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J. Dalton Stevens

To understand how young men with disabilities react against overarching narratives of independence during the transition to adulthood in independent living and…

Abstract

Purpose

To understand how young men with disabilities react against overarching narratives of independence during the transition to adulthood in independent living and interdependent living arrangements with parents in order to address the gap between transition policy and real lived experience.

Methods/Approach

I use life history interviews and ethnographic “go-alongs” with nine men with mobility impairments to understand how they experience and make sense of independent living and interdependence during the transition to adulthood. Transcripts and field notes were analyzed using grounded theory methodology.

Findings

Data reveal diverging pathways participants took to interdependent living situation, rooting before transition, and returning during transition. These pathways are shaped by logics of residential decision-making: accessibility expectations and individual adaptability. Those who rooted before transition developed accessibility expectations that motivated them to remain living their parents’ homes while those who returned during transition relied on individual adaptability to overcome physical inaccessibility. Individual adaptability did not overcome inaccessibility – all returned to their parents’ homes. Pathways shape how each group of participants experienced and made sense of interdependent living arrangements and independent living. Those who rooted before transition found interdependence to be a route to increased independence, and did not consider independent living a marker of adulthood. Those who returned during transition found that the interdependence they experienced increased feelings of dependence.

Implications/Value

Experiences and meanings emerging adults with disabilities have during the transition to adulthood reveal the complexity of interdependence and independent living. The pathways and the social forces shaping those pathways to interdependent living arrangements have implications for life course theory and disability policy.

Details

New Narratives of Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-144-5

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Article

Melanie Henwood and Bob Hudson

At a time when there is much debate about the nature of self‐directed support and the development of individual budgets, the role of the Independent Living Funds comes…

Abstract

At a time when there is much debate about the nature of self‐directed support and the development of individual budgets, the role of the Independent Living Funds comes into question. This article reports on the findings of an independent review of the ILF undertaken for the Department for Work and Pensions. It is argued that, while in many ways ahead of its time at its creation in 1988, the ILF is no longer at the leading edge of policy and practice in supporting independent living such as have been promoted under the auspices of In Control.There is much that can be done to improve the operation of the ILF and the experience which people have of using it, and the report made multiple recommendations for change. However, in the longer term the case is made that the ILF should not have an ongoing and separate existence, and there is a presumption of full incorporation within individualised budgets.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Kate Karban, Caroline Paley and Kim Willcock

The purpose of this paper is to present results from an evaluation of the experience of a move to independent living for people with mental health needs or a learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present results from an evaluation of the experience of a move to independent living for people with mental health needs or a learning disability. The discussion focuses on the shift in organisational culture from providing care within a hostel setting to supporting people in their own tenancies.

Design/methodology/approach

The evaluation was underpinned by a participatory action research design. A total of ten co‐researchers with experience of using services or as carers were recruited. Qualitative data was obtained from “before” and “after” interviews with residents, staff and relatives.

Findings

Widespread satisfaction was expressed with people's new homes. Many residents were found to be increasingly independent. There was some evidence of concerns regarding the pace and process of change and the introduction of new practices to promote independence.

Research limitations/implications

The timing of the evaluation limited the opportunity for comprehensive “before” and “after” data collection. The involvement of co‐researchers required considerable time and support although the experience of those involved was positive.

Practical implications

Learning from this evaluation emphasises the importance of support and preparation for staff as well as residents, in moving from hostel to independent living.

Social implications

This study highlights the advantages of a participatory design in evaluating a major change in service delivery.

Originality/value

This paper raises important issues about organisational change. It contributes to wider debates regarding the implementation of personalisation and recovery‐focused agendas.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article

Xin Hu

The majority of older Australians prefer living in their own home. Home modifications support older adults' ageing-in-place through mitigating environmental hazards of…

Abstract

Purpose

The majority of older Australians prefer living in their own home. Home modifications support older adults' ageing-in-place through mitigating environmental hazards of their home, and there is an increased interest in modifying older adults' residential environment in sustainable ways. However, an in-depth understanding of sustainability perceptions of home modification service providers (HMSPs) is lacking in Australia. Thus, the study aims to address this research gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative content analysis was adopted to identify sustainability perceptions through analyzing the retrieved home modification business information from the selected HMSPs' official websites. The results of qualitative content analysis were further analyzed by using independent-samples t-test and chi-square contingency table analysis to investigate the relationships between HMSP type and sustainability.

Findings

In total, 54 sustainability perceptions were identified, with the crucial ones being safe living environment, independent living and service diversity. Overall, there are no significant differences in sustainability perceptions between charitable and non-charitable HMSPs. Nevertheless, charitable HMSPs place more importance on social sustainability in comparison with non-charitable HMSPs.

Originality/value

The study results facilitate understanding about HMSPs' sustainability perceptions and sustainable home modifications in the ageing society, which facilities theory advancement and industry practice in the home modification area.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

Bishnu Sharma, Michael Harker, Debra Harker and Karin Reinhard

This aim of this study is to investigate whether food choice varies by the place of residence (dependent or independent) of a group of young adults.

Abstract

Purpose

This aim of this study is to investigate whether food choice varies by the place of residence (dependent or independent) of a group of young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐administered questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data from 305 German students between the ages of 18 to 24 years.

Findings

It was found that students who lived in the family home consumed more helpings of both fruit and vegetables each day, compared with young adults who lived independently. Further, higher proportions of dependent students ate more servings of every food group each day compared with their independent counterparts. It was also found that there is a significant difference in mood, weight concern and attitudes towards healthy eating between students under 21‐years‐old and those above 21‐years‐old.

Research limitations/implications

The research was a cross‐sectional study of a selected group of German university students from a single campus that was based on a quota sample and assessed self‐reported behaviour on a self‐administered questionnaire. While the limitations associated with these aspects of research design affect the generalizability of the findings, they, nonetheless, do not detract from the strengths and novelty of the research.

Practical implications

In terms of education, campaigns may consider focusing on improving the attitude toward healthy eating among young German adults who live in a dependent arrangement within the family home, perhaps encouraging the young adult to be an influencer in food purchases. Furthermore, it is suggested that social marketing campaigns that educate young adults about food‐related activities, such as budgeting, preparation and cooking, in readiness for, or in the early stages of, their transition to independent living would yield positive results. The motivation component of social marketing may also be informed by the research findings. Specifically, persuasive messages that correspond with Sheth and Frazier's inducement process may encourage healthier eating.

Originality/value

Being a relatively unexplored area, the findings are novel and provide valuable insights for the implementation of an inducement process for planned social change as well as informing the education and motivation elements of intervention strategies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part

Emily C. Bouck and Jiyoon Park

Transition is important to all students but especially important to students with intellectual disability who may need additional supports throughout their vertical…

Abstract

Transition is important to all students but especially important to students with intellectual disability who may need additional supports throughout their vertical transitions in education. This chapter discusses different vertical transitions students with intellectual disability face in education, with particular attention to the movement from high school to adult life. Throughout the chapter, research regarding current transition practices and outcomes for students with intellectual disability is discussed as well as evidence-based practices to support students with intellectual disability as they transition to post-school.

Details

Special Education Transition Services for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-977-4

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Article

Charles Lowe

This paper is an argument for a more holistic approach to independent living. Telecare and telehealth, as these services are being delivered in practice, risk increasing…

Abstract

This paper is an argument for a more holistic approach to independent living. Telecare and telehealth, as these services are being delivered in practice, risk increasing the isolation of vulnerable people. Though undesirable in its own right, this isolation often leads to depression, which in turn typically increases the costs of medical treatment substantially. The resultant lack of mental stimulation also creates the conditions for earlier onset of dementia. Finally, loss of identity exacerbates both depression and lack of stimulation. To overcome these problems, the technology should also be used to encourage users of telecare and telehealth to maintain and grow their engagement with wider society and to promote ‐ rather than restrict ‐ their mobility.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article

Camilla Parker

In March this year the European Coalition for Community Living published Wasted Time, Wasted Money, Wasted Lives… A Wasted Opportunity? This reported on how the current…

Abstract

In March this year the European Coalition for Community Living published Wasted Time, Wasted Money, Wasted Lives… A Wasted Opportunity? This reported on how the current use of European Union Structural Funds perpetuates the social exclusion of disabled people in central and eastern Europe by failing to support the transition from institutional care to community‐based alternatives. This paper summarises its key findings and recommendations.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article

Marco Bertelli, Luis Salvador‐Carulla, Stefano Lassi, Michele Zappella, Raymond Ceccotto, David Palterer, Johan de Groef, Laura Benni and Paolo Rossi Prodi

Recent international experiences of community inclusion have produced a major change in residential care for people with intellectual disability (ID). Assignment and…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent international experiences of community inclusion have produced a major change in residential care for people with intellectual disability (ID). Assignment and outcome assessment through new person‐centred measures are raising increasing interest; however, the information on quality of life and accommodation is still limited. This paper aims to provide an overview of the application of quality of life models and the size of the provision of different living arrangements.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic mapping of the literature of the last decade was followed by an expert guided review of the available evidence.

Findings

QoL outcomes measures of living arrangements in people with ID show conceptual and methodological challenges. The following key topics were identified: individual level: issues related to health status, behavioural problems and other personal factors (ageing, choice and empowerment); family and peers; local level: accommodation, architecture and urbanization, and economic aspects (deprivation and costs); macro level: social participation (community inclusion). The residential solutions that are currently considered of highest efficiency are small apartments in the community and “cluster centers”.

Originality/value

The level of quality of life is very relevant in the assessment of living arrangements in people with ID although its assessment still shows significant limitations. Some accommodation typologies seem more effective than others. New conceptual models of inclusive residential care support the convenience of a wide range of accommodation alternatives that may fit the individual needs of a highly heterogeneous population group. A unique residential alternative, albeit optimal from a community care perspective, may not be adequate for all persons with ID.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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