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Article

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems…

Abstract

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems new. This will sometimes happen after a long period of indecision or when things are extremely difficult, as they have long been for the country, in most homes and among ordinary individuals. Watching one's life savings dwindle away, the nest‐egg laid down for security in an uncertain world, is a frightening process. This has happened to the nation, once the richest in the world, and ot its elderly people, most of them taught the habit of saving in early youth. We are also taught that what has been is past changing; the clock cannot be put back, and the largesse—much of it going to unprincipled spongers—distributed by a spendthrift Government as token relief is no answer, not even to present difficulties. The response can only come by a change of heart in those whose brutal selfishness have caused it all; and this may be a long time in coming. In the meantime, it is a useful exercise to consider our assets, to recognize those which must be protected at all costs and upon which, when sanity returns, the future depends.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Deborah Albon

The purpose of this paper is to examine why the uptake of free milk in a particular nursery class was low, to explore the meanings children attribute to drinks given to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine why the uptake of free milk in a particular nursery class was low, to explore the meanings children attribute to drinks given to them in school and those brought from home, and make suggestions as to what might be done to improve children's intake of free school milk.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a case study of a nursery class attached to a primary school in West London. A total of 24 morning sessions were observed, comprising of 72 snack times. In addition, interviews were carried out with parents and early years' practitioners i.e. teachers and nursery nurses. Children's views were elicited through use of narrative observations and an activity using their drinks' cartons.

Findings

This study found that these young children linked drinks brought in from home to having choices whereas drinking school milk was associated with having little or no choice. Unlike school milk, drinks from home were linked to stories of personal identity and family life. The children seemed to exert pressure on their parents to provide them with a drink from home and appeared to be attracted to drinks that included representations of characters from popular culture as well as particular brands.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on one case study, therefore issues raised may not be generalisable to all nursery settings.

Practical implications

This paper encourages early years' practitioners to look in detail at how they organize snack times and the way that this might contribute to negative perceptions of healthy foods/drinks. It offers practical suggestions around how the uptake of milk could be improved in a nursery setting, emphasizing the need for the active involvement of the children. In addition, the study highlights the importance of informal as well as formal discussions with parents about food and drinks. The study recommends that improvements need to be made to early years' practitioners' initial and subsequent training in this area, given the significant role they play in health promotion.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in the way it elicits the active participation of young children in the research as well as the focus on the minutiae of nursery practice and its implications for promoting healthy eating/drinking.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

The New Year will see Britain a member of the largest multi‐national free trade area in the world and there must be few who see it as anything less than the beginning of a…

Abstract

The New Year will see Britain a member of the largest multi‐national free trade area in the world and there must be few who see it as anything less than the beginning of a new era, in trade, its trends, customs and usages and especially in the field of labour, relations, mobility, practices. Much can be foreseen but to some extent it is all very unpredictable. Optimists see it as a vast market of 250 millions, with a lot of money in their pockets, waiting for British exports; others, not quite so sure, fear the movement of trade may well be in reverse and if the increasing number of great articulated motor trucks, heavily laden with food and other goods, now spilling from the Channel ports into the roads of Kent are an indication, the last could well be true. They come from faraway places, not all in the European Economic Community; from Yugoslavia and Budapest, cities of the Rhineland, from Amsterdam, Stuttgart, Mulhouse and Milano. Kent has had its invasions before, with the Legions of Claudius and in 1940 when the battle roared through the Kentish skies. Hitherto quiet villagers are now in revolt against the pre‐juggernaut invasion; they, too, fear more will come with the enlarged EEC, thundering through their one‐street communities.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 74 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Niraj Kumar and Subhajyoti Ray

The purpose of this paper is to examine the consumption patterns and attitudes towards soft drinks among Indian youth.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the consumption patterns and attitudes towards soft drinks among Indian youth.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to investigate consumption patterns, attitudes, and socio-demographic profiles of college-attending respondents between the ages of 18 and 30. Cluster analysis and factor analysis were undertaken to obtain a better understanding of the attitudes among young consumers towards soft drinks. A logistic regression model was used as a predictor to distinguish between frequent and non-frequent soft drink consumers.

Findings

Indian youths preferred diet drinks and fruit juices more than regular soft drinks. Soft drinks were mostly consumed as distinct drinks (not as substitutes) and on specific occasions. Easy availability of soft drinks at the locations closure to consumers was a critical factor in determining consumers’ purchase and consumption level. Attitude towards the utility and nutritional dimensions of soft drinks had a positive and significant influence on the frequency of consumption.

Practical implications

To remain competitive, soft drinks’ companies need to focus more on healthy products and those that are refreshing and relaxing.

Social implications

Regulating the availability of soft drinks in and around educational institutions will affect consumption of soft drinks and reduce diseases.

Originality/value

Only a few studies investigating consumption patterns and attitudes among Indian youth towards soft drinks. This study attempts to fill the gap.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Pavleen Soni and Jyoti Vohra

This paper aims to identify the nature of themes/appeals used in food commercials shown on children’s networks in India. Marketers use various themes/appeals in TV…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the nature of themes/appeals used in food commercials shown on children’s networks in India. Marketers use various themes/appeals in TV advertisements to influence food consumption habits of children. Children are also found to focus on these appeals while selecting foods rather than using nutritional value as a criteria to select foods.

Design/methodology/approach

For the present study, a content analysis of 114 discrete food commercials broadcast on children’s networks was done. These were further analysed to collect data on themes/appeals used in them. SPSS 19.0 was used to record the data and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis.

Findings

A majority of food advertisements which were broadcast during children’s programmes included confectionery, ice creams and dairy products, baked products and ready-to-cook food items. Grazing was found to be the most frequently used appeal in these food advertisements. This was followed by taste/flavour/smell/texture, fun/happiness, being “cool”, adult approval/disapproval, family ties and so on. However, a majority of these advertisements did not feature any health-related message.

Practical implications

The study highlights the need for strategic actions by all stakeholders interested in protecting well-being of children. Taking account of the promotional tactics used by food marketers, parents as well as governmental agencies must strongly take steps to check these practices.

Originality/value

As no such study has already been conducted in India (to the best of researcher’s knowledge), this study potentially helps in abridging gaps in literature.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article

Michael Heasman and Spencer Henson

Presents the results of a postal questionnaire to UK food and drink manufacturers on the costs of compliance with food regulation. In particular, the questionnaire focused…

Abstract

Presents the results of a postal questionnaire to UK food and drink manufacturers on the costs of compliance with food regulation. In particular, the questionnaire focused on the usefulness of compliance cost assessments ‐ introduced by the Government in 1985 across all government departments as an analytical tool for assessing the regulatory costs to business ‐ as they relate to food businesses. Explains that the questionnaire sought to establish to what extent food companies actually costed the impact of food regulation on their business operations and explored other aspects of food regulation, such as the benefits and constraints. Reports the results which gave some unexpected insights on the costs of compliance with food regulation. For example, the majority of respondents were not aware that the Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Food carried out compliance cost assessments on food regulation; around two‐thirds of the sample found it “difficult” or “very difficult” to identify where compliance costs would affect their company and an even greater proportion (more than three‐quarters) said they would have problems quantifying compliance costs. Concludes that the compliance cost assessment, as a tool for helping to analyse the cost of food regulation on businesses, is an inappropriate method for the food sector and the development of new methods should be considered.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Kiran Mahasuar

This paper aims to focus on the insights from the brand journey of Horlicks in India and evolution of the health food drinks (HFD) category.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the insights from the brand journey of Horlicks in India and evolution of the health food drinks (HFD) category.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the key reasons for the slowdown in the HFD category and the descent of brand Horlicks in India. It follows the strategic decisions and actions that Horlicks’ parent GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare took over its journey of close to 100 years. It also highlights the cardinal mistakes that it made in distribution networks, brand extensions, etc. and how these could have possibly eroded the brand equity of Horlicks.

Findings

Horlicks as a brand made many strategic errors. It frequently and needlessly fiddled with unrelated categories in contrast to its nutrition agenda. It unnecessarily spent on developing brand extensions in unhealthy categories that customers did not value or relate to. It was strategically blinded by the dominance in two geographies and continued to be under-invested in distribution networks in others. In addition, it took too long to read the writing on the wall in terms of growing consumer consciousness about the presence of sugar and fats in health foods. Even when clear signals were available of the impending slowdown the HFD category faced, despite being the market leader in the HFD segment, it showed limited urgency to foster an innovation to bolster the category.

Practical implications

Companies need to focus on a sharp business model and not try to be everything for everyone. Companies that gain valuable insight of what its customers value and design their business model to satisfy these requirements have higher chances of surviving through the weft and warp of time.

Originality/value

The paper considers the context of the highly dynamic fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry in India. It is an industry where for some of the categories like HFD, the brand equity of the mother brand may or may not have a rub-off effect on brand extensions, or dominance in a particular geography may not translate to similar dominance in another geography owing to heterogeneity factor. In such a scenario, brands such as Horlicks, which do not have a consistent and coherent strategy, find it difficult to grow their market share or the category. It provides insights into the common pitfalls in brand development strategy and how it can be avoided.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article

Ivana First and Staša Brozina

The purpose of this paper is to test whether differences in motives for healthy food consumption stem from differences in cultural dimensions and whether cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test whether differences in motives for healthy food consumption stem from differences in cultural dimensions and whether cultural dimensions could serve as predictors for health food consumption motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study correlated secondary data on motives for healthy food consumption in a number of West European countries to cultural dimensions of those countries. In addition, primary data for prime motives of healthy food consumption were collected for Croatian consumers.

Findings

Influence of cultural dimensions was partly confirmed and that only for individualism and assertiveness, while human orientation and uncertainty avoidance showed no correlation to organic food consumption motivation. Croatian consumers display homogeneous collective awareness, i.e. they almost exclusively consider health as prime consumption motive.

Research limitations/implications

Correlation analysis was conducted on a small data set; the units of analysis were not distributed along the whole range of independent variables (cultural dimensions), coding of motives might be too robust. Future research should better tackle the exposed problems and also aim at discovering alternative antecedents that could improve prediction of prevailing motives.

Practical implications

By definition cultural dimensions capture variations in consumers' motives. Because of exposed limitations, the study did not provide full evidence for the conceptual proposal (that healthy food motivation is determined by cultural dimensions). Nevertheless, the conceptual model could serve managers as an initial indicator in predicting motives for healthy food consumption.

Originality/value

This research proposes a relationship between cultural dimensions and consumer motivation, which is an under researched field.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

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Article

Joan Richardson

Hospitals in the United Kingdom have come in for a fair degree of criticism of late. Certainly the environments they provide would not seem to merit the much‐vaunted…

Abstract

Hospitals in the United Kingdom have come in for a fair degree of criticism of late. Certainly the environments they provide would not seem to merit the much‐vaunted description of them as ‘centres of excellence’. It has been suggested that hospitals actually create ill health. There is concern about their kitchens and food hygiene; staff, patients and relatives alike are on edge about the insidious spread of legionella; there is ever‐present worry about accidents, especially fire, and about conditions which are conducive to insensitive handling of elderly patients — all creating a disturbing picture, which hardly conjures up an image of surroundings that promote health.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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