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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Mustangimah Mustangimah, Prakoso Bhairawa Putera, Muhammad Zulhamdani, Setiowiji Handoyo and Sri Rahayu

The purpose of this study is to outline the improvement of framing in Indonesia science and technology policy content, policy formulation model, policy strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to outline the improvement of framing in Indonesia science and technology policy content, policy formulation model, policy strategy implementation and policy performance indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is conducted by implementing action research model to generate new knowledge as a research interest, through the search for solutions or improvements to problematical situation, applying Soft Systems Methodology. Thus, this research model is regarded as Soft Systems Methodology-based Action Research (SSM-based AR).

Findings

Policy formulation is not evidence based in which policy documents remain theoretical and are impractical or not detailed in engaging real conditions and strategic issues, yet the targets are measurable despite predictive results. Change and strengthening are required in the national science and technology policy for the next period, on the basis that future research policies are encouraged to address problems and solutions to build a country based on science and technology. Indonesia requires policies involving both effective and efficient national research; therefore, the need for an integrated policy direction conveying science and technology and other related sectors, such as the health sector and food, remains vital.

Originality/value

Previously, science and technology policy planning in Indonesia was not equipped with data and indicators of success, having no target to achieve within a five-year period. In the coming periods, science and technology policy documents in Indonesia are issued in the form of government regulations/presidential decrees, including indicators of science and technology achievements (quantitatively) for five years.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2019

Thomas N. Garavan, Sinead Heneghan, Fergal O’Brien, Claire Gubbins, Yanqing Lai, Ronan Carbery, James Duggan, Ronnie Lannon, Maura Sheehan and Kirsteen Grant

This monograph reports on the strategic and operational roles of learning and development (L&D) professionals in Irish, UK European and US organisations including…

Abstract

Purpose

This monograph reports on the strategic and operational roles of learning and development (L&D) professionals in Irish, UK European and US organisations including multinational corporations, small to medium enterprises, the public sector and not for profit organisations. This paper aims to investigate the contextual factors influencing L&D roles in organisations, the strategic and operational roles that L&D professionals play in organisations, the competencies and career trajectories of L&D professionals, the perceptions of multiple internal stakeholders of the effectiveness of L&D roles and the relationships between context, L&D roles, competencies/expertise and perceived organisational effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study findings are based on the use of multiple methods. The authors gathered data from executives, senior managers, line managers, employee and L&D professionals using multiple methods: a survey (n = 440), Delphi study (n = 125) and semi-structured interviews (n = 30).

Findings

The analysis revealed that L&D professionals increasingly respond to a multiplicity of external and internal contextual influences and internal stakeholders perceived the effectiveness of L&D professionals differently with significant gaps in perceptions of what L&D contributes to organisational effectiveness. L&D professionals perform both strategic and operational roles in organisations and they progress through four career levels. Each L&D role and career level requires a distinct and unique set of foundational competencies and L&D expertise. The authors found that different contextual predictors were important in explaining the perceived effectiveness of L&D roles and the importance attached to different foundational competencies and areas of L&D expertise.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to have investigated the L&D professional role in organisations from the perspective of multiple stakeholders using multiple research methods.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Daniel Chan

Distils the key insights for management development from the four research papers, in this special issue taken individually as well as collectively. The perspective taken…

Abstract

Distils the key insights for management development from the four research papers, in this special issue taken individually as well as collectively. The perspective taken is one of strategy – for the industry practitioner or strategy/management consultant. The key insights that extend beyond the scope of individual research papers will be presented first, under the following themes: Lessons of brand/differentiation strategy; Managing a leading brand; A lesson from the case study; Strategy in a complex, turbulent and uncertain globalising environment. Key insights that are single research paper specific will be presented as follows: The story of Singapore Airlines and the Singapore Girl; Air wars in Asia: competitive and collaborative strategies and tactics in action; The Development of the airline industry from 1978 to 1998: a strategic global overview; Beyond Singapore Girl: grand and product/service differentiation strategies in the new millennium.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2018

Pasi Aaltola

This paper aims to explore management control in the strategic development of business model and managerial innovations. The issue is approached from the perspective of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore management control in the strategic development of business model and managerial innovations. The issue is approached from the perspective of managerial work, aiming to outline what managers consider as essential elements of management control in these often iterative and learning-intensive developmental activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the views of 20 managers engaged in strategic development and its control in various organisations. The interview data consist of the respondents’ experiences and project cases involving non-technological innovations. Qualitative content analysis is used to identify three key concepts of management control of business model and managerial innovations.

Findings

The findings suggest that with managerial and business model innovation, appropriate management control could be established by aligning the innovation being developed with the strategic story of the organisation, leveraging co-creational projects and experimentation with close customer contact.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of this qualitative research is on building an initial framework. Future research could expand understanding of managerial work and accounting by examining this study’s outcomes in more practical detail in various contexts.

Practical implications

The findings of this study lead managers and researchers to consider management control of non-technological innovations as an enabling system supporting successful innovations.

Originality/value

This study adds a unique perspective to the literature by conceptualising and offering managerial implications for management control in the context of strategic development of non-technological innovations.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Ellen F. Goldman, Andrea R. Scott and Joseph M. Follman

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the practices used by organizations to develop the strategic thinking ability of their leaders, managers, and other employees.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the practices used by organizations to develop the strategic thinking ability of their leaders, managers, and other employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A basic interpretive study was conducted with human resource (HR) executives across a broad range of large organizations. Participants were interviewed, and general information about their organization and its programs was reviewed. Findings were verified via member checks and triangulation.

Findings

Organizations make limited use of the range of approaches to develop strategic thinking, many indirectly supporting its development via general leadership programs. Most approaches are experiential and focused on elites. Use of the literature, evaluation, and ties to competency models are very limited.

Research limitations/implications

The study only provides indications of potential generalizations, but offers access to issues that cannot be identified without an in-depth analysis.

Practical implications

The findings identify major gaps in the practices utilized to develop strategic thinking and the related competency framing and evaluation processes. As such, the study exposes opportunities to extend what is known about effective leadership development programs specifically to the development of strategic thinking.

Originality/value

The study fills a gap in the literature regarding specific ways organizations formally and informally develop the strategic thinking of their leaders, managers, and other employees. In so doing, it provides a catalyst for strategy and HR executives and scholars to come together to improve the development of this often absent ability.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2015

Jennine Knight

The dynamic environment in which the academic library operates requires explicit links between business strategy and a new management priority including the development of…

Abstract

The dynamic environment in which the academic library operates requires explicit links between business strategy and a new management priority including the development of people; this is the focus of human resource development (HRD). It serves the needs of an organization by ensuring that employees’ expertise is state-of-the-art, something that is critical in a period of rapid technological development coinciding with ever-expanding societal needs. HRD can be relied upon to support and shape a wide range of academic library initiatives requiring a competent and engaged workforce by recognizing people as the organization’s most critical asset, one that drives competitive advantage and helps it out-perform the market. Emphasis is placed on developing an organizational context that will attract and develop talented individuals and leaders and keep them engaged. Furthermore, HRD activities must respond to job changes and integrate staff skills sets with the long-term plans and strategies of the organization thus ensuring the efficient and effective use of resources. This chapter explores HRD as a strategic concern of the organization and how it can best serve the organization in the long term. In so doing, it considers how HRD can help the academic library focus resources in those areas where there are strong likelihoods that they can produce substantial improvements in future capacity and performance. This kind of strategic planning helps the organization configure resources within a dynamic competitive environment, thus serving market needs and satisfying stakeholder expectations, helping meet its business purpose and maintain its strategic direction. The case study developed here highlights the need for the effective linkage of HRD and strategic planning for the advancement of the academic library. It suggests the need for developing and implementing both a strategic plan and an HRD plan and developing a culture of strategic human resource development (SHRD) in academic libraries.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-910-3

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Mikhail Kozlov

The purpose of the paper was to help resolve the problem if only the universities possessing strategic entrepreneurship manage to advance significantly in their global…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper was to help resolve the problem if only the universities possessing strategic entrepreneurship manage to advance significantly in their global ranking positions, while most of their competitors fail.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual part of the study introduces a new strategic entrepreneurial latecomer university framework, based on the combination of the resource-based view, dynamic capabilities, strategic innovation, strategic entrepreneurship and latecomer organization concepts. For verification of the proposed conceptual framework, case study of the Lausanne Federal Polytechnic Institute is considered by structuring the materials of its well-documented success story of its advancing in global rankings in terms of the construct dimensions.

Findings

The case study findings were identification of entrepreneurial mindset, managing human resources strategically and strategic innovativeness. It confirms conceptual findings that the presence of strategic entrepreneurship construct dimensions in latecomer university is instrumental in sensing business opportunities at most lucrative market segments of scientific research, carrying out its strategic innovation responsible for university difference in strategic transformational development and exploiting the opportunities ahead of its competitors so as to become more competitive and overtake them.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of this study are that only one case of university transition to catch-up development is explored and not all strategic entrepreneurship construct distinctive dimensions are considered. The research will be further elaborated to incorporate all strategic entrepreneurship construct dimensions.

Practical implications

The approach introduced here has shown that to advance in global rankings, university should carry out its strategic innovation ahead of its competitors.

Originality/value

The study is supposed to be the first where university at the stage of its transition to catch-up development is considered using new framework based on strategic entrepreneurship construct dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

Abstract

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

Details

Management Decision, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Praveen Kulkarni, Rohit Mutkekar and Sanjeev Ingalagi

Start-ups are the new avenues for innovation and employment. Strategic management is critical for employee engagement and skill development of start-ups. This study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Start-ups are the new avenues for innovation and employment. Strategic management is critical for employee engagement and skill development of start-ups. This study aims to understand the impact of strategic management on employee engagement and skill development.

Design/methodology/approach

The study attempts to identify principal factors of strategic management influencing employee engagement and skill development. Structural equation modeling has been used to understand effects of the study.

Findings

The study results have shown the challenges concerning employee skill development and reflected on importance of the employee engagement programmes for the growth of the human resource in the start-ups.

Research limitations/implications

The study has confined to strategic management for employee engagement and skill development. However, studies related to challenges encountered by start-ups in the specific areas of marketing, operations and finance, etc. would provide more detailed impact on the growth of start-ups.

Practical implications

This study provides an insight into strategic management for employee engagement and skill development. The results would provide directions for improving strategy management from the perspective of employee engagement and skill development.

Social implications

The study on start-ups provides a direction to the owners of start-ups to understand the importance of strategic management and human resource management for building strong enterprising which can provide employment opportunity for the youth of the nation and improve the society at large.

Originality/value

This paper is an attempt to provide directions for managing challenges from the perspective of employees’ engagement and skill development, which is essential for growth and sustainability in the future.

Details

Vilakshan - XIMB Journal of Management, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0973-1954

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Ellen Goldman and Andrea Richards Scott

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the competency models used by organizations to assess the strategic thinking ability of their leaders, managers, and other…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the competency models used by organizations to assess the strategic thinking ability of their leaders, managers, and other employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A basic interpretive study was conducted with human resource executives across a broad range of large organizations. Participants were interviewed, and competency models in use were shared, reviewed, and discussed. The model development process was also explored in depth. Findings were verified via member checks and triangulation.

Findings

Models in use either identify strategic thinking as a stand-alone competency, or embed it under three different areas. Most cover one or more executive levels, stating varying expectations for strategic thinking by job title or level, or differentiating strategic thinking performance levels. The models include descriptions of strategic thinking behaviors that cross seven categories of strategy development, implementation, and organizational alignment.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides indications of potential generalizations that should be considered with more organizations across sectors.

Practical implications

The findings provide practitioners with format and content examples to enhance the assessment of strategic thinking in existing competency models, as well as process considerations for model development/revision. The findings also identify how competency model components are used across the spectrum of talent management activities.

Originality/value

The study fills a gap in the literature by providing empirically based identification of the strategic thinking behaviors organizations consider essential competencies and how they are assessed. In so doing, the study provides a glimpse of how strategic thinking is used in practice and across a range of strategic management activities. In addition, the study links strategic thinking to the competency development literature, illustrating details of competency model development for strategic thinking, and identifying opportunities for related theory development in both domains.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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