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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2019

Mingliang Feng

To improve the quality of life, human-oriented smart city planning and management based on time-space behavior was studied. First, the basic theory of time-space behavior…

Abstract

To improve the quality of life, human-oriented smart city planning and management based on time-space behavior was studied. First, the basic theory of time-space behavior and smart city was introduced. The relationship between public participation and smart city construction planning was analyzed, and the positive and negative significance of public participation in smart city construction planning was expounded. Then, the mechanism for public participation in smart city construction planning was proposed. Finally, public participation in smart city construction planning was analyzed from the perspectives of power balance, interest coordination and safeguard measures. The results showed that public participation in smart city construction planning was an important manifestation of the realization of public democratic rights. The scientific nature and feasibility of smart city construction planning was enhanced. The smooth implementation of smart city construction planning was an important foundation for promoting smart city construction. Therefore, public participation is an important way to safeguard social public interests and build a harmonious society.

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Open House International, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Antoine Clarinval, Anthony Simonofski, Benoît Vanderose and Bruno Dumas

The purpose of this research is to study how current research reports reflect on using public displays in the smart city. In particular, it looks at the state-of-the-art…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to study how current research reports reflect on using public displays in the smart city. In particular, it looks at the state-of-the-art of this domain from two angles. On the one hand, it investigates the participation of citizens in the development of public displays. On the other hand, it aims at understanding how public displays may foster citizen participation in addressing urban issues. Its goal is to provide a literature review of this field, and a research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review (SLR) was conducted following a thoroughly detailed protocol. It surveys 34 recent papers through multiple aspects, including interaction modality, level of participation, socio-demographics of participating citizens, topic of participation, evaluation of the display and participation of end-users in the early development stages of the display. Then, a research agenda informed by the results of the SLR is discussed in light of related literature.

Findings

The SLR showed that further research is needed to improve the involvement of citizens in the early stages of the development of public displays, broaden the spectrum of citizen participation achieved through public displays, integrate public displays with other means of participation and handle the changing urban context to improve the participation experience.

Originality/value

Previous literature reviews have been conducted in the field of public displays, including one specifically related to citizen participation. However, they have emphasized the technological aspects of public displays and omitted other essential aspects. This article aims at addressing this gap by conducting a literature review, including also non-technological perspectives such as socio-demographics and participation in development, complementing other works.

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Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Robert Mark Silverman

This article aims to examine the mechanisms used by municipalities to stimulate public participation and, in part, to argue that contrasts between the socio‐economic…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to examine the mechanisms used by municipalities to stimulate public participation and, in part, to argue that contrasts between the socio‐economic make‐up of central cities in the USA and Canada explain these divergent techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on a survey of planning departments measuring the types of public participation strategies used by local governments.

Findings

The article's findings indicate that Canadian municipalities adopt a broader range of public participation techniques related to: voluntarism and public engagement, neighborhood and strategic planning, and e‐government. In contrast, the article's findings indicate that US municipalities are more likely to promote public participation through mechanisms such as annual community meetings and referendums on public issues.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusion of the article offers recommendations for expanding the scope of public participation and developing strategies that maximize citizen input in community development activities in both countries.

Practical implications

The survey was conducted to identify the scope of public participation techniques used by local governments in the Niagara region. One limitation of this methodology is that it does not gauge the effectiveness of the participation techniques used by local governments or the intensity of public engagement. However, the results from this study provide future researchers with a mechanism for focusing future analysis.

Originality/value

The findings can assist in identifying new directions for enhancing public participation in the USA and Canada.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 26 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

David James Hunter, Katharina Kieslich, Peter Littlejohns, Sophie Staniszewska, Emma Tumilty, Albert Weale and Iestyn Williams

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the findings of this special issue and discusses the future challenges for policy, research and society. The findings suggest…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the findings of this special issue and discusses the future challenges for policy, research and society. The findings suggest that challenges emerge as a result of legitimacy deficits of both consensus and contestatory modes of public involvement in health priority setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the discussions and findings presented in this special issue. It seeks to bring the country experiences and case studies together to draw conclusions for policy, research and society.

Findings

At least two recurring themes emerge. An underlying theme is the importance, but also the challenge, of establishing legitimacy in health priority setting. The country experiences suggest that we understand very little about the conditions under which representative, or authentic, participation generates legitimacy and under which it will be regarded as insufficient. A second observation is that public participation takes a variety of forms that depend on the opportunity structures in a given national context. Given this variety the conceptualization of public participation needs to be expanded to account for the many forms of public participation.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that the challenges of public involvement are closely linked to the question of how legitimate processes and decisions can be generated in priority setting. This suggests that future research must focus more narrowly on conditions under which legitimacy are generated in order to expand the understanding of public involvement in health prioritization.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Jean Slutsky, Emma Tumilty, Catherine Max, Lanting Lu, Sripen Tantivess, Renata Curi Hauegen, Jennifer A Whitty, Albert Weale, Steven D Pearson, Aviva Tugendhaft, Hufeng Wang, Sophie Staniszewska, Krisantha Weerasuriya, Jeonghoon Ahn and Leonardo Cubillos

The paper summarizes data from 12 countries, chosen to exhibit wide variation, on the role and place of public participation in the setting of priorities. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper summarizes data from 12 countries, chosen to exhibit wide variation, on the role and place of public participation in the setting of priorities. The purpose of this paper is to exhibit cross-national patterns in respect of public participation, linking those differences to institutional features of the countries concerned.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is an example of case-orientated qualitative assessment of participation practices. It derives its data from the presentation of country case studies by experts on each system. The country cases are located within the historical development of democracy in each country.

Findings

Patterns of participation are widely variable. Participation that is effective through routinized institutional processes appears to be inversely related to contestatory participation that uses political mobilization to challenge the legitimacy of the priority setting process. No system has resolved the conceptual ambiguities that are implicit in the idea of public participation.

Originality/value

The paper draws on a unique collection of country case studies in participatory practice in prioritization, supplementing existing published sources. In showing that contestatory participation plays an important role in a sub-set of these countries it makes an important contribution to the field because it broadens the debate about public participation in priority setting beyond the use of minipublics and the observation of public representatives on decision-making bodies.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Flavio Saab, Paulo Henrique de Souza Bermejo, Gustavo Cunha Garcia, Jonathan Soares Pereira and Suylan de Almeida Midlej e Silva

Social participation or public participation is a mechanism that aims to enable decision makers to understand the real needs of society and to promote more appropriate and…

Abstract

Purpose

Social participation or public participation is a mechanism that aims to enable decision makers to understand the real needs of society and to promote more appropriate and acceptable public policies. The purpose of this paper is to analyze, through Douglasian Cultural Theory, the public-consultation mechanism, and to what extent it encourages the participation of people with different points of view in the formulation of public policies.

Design/methodology/approach

This research paper uses theoretical propositions from Douglasian Cultural Theory to investigate the process of public consultation adopted by the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (Anvisa) in the formulation of public policies for Brazil’s health sector.

Findings

The results contribute to the findings of previous studies, i.e., that social participation is unequal, and that some points of view are dominant in policy formulation. This indicates that public managers should seek mechanisms of participation that promote more inclusive and pluralistic public participation.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of this study are the subjectivity inherent in the classification of “voices” in Douglasian Cultural Theory, the small number of contributions analyzed and the absence of some unpublished data.

Originality/value

The analysis contributes to the literature by supporting some and rejecting other propositions of Douglasian Cultural Theory, as well as indicating possible potential from this theory through public administration in the evaluation of mechanisms of social participation.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Lin-lin Xie, Yu Yang, Yi Hu and Albert P.C. Chan

Public participation has been implemented with growing frequency as an instrument for dealing with the increased socio-economic and environmental disputes in public

Abstract

Purpose

Public participation has been implemented with growing frequency as an instrument for dealing with the increased socio-economic and environmental disputes in public infrastructure and construction (PIC) projects in China. The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of major stakeholders on the major aspects related to public participation practices in China's PIC projects and intends to convey what is presently happening in this segment of the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Specific topics of the social effects, benefits, forms, and barriers were addressed through a recent survey of the major stakeholders involved in PIC projects. The survey results were used to perform a strength-weakness-opportunity-threat analysis for evaluating the status quo of public participation in PIC projects.

Findings

The survey results indicate that the development of public participation practices in China remains relatively slow despite the urgent need to promote this mechanism for solving socio-economic and environmental disputes in PIC projects. Thus, a four-step strategic plan is suggested to be established to overcome main barriers for the implementation of public participation and promote its development in China.

Originality/value

This study aims to evaluate the status quo of the public participation practices in China by conducting a national survey, which has never been conducted before. The findings of this paper provide a holistic view of the status quo of public participation in China's PIC projects and promote a better application of this mechanism in the construction industry.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Carol Ebdon, Yue Jiang and Aimee L. Franklin

Issues like fiscal crises and sequestration may cause elected officials to get citizen input in the budget process. This action can be viewed as a reactive strategy used…

Abstract

Issues like fiscal crises and sequestration may cause elected officials to get citizen input in the budget process. This action can be viewed as a reactive strategy used when the relationship with citizens is weakening; or, a proactive strategy to keep governance relationships strong. This conundrum prompts examination of how budgetary participation mechanisms serve representative democracy and governance goals. Using survey results from public officials in 391 midwestern cities regarding perceptions of governance relationships and the use of participation mechanisms, we find no significant relationships and weak explanatory power in the causal model. When trust in government keeps falling, the relative strength of the relationship between public officials and citizens is an issue that public administrators must understand to develop effective budget participation mechanisms.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Albert Weale, Katharina Kieslich, Peter Littlejohns, Aviva Tugendhaft, Emma Tumilty, Krisantha Weerasuriya and Jennifer A Whitty

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue on improving equitable access to health care through increased public and patient involvement (PPI) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the special issue on improving equitable access to health care through increased public and patient involvement (PPI) in prioritization decisions by discussing the conceptualization, scope and rationales of PPI in priority setting that inform the special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a mixed-methods approach in that it provides a literature review and a conceptual discussion of the common themes emerging in the field of PPI and health priority setting.

Findings

The special issue focuses on public participation that is collective in character, in the sense that the participation relates to a social, not personal, decision and is relevant to whole groups of people and not single individuals. It is aimed at influencing a decision on public policy or legal rules. The rationales for public participation can be found in democratic theory, especially as they relate to the social and political values of legitimacy and representation.

Originality/value

The paper builds on previous definitions of public participation by underlining its collective character. In doing so, it develops the work by Parry, Moyser and Day by arguing that, in light of the empirical evidence presented in this issue, public participatory activities such as protests and demonstrations should no longer be labelled unconventional, but should instead be labelled as “contestatory participation”. This is to better reflect a situation in which these modes of participation have become more conventional in many parts of the world.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

Tritsana Sorat, Nug-Rob Rawangkarn, Wee Rawang and Kanang Kantamaturapoj

This study aims to evaluate the meaningful public participation in activities relating to the master plan development and, at the same time, propose some recommendations…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the meaningful public participation in activities relating to the master plan development and, at the same time, propose some recommendations for improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out with in-depth interviews of 35 key-informants selected from various stakeholder groups involving in public participation activities. The evaluation frameworks for meaningful participation were developed from various scholars.

Findings

The evaluation showed that the public hearings partially met the criteria of information provision and representativeness. However, there are rooms for improvement on participation in decision-making process, social learning and influence over policy decision-making. Therefore, this study proposes two recommendations. First, more flexible form of public participation is needed to enable discussions among various groups of stakeholders. Second, the organizer should communicate with stakeholders about how their opinions influence the final master plan in order to create sense of belonging among community members.

Originality/value

This research developed the evaluation framework for public participation in old town conservation master plan in developing country.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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