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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Sharon Torstonson, Denise Blake, Darrin Hodgetts and David M. Johnston

The purpose of this research is to highlight the role of not-for-profit (NFP) organisations in enhancing disaster preparedness. The authors set out to understand their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to highlight the role of not-for-profit (NFP) organisations in enhancing disaster preparedness. The authors set out to understand their perspectives and practices in regard to disaster preparedness activities to support people who live precarious lives, especially those who live as single parents who are the least prepared for disasters.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 12 staff members, either in a group setting or individually, from seven NFP organisations, who were located in Ōtautahi (Christchurch) and Kaiapoi in Aotearoa New Zealand. These participants were interviewed eight years after the 2011 Christchurch earthquake.

Findings

Four key narrative tropes or elements were drawn from across the interviews and were used to structure the research results. These included: “essential” support services for people living precarious lives; assisting people to be prepared; potential to support preparedness with the right materials and relationships; resourcing to supply emergency goods.

Originality/value

This research contributes to disaster risk reduction practices by advocating for ongoing resourcing of NFP groups due to their ability to build a sense of community and trust while working with precarious communities, such as single parents.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Barbara B. Stern, Stephen J. Gould and Benny Barak

This article examines single baby boom consumers on demographic and psychographic dimensions tested in a survey of 267 respondents. We found differences between singles

Abstract

This article examines single baby boom consumers on demographic and psychographic dimensions tested in a survey of 267 respondents. We found differences between singles and marrieds in social self‐image, age identification, nature and frequency of leisure activities, and shopping habits. Singles are characterized as “Social Seekers” because they socialize more and show more concern with their social image than marrieds. Marketing implications exist for a variety of products related to gender and marital status.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2008

Gueorgui Kambourov, Iourii Manovskii and Irina A. Telyukova

We study trends in occupational and geographic mobility of single and married men and women in the United States over the last 40 years. We find that while occupational…

Abstract

We study trends in occupational and geographic mobility of single and married men and women in the United States over the last 40 years. We find that while occupational mobility has increased for almost all subgroups of males, most of the increase was accounted for by a sharp increase in the mobility of singles. Similarly, the rates of geographic mobility were virtually identical for single and married workers in the early 1970s, but diverged since then – the increase in the geographic mobility of single men was more pronounced than the increase for married men. We discuss several theories of worker mobility in light of these trends and suggest that the increased labor force attachment of women might have played a prominent role in driving these changes.

Details

Frontiers of Family Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-542-0

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2021

Kate Hutchings

The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic literature review of research on non-traditional expatriates (NTEs) and an agenda for future research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic literature review of research on non-traditional expatriates (NTEs) and an agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The systematic literature review of NTEs 2010–2020 followed Moher et al.'s flow chart approach to undertaking a systematic literature review and included research on various categories of NTEs.

Findings

The article explains how the author developed an interest in NTEs and provides a brief distillation of the author's research on NTEs and its key contributions. The article then presents the findings of the systematic literature review of NTEs and highlights the key aspects and contributions of this research. The article examines the strengths and weaknesses of the body of research, how it relates to global mobility research broadly and presents some issues for future literature reviews.

Research limitations/implications

The article highlights the limited research undertaken on some types of NTEs and issues of construct definition. The article presents issues for future research on NTEs including examining a wider range of NTEs, the impact of changing locations for NTEs, identity and intersectionality of NTEs, and methodological issues within NTE research. Moreover, the call for future research suggests the need for greater construct clarity including proposing a new term to define this group, namely, minority expatriates.

Originality/value

The article is original in terms of building on earlier examinations of NTEs to provide a systematic literature review of NTEs 2010–2020 and an extensive agenda for further research in the field.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

John J. Burnett

While bank management has become aware of theneed to identify and assess potential marketsegments carefully, single persons remain asegment overlooked. This study…

Abstract

While bank management has become aware of the need to identify and assess potential market segments carefully, single persons remain a segment overlooked. This study addresses the need to view singles as heterogeneous in composition and behaviour. Three categories of singles (divorced, widowed, never married) and a sample of married individuals were compared in respect to a number of bank‐related variables. The findings support the need to distinguish between the types of singleness. Theoretical and pragmatic implications are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Bruce Bradbury

Conventional consumer equivalence scales measure the cost of children (and other household living arrangements) but not their benefits. Since many people choose to have…

Abstract

Conventional consumer equivalence scales measure the cost of children (and other household living arrangements) but not their benefits. Since many people choose to have children, these costs must be outweighed by other benefits. This paper considers these issues of demographic choice and explores the relevance of consumer equivalence scales to the broader welfare questions associated with tax/transfer policies and poverty and inequality measurement. The paper concludes that in contrast to conventional methods of measuring poverty and inequality, there is a case for the use of different equivalence scales for adults and children in the same household. Though the adults may have chosen their lower living standard in exchange for the “joys of parenthood”, the children have made no such choice.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Sally Herne

Since the beginning of the 1990s, nutrition education and healthpromotion have increasingly focused on the influence of diet on thequality of life in old age. The…

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Abstract

Since the beginning of the 1990s, nutrition education and health promotion have increasingly focused on the influence of diet on the quality of life in old age. The Government′s Health of the Nation policy in 1991 and the COMA report on The Nutrition of Elderly People in 1992 both emphasized the need for older age groups to adopt the dietary changes recommended for the population as a whole. In order to promote healthier eating habits and consequently improve health status, it is first vital to understand what makes elderly people follow particular dietary patterns and, equally, which factors constrain their choice. Reviews the current state of research on the social, economic, psychological, physiological, educational and personal factors which mediate food choice in later life. Indications are that it is the structural influences on choice which have the greatest impact – education, income, class and access to good health care. As a result, action at national level in the form of health and social policy designed to take into account the needs of older generations is highlighted.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Judith Langer

In their continuing quest for new product ideas, marketers are directed to the U.S. Census figures where they can identify shifting populations and newly emerging…

Abstract

In their continuing quest for new product ideas, marketers are directed to the U.S. Census figures where they can identify shifting populations and newly emerging demographic entities. Rather than relying on old stereotypes for direction, marketers must study the changed values, attitudes, lifestyles and self‐image of these groups. Using qualitative research techniques, the author says will result in implications for new product development, production, sales and marketing. The author identifies three groups whose lifestyles she has studied and who fit the parameters described above: Working women, singles and the 50‐plus age group. Opportunities for marketers are suggested as she describes their changed lifestyles which create a need for new products and services.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Xavier Ramos

Aims to provide new evidence about gender differentials in domestic work time, market work time and total work time, that updates the evidence provided by Jenkins and…

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to provide new evidence about gender differentials in domestic work time, market work time and total work time, that updates the evidence provided by Jenkins and O'Leary in 1997 and Layte in 1999 using UK time‐budget surveys.

Design/methodology/approach

Investigates gender differentials in work times using the British Household Panel survey (BHPS). The BHPS is a nationally representative longitudinal data set consisting of some 5,500 households (and 10,000 individuals) first interviewed in the autumn of 1991 and followed and re‐interviewed every year subsequently.

Findings

The picture that emerges from the BHPS data is a rather “traditional” and well‐known one. On average, women (be them married or single) work more at home and less in the labour market than men. The comforting side of this pessimistic conclusion, is that the trends in domestic and paid work time over the 1990s show a narrowing in the gender differentials, thanks mainly to the changing behaviour of women and not of men.

Originality/value

An important message that seems to emerge is that women are far more flexible than men. That is, men hardly react or change their behaviour in front of (certain) situations that clearly affect women's time allocation decisions (e.g. presence of children, cohort effects). Finally, the paper identifies and characterises the men who do better at home in relative terms: the “new” men.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2019

Songshan (Sam) Huang and Xiang Wei

This study aims to examine the demographic differences of Chinese nationals’ travel experience sharing through different offline and online platforms.

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397

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the demographic differences of Chinese nationals’ travel experience sharing through different offline and online platforms.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-tabulation analysis was applied on a national sample of 6081 respondents in China.

Findings

The study found that Chinese women tend to share travel experience more often than Chinese men; old people in China tend to use the face-to-face approach more than online or social media to share their travel experience. About 66.5 per cent of the survey sample used WeChat Moments to share their travel experience, highlighting WeChat as the dominating social media platform in China for travel sharing. In general, people who share via online platforms (WeChat, Weibo, QQ Space) tend to be young, single or unmarried, well-educated and earning a high monthly income.

Originality/value

The study offers an in-depth understanding of travel experience sharing idiosyncrasies in China.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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