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Article

Kiran Mahasuar

This paper aims to focus on the insights from the brand journey of Horlicks in India and evolution of the health food drinks (HFD) category.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the insights from the brand journey of Horlicks in India and evolution of the health food drinks (HFD) category.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the key reasons for the slowdown in the HFD category and the descent of brand Horlicks in India. It follows the strategic decisions and actions that Horlicks’ parent GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare took over its journey of close to 100 years. It also highlights the cardinal mistakes that it made in distribution networks, brand extensions, etc. and how these could have possibly eroded the brand equity of Horlicks.

Findings

Horlicks as a brand made many strategic errors. It frequently and needlessly fiddled with unrelated categories in contrast to its nutrition agenda. It unnecessarily spent on developing brand extensions in unhealthy categories that customers did not value or relate to. It was strategically blinded by the dominance in two geographies and continued to be under-invested in distribution networks in others. In addition, it took too long to read the writing on the wall in terms of growing consumer consciousness about the presence of sugar and fats in health foods. Even when clear signals were available of the impending slowdown the HFD category faced, despite being the market leader in the HFD segment, it showed limited urgency to foster an innovation to bolster the category.

Practical implications

Companies need to focus on a sharp business model and not try to be everything for everyone. Companies that gain valuable insight of what its customers value and design their business model to satisfy these requirements have higher chances of surviving through the weft and warp of time.

Originality/value

The paper considers the context of the highly dynamic fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry in India. It is an industry where for some of the categories like HFD, the brand equity of the mother brand may or may not have a rub-off effect on brand extensions, or dominance in a particular geography may not translate to similar dominance in another geography owing to heterogeneity factor. In such a scenario, brands such as Horlicks, which do not have a consistent and coherent strategy, find it difficult to grow their market share or the category. It provides insights into the common pitfalls in brand development strategy and how it can be avoided.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article

Seema Gupta

The purpose of this case is to illustrate the strategic as well as tactical dimensions of comparative advertising. The case can be used to demonstrate that the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case is to illustrate the strategic as well as tactical dimensions of comparative advertising. The case can be used to demonstrate that the implications of comparative advertising can be analyzed from different perspectives – consumer behavior, legal framework and business and marketing strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This case was developed solely from secondary sources as a basis for class discussion. It is not intended to serve as an endorsement, source of primary data or an illustration of either effective or ineffective management.

Findings

While comparative advertising appears to be a tactic by which a message about the brand is communicated to the target audience, it is embedded in business and marketing strategy.

Originality/value

With competition intensifying across industries and product categories, comparative advertising will only increase and this case can provide useful insights into the emerging phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

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Article

A pet phrase of a competent teacher of mathematics years ago was: “Figures by themselves have no meaning.” And everyone knows that statistics are deceitful things. Mr. W…

Abstract

A pet phrase of a competent teacher of mathematics years ago was: “Figures by themselves have no meaning.” And everyone knows that statistics are deceitful things. Mr. W. Johnston's batting average in this country this year was 102, although his position in the batting order was never higher than number 11. He is reported indeed to have said of himself: “I am the ferret of the Australian team; they put me in after the rabbits.” But his position at the head of the batting averages could lead to a preposterously erroneous conclusion.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 55 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Rajinder Kaur and Rashmi Aggarwal

This study aims to compile the present situation of comparative advertisement in Indian markets and the existing legal remedies by citing some factual cases from the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compile the present situation of comparative advertisement in Indian markets and the existing legal remedies by citing some factual cases from the industry and important judicial pronouncements.

Design/methodology/approach

It is a qualitative research based on primary and secondary source of information. Secondary sources comprise of statutory provisions of relevant act, articles/news items available in academic/trade journals and information generated from Government of India web sites. Primary research involved face-to-face interactions with practising advocates from Delhi High Court and Supreme Court of India in the area of trademarks. Information was collected on parameters related to efficacy, applicability, enforceability, monitoring, and legal issues of trademarks and disparagements.

Findings

In India, comparative advertisement is relatively a new concept and the lawful remedies are not that strong as that is other countries. In the absence of the stringent laws, the practice of comparative advertisement has seen many derogatory consequences a few are mentioned here. The paper concludes by giving recommendations on the issues of legal aspects of comparative advertisement in India.

Originality/value

This research paper attempts to provide an overall understanding of judicial environment on comparative advertisement in India which is still at its nascent stage.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Case study

Farah Naz Baig

Advertising, Marketing Management, Integrated Marketing Communications.

Abstract

Subject area

Advertising, Marketing Management, Integrated Marketing Communications.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate third year/fourth year students. The case is positioned at the beginning of the course.

Case overview

The case aims to help the students in understanding the concepts of push and pull marketing in the nutritional supplement category which is different from the FMCG sector in terms of the decision-making process and consumer behavior. The brand is bought by the mother, consumed by the kids and endorsed by the doctors. The brand manager faces the dilemma of budget division on push vs pull marketing considering the previous back lash from the doctors when the company shifted toward pull marketing.

Expected learning outcomes

By the end of the case, the students should have understood the following concepts: push versus pull marketing, decision-making unit, decision-making process and customer acquisition vs retention efforts.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

Professor J. C. Drummond concluded his Cantor Lectures in January, 1938, by a quotation from Thomas Muffett's Healths Improvement, published in 1655: “Wherefore let us…

Abstract

Professor J. C. Drummond concluded his Cantor Lectures in January, 1938, by a quotation from Thomas Muffett's Healths Improvement, published in 1655: “Wherefore let us neither with the impudent, call diet a frivolous knowledge, or a curious science with the imprudent; but embrace it as the leader to perfit health (which as the wise man sayeth) is above gold, and a sound body above all riches.” Diet as the leader to perfect health: let us consider this for a moment in connection with the present subject. The object of the application of science to food is essentially the improvement of the diet of the people of the world. That, at any rate, is the long view of the question, though other motives may actuate certain groups at certain times. To‐day, for example, in this country, the main object of scientific work is to feed the population as efficiently as possible with the food available. Science in Germany for several years has been the handmaiden of the Nazi party and their four years' plan has been far more scientifically developed than any food plan in this country (so far as is at present obvious). It may be taken as certain that science applied to food has improved the diet of the people, although governments and industry have not necessarily always utilised the knowledge gained with this end in view, a position that obviously applies to all new discoveries in science. Scientists engaged in studies concerning food have the development of the knowledge of food chemistry either directly or indirectly as their main object; the majority are not concerned with the application of the results of this knowledge. Before dealing in detail with a few of the particular aspects of the application of chemistry to food, its production, its treatment, its storage and its service, I would briefly summarise the activities of the scientist as follows. He seeks to find the reason for the rule‐of‐thumb methods of the farmer, the stock‐breeder, the baker, the brewer, the physician, the requirements of the consumer himself, and, having found the explanation, he seeks to remove the unknowns, to standardise procedure, and to improve the process. This, I think, sums up the work of the scientist, and in doing this his studies lead him into every phase of the problems of the feeding of the people. Initially the chemist devoted his particular attention to the purity of foods. He did not know what “purity” entailed, neither do we know to‐day; like all knowledge, the science of food is an ever‐widening circle. The theory of “calorie” feeding has given place to the “vitamin” hypothesis, the limitations of which are now being more and more realised; tomorrow or next year a new concept of food and diets will be developed. The studies in the “purity” of food undertaken by the predecessors of the present members of the “Society of Public Analysts and other Analytical Chemists” were of fundamental importance. The objects of that Society, founded in 1874, are not without significance. Broadly they may be stated as follows: The study of analytical chemistry and of questions relating to the adulteration of articles of food, and the promotion of the efficiency and proper administration of the laws relating to the repression of adulteration. For the moment I wish to stress just one of these objects, namely, the study of analytical chemistry. Without reliable methods of analysis, studies in the composition of food are useless; the importance of a large proportion of the work published to‐day has to be discounted because of failure to appreciate the importance of reliable methods of analysis. It is only by the light of careful analysis that the picture of the composition of a food can be thrown on to a screen and examined. Appreciation of the composition of the food is the key which will open the door to a knowledge of its reactions, not only in its production, but also in its digestion by the human being. Without the work of the analysts, the research worker is unable to appreciate the influence of the facts he may discover. In this country the field of scientific investigation is covered by a number of organisations, Government‐controlled, partially Government‐controlled and private (the private consisting of academic workers in universities and colleges and the laboratories of the large commercial firms concerned with food production). Problems of the production of basic foods, of manufacture, of cooking, of storage and preservation and of distribution are all investigated. The science of agriculture is very modern, and it is only in comparatively recent years that chemistry, as such, has been seriously applied to this branch of practical science. In this country, the Rothamsted Experimental Station at Harpenden, founded in 1843, has been foremost in trying to collate scientific data with details of farming practice. Other important research stations, such as the Long Ashton Research Station, the Chipping Campden Station, the Rowett Institute, the National Institute for Research in Dairying, are all products of the present century. These bodies are essentially concerned with the production of the basic materials, fruit, cereals, meat, etc., for the food manufacturer, although this limitation of activity is not applicable everywhere; for example, Long Ashton devotes particular attention to the cider industry, Chipping Campden to canning, and Reading to cheese and other milk products. The next stage, food manufacture in all its phases, is in this country covered by the Food Investigation Board of the D.S.I.R. and by a number of Research Associations which are jointly supported by the Government and by member firms. But by far the greater proportion of scientific work on food manufacture is carried out in the laboratories of the great food firms. The Food Group of the Society of Chemical Industry has been active in arranging meetings concerned with the chemistry of food and has helped considerably to foster free discussion. In problems of distribution the food scientist has collaborated with the Royal Sanitary Institute and the Association of Medical Officers of Health. This collaboration has been of the greatest use, because it is of little worth for the food manufacturer to produce wholesome food if in its distribution the shopkeeper does not take the necessary precautions to see that the food is handed to the purchaser in as good a condition as the precautions taken in its production warrant. Dr. Andrew Borde, the seventeenth‐century physician, wrote in his Breviary of Dyet—“A good cook is half a physician for the chief physic dotli come from the kitchen, wherefore the physician and the cook must consult together.” A striking commentary on this thought has lately appeared in the preface to a book by McCance and Widdowson, published under the regis of the Medical Research Council: “The nutritional dietetic treatment of disease, as well as research into problems of human nutrition, demand an exact knowledge of the chemical composition of food.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part

Justin Pidot

This chapter identifies and analyzes three systemic obstacles to American public policy addressing natural disasters: symbolic obstacles, cognitive obstacles, and…

Abstract

This chapter identifies and analyzes three systemic obstacles to American public policy addressing natural disasters: symbolic obstacles, cognitive obstacles, and structural obstacles. The way we talk about natural disaster, the way we think about the risks of building in hazardous places, and structural aspects of American political institutions all favor development over restraint. These forces have such strength that in the wake of most disasters society automatically and thoughtlessly responds by rebuilding what was damaged or destroyed, even if reconstruction perpetuates disaster vulnerability. Only by addressing each of the obstacles identified are reform efforts likely to succeed.

Details

Special Issue Cassandra’s Curse: The Law and Foreseeable Future Disasters
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-299-3

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Political Economy of Policy Reform: Essays in Honor of J. Michael Finger
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-816-3

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Article

At a recent meeting of the Glasgow Grocers' and Provision Merchants' Association, it was alleged that there are provision merchants in Glasgow who are doing a large…

Abstract

At a recent meeting of the Glasgow Grocers' and Provision Merchants' Association, it was alleged that there are provision merchants in Glasgow who are doing a large business in selling margarine as butter at 1s. 2d. per pound. In commenting upon this statement The Grocer very properly urges that the officials of the Association referred to should take prompt steps to place the facts in their possession before the Glasgow authorities and their officers, and observes that in certain cities and towns—Birmingham, for example—the grocers' associations have co‐operated with the authorities in their efforts to suppress illegal trading, particularly in regard to the sale of margarine as butter. It appears that one of the members of the Glasgow Association expressed the opinion that the Margarine Act has been a failure and that shopkeepers who sell margarine as butter should be charged with obtaining money under false pretences.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 17 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Aeli Roberts, John Kelsey, Hedley Smyth and Adam Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between health and safety (H&S) and organisational culture in project business, in particular to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between health and safety (H&S) and organisational culture in project business, in particular to explore the validity of current cognitive emphases of linear organisational maturity towards a “safety culture”, and normative models and prescriptions.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretative methodology is employed, informed by ethnography (Douglas' cultural theory) and clinical consultative (Schein's model) approaches, using case‐based analysis comprising seven project business organisations.

Findings

The cases were characterized by diverse organisational cultures and diverse H&S practices informed by habits and intuitive behaviour, as well as cognitive strategies and decisions for implementation. H&S was not the top priority for these cases. Good performance related to alignment with the prevailing culture rather than pursuit of a “safety culture”.

Research limitations/implications

The term “safety culture” is misdirected; greater attention on what is, rather than normative models and prescription, is necessary. Generalisation is limited by the case‐based approach.

Practical implications

Practitioners need to pay more attention to organisational culture and alignment of H&S practices, to the unintended consequences of prescriptions, and robust systems.

Social implications

The way activities are conducted requires awareness of the prevailing culture in order to align the structure and processes to the culture for effective operations. These implications are general, and within project business and management, Failure to do so carries increased risk of failing to satisfy business and broader stakeholder interests.

Originality/value

Anomalies in H&S research and practice are challenged, especially “safety culture” and normative approaches. The contribution is the combination employment of the Schein and Douglas models to understand organisational culture and H&S cultural alignment.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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