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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Jaroslav Mackerle

Gives a bibliographical review of the error estimates and adaptive finite element methods from the theoretical as well as the application point of view. The bibliography…

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Abstract

Gives a bibliographical review of the error estimates and adaptive finite element methods from the theoretical as well as the application point of view. The bibliography at the end contains 2,177 references to papers, conference proceedings and theses/dissertations dealing with the subjects that were published in 1990‐2000.

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Engineering Computations, vol. 18 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Zhangming Ma, Heap-Yih Chong and Pin-Chao Liao

Human error is among the leading causes of construction-based accidents. Previous studies on the factors affecting human error are rather vague from the perspective of…

Abstract

Purpose

Human error is among the leading causes of construction-based accidents. Previous studies on the factors affecting human error are rather vague from the perspective of complex and changeable working environments. The purpose of this paper is to develop a dynamic causal model of human errors to improve safety management in the construction industry. A theoretical model is developed and tested through a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the authors defined the causal relationship between construction and human errors based on the cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM). A dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) was then developed by connecting time-variant causal relationships of human errors. Next, prediction, sensitivity analysis and diagnostic analysis of DBN were applied to demonstrate the function of this model. Finally, a case study of elevator installation was presented to verify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed approach in a construction work environment.

Findings

The results of the proposed model were closer to those of practice than previous static models, and the features of the systematization and dynamics are more efficient in adapting toward increasingly complex and changeable environments.

Originality/value

This research integrated CREAM as the theoretical foundation for a novel time-variant causal model of human errors in construction. Practically, this model highlights the hazards that potentially trigger human error occurrences, facilitating the implementation of proactive safety strategy and safety measures in advance.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Philip Lawrence and Simon Gill

This paper sets out to outline a human hazard analysis methodology as a tool for managing human error in aircraft maintenance, operations and production. The methodology…

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1605

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to outline a human hazard analysis methodology as a tool for managing human error in aircraft maintenance, operations and production. The methodology developed has been used in a slightly modified form on Airbus aircraft programmes. This paper aims to outline a method for managing human error in the field of aircraft design, maintenance and operations. Undertaking the research was motivated by the fact that aviation incidents and accidents still show a high percentage of human‐factors events as key causal factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted takes traditional aspects of the aircraft design system safety process, particularly fault tree analysis, and couples them with a structured tabular notation called a human error modes and effects analysis (HEMEA). HEMEA provides data, obtained from domain knowledge, in‐service experience and known error modes, about likely human‐factors events that could cause critical failure modes identified in the fault tree analysis. In essence the fault tree identifies the failure modes, while the HEMEA shows what kind of human‐factors events could trigger the relevant failure.

Findings

The authors found that the methodology works very effectively, but that it is very dependent on locating the relevant expert judgement and domain knowledge..

Research limitations/implications

The authors found that the methodology works very effectively, but that it is very dependent on locating the relevant expert judgement and domain knowledge. Using the method as a prototype, looking at aspects of a large aircraft fuel system, was very time‐consuming and the industry partner was concerned about the resource implications of implementing this process. Regarding future work, the researchers would like to explore how a knowledge management exercise might capture some of the domain knowledge to reduce the requirement for discursive, seminar‐type sessions with domain experts.

Practical implications

It was very clear that the sponsors and research partners in the aircraft industry were keen to use this method as part of the safety process. Airbus has used a modified form of the process on at least two programmes.

Originality/value

The authors are aware that the UK MOD uses fault tree analysis that includes human‐factors events. However, the researchers believe that the creation of the human error modes effects analysis is original. On the civil side of the aviation business this is the first time that human error issues have been included for systems other than the flightdeck. The research was clearly of major value to the UK Civil Aviation Authority and Airbus, who were the original sponsors.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

A. Dutta and C.V. Ramakrishnan

Presents a method of obtaining an optimal mesh in the finite element analysis of two‐dimensional linear elastodynamic problems under transient dynamic loading, which is…

Abstract

Presents a method of obtaining an optimal mesh in the finite element analysis of two‐dimensional linear elastodynamic problems under transient dynamic loading, which is based on a generalization of the Z‐Z criterion for discretization error estimation for time‐dependent problems. The optimal mesh limits the error due to discretization within a prescribed value, and studies of all other possible errors involved in finite element transient dynamic analysis are carried out systematically. Also proposes methods to study and limit the modal truncation error. Numerous examples show the capabilities of the proposed methods and the importance of the optimal mesh and modal truncation error in finite element transient dynamic analysis.

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Engineering Computations, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

D.B. Stephen and G.P. Steven

In computing eigenvalues for a large finite element system, it has been observed that the eigenvalue extractors produce eigenvectors that are in some sense more accurate…

Abstract

In computing eigenvalues for a large finite element system, it has been observed that the eigenvalue extractors produce eigenvectors that are in some sense more accurate than their corresponding eigenvalues. From this observation, uses a patch‐type technique based on the eigenvector for one mesh quality to provide an eigenvalue error indicator for the complex problem of out‐of‐plane plate vibration analysis. Tests show this indicator to be both accurate and reliable.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Silvana Maria R. Watson, João Lopes, Célia Oliveira and Sharon Judge

The purpose of this descriptive study is to investigate why some elementary children have difficulties mastering addition and subtraction calculation tasks.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this descriptive study is to investigate why some elementary children have difficulties mastering addition and subtraction calculation tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers have examined error types in addition and subtraction calculation made by 697 Portuguese students in elementary grades. Each student completed a written assessment of mathematical knowledge. A system code (e.g. FR = failure to regroup) has been used to grade the tests. A reliability check has been performed on 65 per cent randomly selected exams.

Findings

Data frequency analyses reveal that the most common type of error was miscalculation for both addition (n = 164; 38.6 per cent) and subtraction (n = 180; 21.7 per cent). The second most common error type was related to failure to regroup in addition (n = 74; 17.5 per cent) and subtraction (n = 139; 16.3 per cent). Frequency of error types by grade level has been provided. Findings from the hierarchical regression analyses indicate that students’ performance differences emerged as a function of error types which indicated students’ types of difficulties.

Research limitations/implications

There are several limitations of this study: the use of a convenient sample; all schools were located in the northern region of Portugal; the limited number of problems; and the time of the year of assessment.

Practical implications

Students’ errors suggested that their performance in calculation tasks is related to conceptual and procedural knowledge and skills. Error analysis allows teachers to better understand the individual performance of a diverse group and to tailor instruction to ensure that all students have an opportunity to succeed in mathematics.

Social implications

Error analysis helps teachers uncover individual students’ difficulties and deliver meaningful instruction to all students.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the international literature on error analysis and reinforces its value in diagnosing students’ type and severity of math difficulties.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Evica Stojiljkovic, Bojan Bijelic, Miroljub Grozdanovic, Marko Radovanovic and Igor Djokic

The purpose of this paper is to identify potential helicopter pilots’ errors during their interaction with the flight deck in the process of starting a helicopter in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify potential helicopter pilots’ errors during their interaction with the flight deck in the process of starting a helicopter in night-time conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic Human Error Reduction and Prediction Approach is used for the analysis of the pilot–flight deck interaction. This methodology was used for the identification of errors for 30 pilots during a period of 10 years. In total, 55 errors were identified, and most common errors noted are: error of omission, caused by pilots’ lack of attention or longer periods of no flying, and error of wrong execution, caused by misunderstanding a situation.

Findings

Hierarchical task analysis and classification of pilot’s tasks were used for the analysis of consequences, probability of occurrence, criticality and remedial strategies for the identified pilot error.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not give an ergonomic analysis of the flight deck, as that is not its subject. However, results of the research presented in this paper, together with results presented in references, clearly show that there are disadvantages in the ergonomic design of flight decks.

Practical implications

Based on the identified pilot errors and with respect of existing ergonomic solution, it is possible to begin with the reconstruction of flight decks.

Social implications

Higher quality of pilot–flight deck interaction must be ensured for both pilots’ and passengers’ safety, as even a slightest error can lead to catastrophic consequences.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in the fact that it points to the need for synergy of ergonomic design and human reliability methods.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 90 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Cleaver Symons and Alan Morris

Confidence in airframe structure integrity must never be compromised, particularly where the structure is safety critical. There are, however, increasing pressures, cost…

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Abstract

Confidence in airframe structure integrity must never be compromised, particularly where the structure is safety critical. There are, however, increasing pressures, cost being one of the most significant, to reduce or eliminate customized testing of airframes. Certification of airframes by analysis is, therefore, desirable. The question to be answered is ‐ is it possible? Provides an overview of five years’ work in producing a methodology and best practice for structural analysis, which provides a concrete procedure for answering this question.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Xi Luo, Yingjie Zhang and Lin Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to improve the positioning accuracy of 6-Dof serial robot by the way of error compensation and sensitivity analysis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the positioning accuracy of 6-Dof serial robot by the way of error compensation and sensitivity analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the Denavit–Hartenberg matrix is used to construct the kinematics models of the robot; the effects from individual joint and several joints on the end effector are estimated by simulation. Then, an error model based on joint clearance is proposed so that the positioning accuracy at any position of joints can be predicted for compensation. Through the simulation of the curve path, the validity of the error compensation model is verified. Finally, the experimental results show that the error compensation method can improve the positioning accuracy of a two joint exoskeleton robot by nearly 76.46%.

Findings

Through the analysis of joint error sensitivity, it is found that the first three joints, especially joint 2, contribute a lot to the positioning accuracy of the robot, which provides guidance for the accuracy allocation of the robot. In addition, this paper creatively puts forward the error model based on joint clearance, and the error compensation method which decouples the positioning accuracy into joint errors.

Originality/value

It provides a new idea for error modeling and error compensation of 6-Dof serial robot. Combining sensitivity analysis results with error compensation can effectively improve the positioning accuracy of the robot, and provide convenience for welding robot and other robots that need high positioning accuracy.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Xin Ye, Pan Liu, Zhijing Zhang, Chao Shao and Yan Li

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the sensitivity of the motion error parameters in microassembly process, thereby improving the assembly accuracy. The motion errors

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the sensitivity of the motion error parameters in microassembly process, thereby improving the assembly accuracy. The motion errors of the precision motion stages directly affect the final assembly quality after the machine visual alignment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the error parameters of the in-house microassembly system with coaxial alignment function, builds the error transfer model by the multi-body system theory, analyzes the error sensitivity on the sensitive direction using the Sobol method, which was based on variance, and then gets the ones which made a great degree of influence. Before the sensitivity analyzing, parts of the error sources have been measured to obtain their distribution ranges.

Findings

The results of the sensitivity analysis by the Sobol method, which was based on variance, are coincident with the theoretical analysis. Besides, the results provide a reference for the error compensation in control process, for the selection of the precision motion stages and for the installation index of the motion stages of the assembly system with coaxial alignment.

Originality/value

This kind of error sensitivity analysis method is of great significance for improving the assembly accuracy after visual system positioning, and increasing efficiency from the initial motion stage selection to final error compensation for designers. It is suitable for general precision motion systems be of multi-degree of freedom, for the method of modeling, measuring and analyzing used in this paper are all universal and applicative.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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