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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Suresh Cuganesan and Clinton Free

The authors examined how squad members within an Australian state police force perceived and attached enabling or coercive meanings to a suite of management control system

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examined how squad members within an Australian state police force perceived and attached enabling or coercive meanings to a suite of management control system (MCS) changes that were new public management (NPM) inspired.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a longitudinal case study of a large Australian state police department utilizing an abductive research design.

Findings

The authors found that identification processes strongly conditioned the reception of the MCS changes introduced. Initially, the authors observed mixed interpretations of controls as both enabling and coercive. Over time, these changes were seen to be coercive because they threatened interpersonal relationships and the importance and efficacy of squads in combating serious and organized crime.

Research limitations/implications

The authors contributed to MCSs literature by revealing the critical role that multifaceted relational and collective identification processes played in shaping interpretations of controls as enabling–coercive. The authors build on this to elaborate on the notion of employees’ centricity in the MCS design.

Practical implications

This study suggests that, in complex organizational settings, the MCS design and change should reckon with pre-existing patterns of employees’ identification.

Originality/value

The authors suggested shifting the starting point for contemplating the MCS change: from looking at how what employees do is controlled to how the change impacts and how employees feel about who they are. When applied to the MCS design, employee centricity highlights the value of collaborative co-design, attentiveness to relational identification between employees, feedback and interaction in place of inferred management expectations and traditional mechanistic approaches.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Siu Mee Cheng and Leslee J. Thompson

A performance management system has been implemented by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO). This system allows for the monitoring and management of 11 integrated cancer programs…

Abstract

Purpose

A performance management system has been implemented by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO). This system allows for the monitoring and management of 11 integrated cancer programs (ICPs) across the Province of Ontario. The system comprises of four elements: reporting frequency, reporting requirements, review meetings and accountability and continuous improvement activities. CCO and the ICPs have recently completed quarterly performance review exercises for the last two quarters of the fiscal year 2004‐2005. The purpose of this paper is to address some of the key lessons learned.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an outline of the CCO performance management system.

Findings

These lessons included: data must be valid and reliable; performance management requires commitments from both parties in the performance review exercises; streamlining performance reporting is beneficial; technology infrastructure which allows for cohesive management of data is vital for a sustainable performance management system; performance indicators need to stand up to scrutiny by both parties; and providing comparative data across the province is valuable. Critical success factors which would help to ensure a successful performance management system include: corporate engagement from various parts of an organization in the review exercises; desire to focus on performance improvement and avoidance of blaming; and strong data management systems.

Practical implications

The performance management system is a practical and sustainable system that allows for performance improvement of cancer care services. It can be a vital tool to enhance accountability within the health care system.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that the performance management system supports accountability in the cancer care system for Ontario, and reflects the principles of the provincial governments commitment to continuous improvement of healthcare.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

A. Raouf, Zulfiqar Ali and S.O. Duffuaa

Maintenance management consists of an aggregate effort to performmaintenance by effectively utilizing manpower and material through theapplication of standard procedures…

Abstract

Maintenance management consists of an aggregate effort to perform maintenance by effectively utilizing manpower and material through the application of standard procedures. It is a complex and multifaceted task. An ever‐growing number of computerized maintenance management information systems are available on the market to facilitate this task. In order to install a computerized maintenance management system, a company has two options: either to buy or to develop such a system. Briefly describes the major functions of maintenance management and suggests an instrument to evaluate comparatively the available computerized maintenance management systems.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Stanislav Karapetrovic and Walter Willborn

Discusses quality and environmental management systems integration. Concepts of a system and a “system of systems” are addressed, followed by a description of different…

Abstract

Discusses quality and environmental management systems integration. Concepts of a system and a “system of systems” are addressed, followed by a description of different management systems, and their interrelations and integration. Subsequently, strategies for integration of the quality system based on the ISO 9001 standard and the ISO 14001 environmental management system are presented. The harmonization of related audit sub‐systems, namely ISO 10011 and ISO 14010/11/12 is also addressed. Finally, a discussion on the development of a generic performance management system is provided.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Xinya Yang, Qunyi Wei and Xiaodong Peng

The purpose of this article is to present a subsection circulatory management (SCM) model of Library 2.0. The design idea of Library 2.0 system architecture is to be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present a subsection circulatory management (SCM) model of Library 2.0. The design idea of Library 2.0 system architecture is to be illustrated and a five‐tier model of service‐oriented architecture (SOA) is to be put forward and analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

The SOA model conforms to the desires of Library 2.0. Libraries require integration of literature resources, knowledge services and operations management and together all these integrations must be based on the user service. The realization of the concept and technology of Library 2.0 is similar with the SOA model.

Findings

Current library management systems (LMS) remain at the era of Library 1.0, which focused on literature management. The new design principles are aiming to manage library resources much better. Library 2.0 must break through the current framework, and adopt a multilayer structure, user‐centered and service‐oriented system architecture to integrate the resources, the services and managements. Amongst other things, Library 2.0 should utilize the multilayer architecture based on the module mode, improve the flexibility and adaptability of modern management systems, both in system configuration and operational management.

Originality/value

The SOA model is applied in Library 2.0 for the first time and is divided into five tiers – hardware tier, system tier, data tier, operation management tier and knowledge service tier. According to the architecture, three application systems – LMS based on librarians, knowledge service system based on patrons, and knowledge search engine, are designed.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Jos van Iwaarden, Ton van der Wiele, Roger Williams and Barrie Dale

In many industries (e.g. cars and clothing) manufacturing complexity and unpredictability have increased over the last couple of years because of an increasing variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

In many industries (e.g. cars and clothing) manufacturing complexity and unpredictability have increased over the last couple of years because of an increasing variety of products and shortening product life cycles. At the same time the manufacturers in these industries appear to have more problems with maintaining high quality levels. This paper aims to develop a methodology to study the effects of these developments on quality management systems.

Design/methodology/approach

At three European automotive manufacturers the two trends have been studied by means of a case study approach. Simons' four levers of control model is utilised to categorise and interpret the results of the case studies.

Findings

The application of a management control model in the field of quality management is found to be useful in explaining what changes are necessary to maintain high quality levels. From the case studies in the automotive sector it is concluded that there is a shift in quality management systems from a diagnostic towards a more interactive approach. This is in line with what can be expected as a result of the increasing uncertainty in the automotive sector, caused by shortening life cycles of car models and smaller batch sizes.

Originality/value

This research presents a novel application of Simons' four levers of control model to the field of quality management. Based on the experience with three case studies at European automotive manufacturers, this approach seems to have potential.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Xiangyi Lin, Qingpu Zhang and Xiaolin Han

The purpose of this paper is to utilize “Wuli‐Shili‐Renli (WSR)” system methodology to analyze complexity of knowledge and knowledge management and create models for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilize “Wuli‐Shili‐Renli (WSR)” system methodology to analyze complexity of knowledge and knowledge management and create models for knowledge management system (KMS) synthetically.

Design/methodology/approach

As a complex system, knowledge management should be analyzed and established by system methodologies. There are many system methodologies. Owing to WSR is characteristic of oriental culture; the paper introduces concept and working process of WSR system methodology in knowledge management from WSR perspective.

Findings

WSR system methodology can be used to analyze contents of WSR in KMS and to establish an effective KMS.

Research limitations/implications

How to define WSR in KMS is a little difficult for users.

Practical implications

A new approach for system analysis and establishment of a successful KMS.

Originality/value

The paper shows how the WSR system approach can integrate quantitative approach and qualitative analysis to analyze and establish a KMS synthetically.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 38 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

W.B. Adeoti‐Adekeye

Presents a discussion on the importance of management information systems in management. It explains the role of information, as an essential tool for managers in planning…

Abstract

Presents a discussion on the importance of management information systems in management. It explains the role of information, as an essential tool for managers in planning and decision making. It describes MIS as a well co‐ordinated information system, a database that is to provide management with needed information to plan and make decisions. Modern technology has further made the resort to MIS in management imperative because of the changing circumstances and environment. Also identifies some problems which can hinder effective use of MIS. These are lack of management involvement in the design; poor appreciation of mangement support. Finally, recommends that organizations, both private and public; commercial and non‐commercial should endeavour to set up an MIS unit in their organizations so that adequate information can be put at the disposal of their management.

Details

Library Review, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

M. Knahl, H.D. Hofmann and A. Phippen

It is proposed that future work should move on from existing network and system management methodologies to consider enhancing the management methodology for ATM and other…

Abstract

It is proposed that future work should move on from existing network and system management methodologies to consider enhancing the management methodology for ATM and other networking technologies to meet existing and future requirements. This paper outlines an area where significant potential for further research exists and proposes a component‐based management architecture. The discussion indentifies the technological limitations and architectural drawbacks of current solutions and proposes the extension of existing services and an enhanced management framework to overcome the current restrictions.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Shouhong Wang

Plant configuration management systems address all phases of the plant’s life cycle, from engineering design, re‐design, maintenance, to operations. However, as yet little…

Abstract

Plant configuration management systems address all phases of the plant’s life cycle, from engineering design, re‐design, maintenance, to operations. However, as yet little research has been reported on plant configuration management information systems analysis. During the past decade, the object‐oriented approach has received much attention in information systems development. This paper describes an object structure for plant configuration management systems analysis. Three major aspects of configuration management (maintenance, re‐design change, and business process) and fundamental types of objects engaged in configuration management are described. The association between these objects is then built through identifying the messages between the objects. Practical application of this framework shows that it is useful for the analysis and design of a plant configuration management information system.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 99 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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