialogue. For the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to assess efficacy of e-governance implementation, influenced under the Indian-EU (European Union – EU) strategic dialogue. For the same purpose, this study aims to analyse and measure penetration level of information and communication technology (ICT) applications across ten select gross domestic product-dependent sectors (gross domestic product – GDP) in Indian economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) approach of PROMETHEE, using its partial and complete versions in fuzzy environment, is applied. The approach assesses e-governance efficacy in various sectors, which is chosen based on their contribution to GDP, where criteria values are assigned by expert opinions, feedback is received and lessons are learnt from training and initiatives taken under the Digital India programme launched by the Government of India. These criteria related to IT policy implementation, cyber security breaches, IT infrastructure development initiatives in select sectors are identified. Later, sectors outranking results have been highlighted using both fuzzy set theory along with PROMETHEE (F-PROMETHEE) and its visual application.

Findings

On applying F-PROMETHEE, studies found that industrial, railways, health and finance and education sectors outrank in their high merit orders. Contrary, outranking shows that agriculture, defence and aerospace sectors should be more open and accessible to adopt ICT applications in order to promote e-governance processes and their implementation to make e-services available to common citizens. For better interpretation of results, graphical analysis for interactive aid is used to present the analyses.

Research limitations/implications

Research study was found useful in the assessment of ICT penetration level in to support Indo-EU relations, where PROMETHEE method is used to outrank sectors alternatives. Criteria are also weighted using fuzzy scale, and the impact of criteria on all alternatives has also been assessed. MCDM framework addresses that subjectivity lies in sectors to implement ICTs bases services. However, few other MCDM frameworks, methods such as COPRAS, GST, GRA, SAW and SWARA, can be used for the same purpose.

Practical implications

Sectors alternative involve high degree of complexity to adopt ICT applications for smooth e-governance and seek effective decision-making for investment prioritization and future development. This study also aims to address cyber security concerns of policymakers. Outranking methods of F-PROMETHEE are able to address the criteria-to-criteria impact and support decision-making in a more precise way.

Social implications

This study is inspired from the strategic implementation of the framework of the e-Government Action Plan 2016-2020 of the EU. The findings from the paper can provide referential support to the Indian Government and policymakers to support information delivery, implement cyber security policies and various sector developments.

Originality/value

This research study can act as a strong base in the decision-making process in conflicting situations of e-governance in India. This study not only can synergize conflicting ideas of various stakeholders, academicians in the Indian IT-sector but also can act as support to administrators and the policymakers to monitor the status of the India-EU Information Society Dialogue.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Manzoor Hassan Malik and Nirmala Velan

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of trends of Indian information technology and business processing management (IT-BPM) sector and to analyse the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of trends of Indian information technology and business processing management (IT-BPM) sector and to analyse the determinants of IT-BPM sector during the period 1991-2014.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on annual data collected from National Association of Software and Service Companies and Department of Electronic and Information Technology for the period 1991 to 2014. The methodology adopted for studying the objectives are simple averages, percentages, ratios, growth rates, graphs prepared on the basis of data from the IT-BPM sector and regression analysis. Trends and patterns in key variables, such as total revenue, domestic revenue, export revenue, employment and exports of the IT-BPM sector have been examined. Factors influencing IT-BPM export growth have been analysed using ordinary least square multiple regression model, with growth rates of gross domestic product (GDP), labour productivity, exchange rate and previous year’s export, as the explanatory variables.

Findings

The export revenue from IT-BPM sector increased continuously over the years, at an average growth rate of 36.60 per cent during the period 1991 to 2014. Similarly, domestic revenue of IT-BPM sector also increased, but at a lower growth rate. This is because domestic market in India is captured by multinational giants against Indian firms, which do not possess full comparative advantage in the case of IT-BPM sector. Indian firms are producing low skill activities required for production, mainly concentrated only in the export sector. Direct employment, excluding hardware from IT-BPM sector, has grown at an average rate of 18.08 per cent over the study period. The determinants of IT-BPM exports indicated previous year’s export demand to be significantly contributing the highest to export growth rate. This was followed by GDP growth rate, implying that overall growth of the economy leads to significant increase in export growth. Increased labour productivity followed next in significantly encouraging export growth.

Research limitations/implications

Generalization of the results may not be possible, as Indian conditions and policies vary.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for the expansion of domestic market, diversification of trade and products, innovations for increasing competitiveness and sustainability in the global market in the wake of stiff competitions from new competitors.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on originality in analysis of determinants of export growth.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Krishan Boora and Kavita Jangra

The purpose of this paper is to explore the preparation level of Indian public sector banks for the implementation of Basel III. It is mandatory for public sector banks in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the preparation level of Indian public sector banks for the implementation of Basel III. It is mandatory for public sector banks in India to make adequate preparations to comply with the Basel III international regulations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a modified questionnaire (Ernst & Young, 2013; AL-Tamimi et al., 2016) to examine the preparedness level of Indian public sector banks for implementing Basel III. Seven hypotheses are developed and tested.

Findings

The results show that Indian public sector banks are positively inclined toward Basel III, and the awareness level of Indian banks’ managers is adequate concerning Basel III. The banks have required resources for the proper implementation of Basel III, which is a prerequisite for its implementation. Banks know about the expected benefits that can be attained from implementing Basel III appropriately and banks are also aware of the high cost attached with Basel III. The capital adequacy ratio of public sector banks is above 11 percent, showing the banks’ readiness for Basel III.

Practical implications

The public sector banks need to concentrate on revising the existing policies to sharpen their risk management practices. Moreover, improving the level of education on Basel III is still required and the results also support the importance of advanced technology and trained human resources at all level as a basic requirement for the implementation of Basel III. It can be achieved by the support of government, Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and other concerned agencies. The enforcement of Basel III will also create various challenges for Indian public sector banks, in terms of declining profitability, increasing capital requirements and nonperforming assets. That is why the impact of Basel III norms on Indian public sector banks cannot be undervalued.

Originality/value

The findings would assist the Indian public sector banks to know about their preparedness level for Basel III and what are the necessary actions to encourage Basel III implementation process. The present study would be important for regulators and decision makers in banks, as the main purpose of this study is to increase their awareness of Basel III norms. The result would also help the regulators regarding the corrective measures that should be taken by RBI in order to motivate the banks for enforcing Basel III.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Jatin Goyal, Rajdeep Singh, Harpreet Kaur and Kanwaljeet Singh

The purpose of this study is to comprehend the efficiency levels of the Indian textile industry and also its sub-sectors in the light of changing global and national…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to comprehend the efficiency levels of the Indian textile industry and also its sub-sectors in the light of changing global and national business environment. It is imperative to study the efficiency levels of textile industry for an emerging economy like India, where the industry contributes up to 13 per cent in export earnings, 10 per cent in total industrial production and 2 per cent in gross domestic product (GDP). The study holds an important place in the wake of phasing out of the quota regime existing under the Multi Fibre Agreement (MFA) and the rising competition being faced from countries such as Bangladesh, Vietnam and Cambodia.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study attempts to have an in-depth analysis of the efficiency levels in the Indian textile industry using meta-frontier data envelopment analysis, which is a non-parametric linear programming based frontier technique.

Findings

The findings highlight that the Indian textile industry is inefficient and has a huge scope of improvement in terms of efficiency. It also confirms the existence of different production functions among the sub-sectors of the industry. Among the different sub-sectors, the proximity of production frontier of readymade garments is the closest to meta-frontier followed by cotton and blended yarn, man-made fibre, cloth and others.

Practical implications

The findings bear strong implications for the policymakers in their attempt to regain the lost competitive position of the Indian textile industry and to enhance its contribution in the economy. As per the findings, policymakers should target the relatively inefficient sub-sectors of textile industry (cloth, man-made fibre, cotton and blended yarn) to infuse more efficiency in these sectors to enhance the market share of the Indian textile industry in the global textiles market.

Originality/value

The current study is a unique addition to the sparse literature on managing efficiencies in the textile industry, particularly of emerging economy like India. Looking at the methodological and geographical coverage of the previous work, it was found that no study has explored and analysed the efficiencies of the sub-sectors in the Indian textile industry using meta-frontier analysis. Therefore, this study will be the first of its kind which seeks to fill such gaps and intends to enrich the available literature.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Jacqueline Birt, Mahesh Joshi and Michael Kend

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the value relevance of segment information for both public and private sector banks in India. In doing so, this paper examines…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the value relevance of segment information for both public and private sector banks in India. In doing so, this paper examines a rapidly developing economy and perhaps its most critical sector during this period of strong economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study uses the simplified Ohlson model, for a sample of 136 private sector and public sector banks for the period 2007-2010 in India.

Findings

The paper finds that public sector banks have higher share prices, higher earnings and more equity compared with private sector banks. Segment earnings data is highly value relevant for both sectors; however, segment equity data is only marginally value relevant for Indian banks. The number of segments is also value relevant and associated with higher share prices.

Originality/value

The results of this study contribute additional evidence to the literature on segment reporting by studying the effect of adoption of segment reporting in an emerging market. Findings from the paper are particularly relevant as India is currently in the process of changing its segment reporting requirements and moving to an IFRS-based segment standard.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Vivek Soni, Prasanta Kumar Dey, Rashmi Anand, Charru Malhotra and Devinder Kumar Banwet

The purpose of this research paper is to assess e-governance efficacy in various sectors of India. The paper develops on Grey System Theory (GST) methodology and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to assess e-governance efficacy in various sectors of India. The paper develops on Grey System Theory (GST) methodology and enlightens grey portions of e-governance in select sectors. Research study identifies few grey criteria which affect implementation of information and communication technology (ICT) applications to support sustainable e-governance. Such criteria are related to information security breaches, information technology (IT) policy implementation, investments and strategic advantages for the various sector developments.

Design/methodology/approach

Considering “information” as a sensitive element to security for administration and part of dark portion to Indian economy, GST-based COmplex PRroportional ASsessment (COPRAS-G) method is adopted to assess the e-governance efficacy. The method provides flexible multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) approach to assess e-governance in prioritizing the sector alternatives of future strategic development. Priority order of select sectors is estimated, and COPRAS-G method is used in the research study to support decision-making on e-governance. Study compares ten major gross domestic product-dependent sectors based on few grey criteria. These criteria are chosen based on authors’ perspective on this study and feedback received from government officials of district levels under the Digital India-training programme. To address the subjectivity that lies in e-governance grey areas of sector, criteria are also weighted using fuzzy scale. Later methodology-based results are presented to draw a strategic road map for strategic development of the country.

Findings

On applying COPRAS-G method to predict pessimistic, optimistic and realistic scenarios of e-governance implementation across the ten sectors, high priory order in realistic scenario of results shows that implementation of ICT applications for e-governance should be in the sectors such as environment, climate change and in the railways. Industrial sector is also ranked as the preferred one over the other sectors on the basis of e-governance efficacy assessment.

Research limitations/implications

Here COPRAS-G method is used as MCDM techniques. However, few other MCDM techniques such as GRA, DRSA, VIKOR, SMAA, SWARA and SAW can be also explored to outrank various Indian sectors to deal with subjectivity in decision-making.

Practical implications

Implementation of ICT applications to support e-governance varies from sector to sector. ICT-based governance involves high degree of complexity in driving the operations for development of respective sectors. Therefore, government and policymakers need more flexibility to overcome present barriers of sector development. Such research can support decision-making where GST-based COPRAS-G method is able to capture and address the breaches of information security. Moreover, management concern for sector development has been presented on the basis of pessimistic, optimistic and realistic scenarios more precisely.

Social implications

The results can provide guidance to the academicians, policymakers and public sectors highlighting various possible measures to handle the security breaches in multi-facet intention of sustainable development. The outcomes from MCDM framework can also help in drawing a rough trajectory of strategy, i.e. development of ICTs applications and e-governance process.

Originality/value

This paper can supplement and act as the support for decision-making in conflicting situations on different flexible scenarios. Moreover, such work can synergize conflicting ideas of decision makers, academics and various other stakeholders of the Indian IT sector.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Rishi Kant and Deepak Jaiswal

In the present competitive scenario in the Indian banking industry, service quality has become one of the most important facets of interest to academic researchers. The…

Abstract

Purpose

In the present competitive scenario in the Indian banking industry, service quality has become one of the most important facets of interest to academic researchers. The purpose of this paper is to determine the dimensions of perceived service quality and investigate their impact on customer satisfaction in the Indian banking context, with special reference to selected public sector banks in India.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of the empirical study, the authors validate a measurement model using structural equation modeling for investigating the impact of perceived service quality dimensions on customer satisfaction. The study sample consists of 480 respondents in the National Capital Region (NCR) of India; the data were collected through a structured questionnaire utilizing a seven-point Likert scale while implementing a purposive sampling technique.

Findings

The perceived service quality dimensions identified were tangibility, reliability, assurance, responsiveness, empathy, and image. The empirical findings revealed that “responsiveness” was found to be the most significant predictor of customer satisfaction. On the other hand, “image” (corporate image) has a positive but the least significant relationship with customer satisfaction followed by all other constructs. The exception is “reliability,” which is insignificantly related to customer satisfaction in Indian public sector banks.

Research limitations/implications

The study cannot be generalized in the context of Indian banking sectors, as it only focused on the public sector. The findings of this study suggest that the six dimensions of perceived service quality model are a suitable instrument for evaluating bank service quality for public banks in India. Therefore, bank managers can use this model to assess the bank service quality in the context of Indian public sector banks.

Originality/value

There is dearth of research focusing on corporate image as a dimension of perceived service quality and its effect on customer satisfaction in the Indian banking context. Furthermore, similar studies were rarely found in the Indian context, especially within the public banking sector. Hence, this paper attempts to accomplish the research gap by empirically testing the satisfaction level of a large sample of the population in NCR toward six dimensions of perceived service quality rendered by selected public sector banks in India.

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Pamela Meil and Hal Salzman

Is the rise of the Indian software industry simply another Asian state-dominated industrial growth story or is India distinctive, an economy where small technology…

Abstract

Purpose

Is the rise of the Indian software industry simply another Asian state-dominated industrial growth story or is India distinctive, an economy where small technology entrepreneurs also find niches for development and can be drivers of innovation? Research has focused on the large integrated Indian and international service providers. This study examines the opportunity for growth among smaller innovative technology entrepreneurial firms. Two areas of inquiry are: What factors have been responsible for spurring growth in the Indian IT industry? What type of work is being carried out at Indian firms and is this profile changing? This paper aims to examine the emergence of technology entrepreneurs, particularly in terms of their links to multinational firms and their role and position in global value chains. The paper takes a multi-level approach to understanding development trajectories in the IT sector in India: a global value chain approach to the extent that company processes are seen in their larger networked context across organizations and an institutional approach in terms of state policies that influence the creation of infrastructure that, in turn, shapes organizational development trajectories. Additionally, it examines the role of the various actors within IT sector organizations – the workers, the managers and, in the case of the small companies in our sample, the owners – on the outcome of growth trajectories in the Indian IT sector. We find that the various levels of change and policy all contribute to the outcome in company trajectories: the dominance of multinational enterprises on the market, the entrepreneurial vision and survival strategies of returned technology expatriates, and the changing policies of the government in promoting indigenous business.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research interviews; comparative case study; literature review; multi-tier analysis.

Findings

The technology entrepreneurial development in India appears to represent quite a distinctive path in terms of both firm development and broader economic development. It is focused on the IT sector, in which high skill “knowledge work” is carried out and which has been able to develop despite lack of basic infrastructure (roads and reliable electricity).

Research limitations/implications

After the opening up of the business environment to large Western multinational enterprises (MNEs), it was difficult for indigenous Indian entrepreneurs to compete in innovative product development markets. Developing such companies depended on individual risk taking, as no specific infrastructure existed for niche production. However, the knowledge base and innovation clusters did offer opportunities for obtaining contracts. The Indian entrepreneurs did have to make a lot of compromises about defining their business and the tasks they could undertake. More research is needed on the paths and development opportunities for these smaller Indian-owned firms.

Practical implications

Unique opportunities are emergent and defy easy policy prescriptions, other than precluding change that does not foreclose emergent possibilities (e.g. such as strong state controlled business development).

Social implications

Indian-owned innovative companies, although having difficulties competing with large Indian and Western MNEs, do put pressure on these MNEs to move work up the value chain, thereby providing more interesting and challenging opportunities for Indian knowledge workers.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique company-level perspective about entrepreneurialism in the Indian software sector from the perspective of different actors in the process. It then links this company-level perspective to a larger context both in terms of trajectories of development at the macro level, as well as the role that the company’s place in multinational value chains has in its development perspectives. It gives a special insight into the motivations and obstacles facing entrepreneurs in India’s dynamic software sector.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Rajneesh Narula and Tiju Prasad Kodiyat

This paper aims to discuss the opportunities and limitations that the location-specific advantages of the home country represent for infant multinational enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the opportunities and limitations that the location-specific advantages of the home country represent for infant multinational enterprises (MNEs). The systemic weaknesses of the home country can constrain the long-term competitiveness of its firms and, ultimately, the competitiveness of its MNEs. Many emerging countries have a constrained set of location-specific (L) assets from which their firms are able to develop ownership-specific assets.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine data for the case of India, an economy regarded as having considerable potential to expand to knowledge-intensive sectors, using a “systems of innovation” framework, merged with an analysis of L advantages.

Findings

At the macro level, India’s performance is not different from countries of similar economic structure, and its current pockets of excellence are a reflection of its L assets. The analysis suggests that the failure to foster and upgrade the L assets of emerging economies is likely to stunt the growth of their domestic firms and, ultimately, any new MNE activity in the long-term.

Research limitations/implications

In the case of India, systemic policy changes are needed to upgrade the knowledge infrastructure and institutions to support a shift in the competitive advantages to new sectors outside existing pockets of excellence. Indian firms are unlikely to be able to rely on the knowledge infrastructure of their home economy and will “exit” the Indian milieu because of weaknesses in L assets, as much as to seek markets and customers elsewhere. There will be few opportunities for new generations of firms to venture abroad from a position of strength, rather than as a means to overcome their home country disadvantages.

Originality/value

The evidence would suggest that – like other emerging economies – Indian firms are unlikely to be able to rely on the knowledge infrastructure of their home economy and are “exiting” the Indian milieu because of its weaknesses in L assets, as much as to seek markets and customers elsewhere. Most importantly, India faces a potential shortage of skilled human capital in the medium term.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Chhavi Sodhi and Pushpendra Singh

The purpose of this paper is to present a historical overview of the health service sector in India. The development in the healthcare sector from the late eighteenth…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a historical overview of the health service sector in India. The development in the healthcare sector from the late eighteenth century into current times is examined from the prism of the role played by British and US healthcare systems in influencing change in the Indian setup.

Design/methodology/approach

Online databases searched were PubMed and JSTOR, using the search terms, “Indian health service system in transition”, “British influence on the Indian healthcare setup” and “American neo-liberal influence on Indian healthcare sector”. The authors then examined titles and abstracts of selected articles for short-listing relevant articles. Reference lists of selected articles were examined for further locating related studies. While this constituted the secondary literature for the current paper, reports by governmental and non-governmental organisation reports on the Indian health service system too were utilised as primary data sources.

Findings

Influenced by the British and later by the American healthcare system, the Indian healthcare network has undergone numerous changes. In the present era, the Indian healthcare system is increasingly veering towards the American model of healthcare delivery. Health is increasingly being conceived of as a commodity to be traded in the market, with the state’s role curtailed towards provisioning for and facilitating access of the weakest sections of the society through a means-tested insurance system. This has happened without adequate checks and balances on the private sector to ensure that the needs of the people accessing the system are adequately met.

Social implications

By tracing the development of the health service sector in India and the motives that guide such change, the paper depicts how the thrust of the system has altered from one providing universal healthcare services to the people, irrespective of their ability to pay, at the time of independence to commercialisation in present times. With the marketisation of healthcare, the focus has shifted from serving people to profiting from the provisioning of healthcare.

Originality/value

The paper throws light on the underlying inadequacies of the Indian healthcare setup and the need for more active participation by the government in this sector in the future if it aims to make healthcare more equitably accessible to its vast population.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

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