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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

Ebru Yazgan

Contemporary management and strategy mean optimization of ingredient factors such as human factors, systems, operations and equipment. With system approach in management…

Abstract

Purpose

Contemporary management and strategy mean optimization of ingredient factors such as human factors, systems, operations and equipment. With system approach in management and strategy, human risk factor as input has considerable potential to change results as airworthiness in aviation management. The managers of aviation business also optimize their functions to act safe while making contribution to development in triple of sustainability as economic development and its sustainability; social development and its sustainability; and environmental development and its sustainability. Corporate sustainability can be accomplished via supporting workforce which is the human risk factor. To support (empowerment) workforce, researchers should identify human risk or error factors which are important to this research. The purpose of this study is to suggest holistic framework for working environment system of aircraft maintenance technicians (AMTs) within two respects such as human performance (ergonomics) and corporate performance (sustainability). The secondary purpose of this system is to develop human risk taxonomy by determining the factors affecting both human and work by taking ergonomic aspects in aviation.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a taxonomy of human risk factors for AMTs is developed. These human factors divided into groups and subfactors are obtained from an extensive literature review and experts’ opinions in the field of human performance in aviation. Taxonomy developed will be useful to both sharing and using corporate sources in sustainable way.

Findings

Human risk factors can be considered or accepted as factors that cause human error. This may result in the optimum way to managing human risk factor via minimizing human-based error. Personality, hazardous attitudes, individual characteristics, physical/psychological condition of AMTs and corporate social responsibility factors are human-related risk variables in this study. The risks and error can be reduced by recognizing these factors and revealing their relation to ergonomic design.

Originality/value

The results of this study are intended to constitute a guide for managers to manage risk factors and to take corrective and preventive actions for their maintenance operations. It is believed that this study is highly important for the aviation sector in terms of raising awareness or providing awareness for similar practices. As taxonomy of the risk factors contributes to the managing human error, corrective actions related to these factors must be taken by managers.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 90 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Mark Glenn Evans, Ying He, Iryna Yevseyeva and Helge Janicke

This paper aims to provide an understanding of the proportions of incidents that relate to human error. The information security field experiences a continuous stream of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an understanding of the proportions of incidents that relate to human error. The information security field experiences a continuous stream of information security incidents and breaches, which are publicised by the media, public bodies and regulators. Despite the need for information security practices being recognised and in existence for some time, the underlying general information security affecting tasks and causes of these incidents and breaches are not consistently understood, particularly with regard to human error.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses recent published incidents and breaches to establish the proportions of human error and where possible subsequently uses the HEART (human error assessment and reduction technique) human reliability analysis technique, which is established within the safety field.

Findings

This analysis provides an understanding of the proportions of incidents and breaches that relate to human error, as well as the common types of tasks that result in these incidents and breaches through adoption of methods applied within the safety field.

Originality/value

This research provides original contribution to knowledge through the analysis of recent public sector information security incidents and breaches to understand the proportions that relate to human error.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

B. Kirwan, B. Martin, H. Rycraft and A. Smith

Human error data in the form of human error probabilities should ideally form the corner‐stone of human reliability theory and practice. In the history of human

Abstract

Human error data in the form of human error probabilities should ideally form the corner‐stone of human reliability theory and practice. In the history of human reliability assessment, however, the collection and generation of valid and usable data have been remarkably elusive. In part the problem appears to extend from the requirement for a technique to assemble the data into meaningful assessments. There have been attempts to achieve this, THERP being one workable example of a (quasi) database which enables the data to be used meaningfully. However, in recent years more attention has been focused on the PerformanceShaping Factors (PSF) associated with human reliability. A “database for today” should therefore be developed in terms of PSF, as well as task/ behavioural descriptors, and possibly even psychological error mechanisms. However, this presumes that data on incidents and accidents are collected and categorised in terms of the PSF contributing to the incident, and such classification systems in practice are rare. The collection and generation of a small working database, based on incident records are outlined. This has been possible because the incident‐recording system at BNFL Sellafield does give information on PSF. Furthermore, the data have been integrated into the Human Reliability Management System which is a PSF‐based human reliability assessment system. Some of the data generated are presented, as well as the PSF associated with them, and an outline of the incident collection system is given. Lastly, aspects of human common mode failure or human dependent failures, particularly at the lower human error probability range, are discussed, as these are unlikely to be elicited from data collection studies, yet are important in human reliability assessment. One possible approach to the treatment of human dependent failures, the utilisation of human performance‐limiting values, is described.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Mohammad Sheikhalishahi, Liliane Pintelon and Ali Azadeh

– The purpose of this paper is to review current literature analyzing human factors in maintenance, and areas in need of further research are suggested.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review current literature analyzing human factors in maintenance, and areas in need of further research are suggested.

Design/methodology/approach

The review applies a novel framework for systematically categorizing human factors in maintenance into three major categories: human error/reliability calculation, workplace design/macro-ergonomics and human resource management. The framework further incorporates two well-known human factor frameworks, i.e., the Swiss Cheese model and the ergonomic domains framework.

Findings

Human factors in maintenance is a pressing problem. The framework yields important insights regarding the influence of human factors in maintenance decision making. By incorporating various approaches, a robust framework for analyzing human factors in maintenance is derived.

Originality/value

The framework assists decision makers and maintenance practitioners to evaluate the influence of human factors from different perspectives, e.g. human error, macro-ergonomics, work planning and human performance. Moreover, the review addresses an important subject in maintenance decision making more so in view of few human error reviews in maintenance literature.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Jan M. Myszewski

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the adverse impact of management systems on the occurrence of human errors.

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1922

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the adverse impact of management systems on the occurrence of human errors.

Design/methodology/approach

Conducted is systemic analysis of scenarios, which are illustrating creation of human errors, caused by functions of management systems. The text refers to a research study on mechanisms of errors committed by employees, conducted by the author in several organizations. In the text a special focus is given to the interaction between error‐generating mechanisms and management systems.

Findings

First, there are decisions made in favor of the management systems that increase risk of human errors in processes. The conflict between managers and employees, who are blamed for the errors, may obstruct the elimination of errors and the improvement of management systems. Second, managers are expected to resolve the conflict by establishing and maintaining a policy regarding prevention against system‐specific mechanisms of human error. The involvement of managers in improvement and establishing effective vertical communication in the management system are necessary to successful implementation of the policy. Third, a scheme of analyzing adverse effects of decisions is shown.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on some issues that decide on effectiveness of prevention of human errors. It provides explicit evidence of the necessity of the “management involvement” in the quality management system and respective suggestions for the improvement. The considerations may be useful for organizations that are highly sensitive to human errors such as healthcare institutions.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Sally Taylor‐Adams and Barry Kirwan

For many years there has been increasing concern about the effectsof human error in complex system safety and reliability. This concernhas been increased owing to…

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1355

Abstract

For many years there has been increasing concern about the effects of human error in complex system safety and reliability. This concern has been increased owing to accidents such as Chernobyl, Bhopal, Herald of Free Enterprise, Three Mile Island and the Kegworth air disaster. In the vast majority of these accidents, human error has played a critical role in the events precipitating the accident. Such accidents can in theory be predicted and prevented by risk assessment, in particular assessing the human contribution to risk. However, the collection of humanerror data has proved a difficult field for the past 30 years, and yet industry would benefit from the existence of a robust humanerror database. Provides therefore a brief historical resume of past humanerror databases, and discusses data collection and the inherent problems associated with data‐collection schemes. Goes on to outline a humanerror database currently being developed at Birmingham University, and presents information on regularly quantified humanerror types. Finally, gives a general synopsis of the research and provides a selection of real humanerror data points.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

B.S. Dhillon and Y. Liu

The aim of the paper is to present the impact of human errors in maintenance as found in the literature in order for practitioners to be aware of their impact and develop…

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11222

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to present the impact of human errors in maintenance as found in the literature in order for practitioners to be aware of their impact and develop actions to mitigate their effect.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper systematically categorizes the published literature and then analyzes and reviews it methodically.

Findings

Human error in maintenance is a pressing problem.

Practical implications

A maintenance person plays an important role in the reliability of equipment. It is also a well‐known fact that a significantly large proportion of total human errors occur during the maintenance phase. Human error in maintenance is a subject which in the past has not been given the amount of attention that it deserves. This paper will be useful to people working in the area of maintenance engineering, as it presents a general review of literature published on maintenance errors in various sectors of industry.

Originality/value

The paper contains a comprehensive listing of publications on the field in question and their classification according to industry. The paper will be useful to researchers, maintenance professionals and others concerned with maintenance to understand the importance of human error in maintenance.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Philip Lawrence and Simon Gill

This paper sets out to outline a human hazard analysis methodology as a tool for managing human error in aircraft maintenance, operations and production. The methodology…

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1614

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to outline a human hazard analysis methodology as a tool for managing human error in aircraft maintenance, operations and production. The methodology developed has been used in a slightly modified form on Airbus aircraft programmes. This paper aims to outline a method for managing human error in the field of aircraft design, maintenance and operations. Undertaking the research was motivated by the fact that aviation incidents and accidents still show a high percentage of human‐factors events as key causal factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted takes traditional aspects of the aircraft design system safety process, particularly fault tree analysis, and couples them with a structured tabular notation called a human error modes and effects analysis (HEMEA). HEMEA provides data, obtained from domain knowledge, in‐service experience and known error modes, about likely human‐factors events that could cause critical failure modes identified in the fault tree analysis. In essence the fault tree identifies the failure modes, while the HEMEA shows what kind of human‐factors events could trigger the relevant failure.

Findings

The authors found that the methodology works very effectively, but that it is very dependent on locating the relevant expert judgement and domain knowledge..

Research limitations/implications

The authors found that the methodology works very effectively, but that it is very dependent on locating the relevant expert judgement and domain knowledge. Using the method as a prototype, looking at aspects of a large aircraft fuel system, was very time‐consuming and the industry partner was concerned about the resource implications of implementing this process. Regarding future work, the researchers would like to explore how a knowledge management exercise might capture some of the domain knowledge to reduce the requirement for discursive, seminar‐type sessions with domain experts.

Practical implications

It was very clear that the sponsors and research partners in the aircraft industry were keen to use this method as part of the safety process. Airbus has used a modified form of the process on at least two programmes.

Originality/value

The authors are aware that the UK MOD uses fault tree analysis that includes human‐factors events. However, the researchers believe that the creation of the human error modes effects analysis is original. On the civil side of the aviation business this is the first time that human error issues have been included for systems other than the flightdeck. The research was clearly of major value to the UK Civil Aviation Authority and Airbus, who were the original sponsors.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Zhangming Ma, Heap-Yih Chong and Pin-Chao Liao

Human error is among the leading causes of construction-based accidents. Previous studies on the factors affecting human error are rather vague from the perspective of…

Abstract

Purpose

Human error is among the leading causes of construction-based accidents. Previous studies on the factors affecting human error are rather vague from the perspective of complex and changeable working environments. The purpose of this paper is to develop a dynamic causal model of human errors to improve safety management in the construction industry. A theoretical model is developed and tested through a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the authors defined the causal relationship between construction and human errors based on the cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM). A dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) was then developed by connecting time-variant causal relationships of human errors. Next, prediction, sensitivity analysis and diagnostic analysis of DBN were applied to demonstrate the function of this model. Finally, a case study of elevator installation was presented to verify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed approach in a construction work environment.

Findings

The results of the proposed model were closer to those of practice than previous static models, and the features of the systematization and dynamics are more efficient in adapting toward increasingly complex and changeable environments.

Originality/value

This research integrated CREAM as the theoretical foundation for a novel time-variant causal model of human errors in construction. Practically, this model highlights the hazards that potentially trigger human error occurrences, facilitating the implementation of proactive safety strategy and safety measures in advance.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Tarcisio Abreu Saurin, Carlos Torres Formoso and Fabricio Borges Cambraia

The purpose is to introduce a safety planning and control (SPC) model that has been integrated into the production planning and control process. The paper is concerned…

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2812

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to introduce a safety planning and control (SPC) model that has been integrated into the production planning and control process. The paper is concerned with the impact of this model on human error control, since both workers' and managers' errors are major contributing factors in accident causation.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis of this impact was based on two stages: the analysis of the main types of human errors detected in five sites in which the model has been implemented and a discussion on how the model contributes to the design of safe work systems from a cognitive engineering perspective.

Findings

The main conclusion is that six elements of the model (safety planning, near miss reporting, training, percentage of safe work packages indicator, participatory cycle, and planning and control diffusion) contribute to make both the boundaries of safe work visible and respected. Safety planning also helps to make the production system error‐tolerant to some extent. However, the analysis of causes of safety failures in the empirical studies pointed out a high incidence of violations of the boundaries (on average, 43.5 percent of the total safety failures), mostly by workers.

Research limitations/implications

Although improvement in the existing mechanisms might make the model more behavior‐oriented, a broader set of measures is necessary to achieve excellence in dealing with human errors. Also, additional empirical data are necessary to clarify the nature and frequency of the human errors that have impact in construction safety.

Originality/value

The model may help in devising more effective tools to reduce errors in construction.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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