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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Ohood Al Roomi and Mohamed Ibrahim

This paper addresses the effects of a set of variables on sales performance of home‐based business in Dubai. The variables includes owner’s gender, private sources of…

Abstract

This paper addresses the effects of a set of variables on sales performance of home‐based business in Dubai. The variables includes owner’s gender, private sources of funds, external sources of funds, usage of technology, business expenses, number of weekly hours an owner works, outsourcing or sub‐contracting, age of business, and number of the family members assisting the owner in running the business. The results showed significant positive effects for the average weekly hours an owner devotes to the business and mild effects for the use of technology. However, the remaining variables did not show any significant relationship with homebased business performance. Of particular importance is the lack of significant effects for gender. This indicates that business performance is not tied up to gender. Both men and women could do equally well in the field of home‐based business.

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Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Elizabeth Walker, Calvin Wang and Janice Redmond

This paper seeks to explore self‐employment through home‐based business ownership as a potential solution to the inter‐role conflict experienced by women attempting to…

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5829

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore self‐employment through home‐based business ownership as a potential solution to the inter‐role conflict experienced by women attempting to balance dual work and family roles.

Design/methodology/approach

Home‐based businesses (n = 626) were surveyed in Western Australia as part of a larger national study. Data were collected on operator and business characteristics, and specific home‐based business issues (e.g. reasons for preferring a home‐base, management and planning, growth facilitators and barriers). Four‐way comparisons investigating the dynamics of home‐based business ownership between male and female operators and operators with and without dependants were made.

Findings

The attraction of home‐based business ownership is driven predominantly by the flexibility afforded to lifestyle and the ability to balance work and family. While these advantages were more salient for women than for men, gender per se was not a determining factor in why operators started a home‐based business. The more significant determining factor was the issue of dependants.

Practical implications

Self‐employment, particularly through home‐based business ownership, may well solve some women's necessity to balance work and family. However, it may not be a viable solution for all women, particularly those seeking high financial and career rewards.

Originality/value

This paper contributes empirical findings regarding home‐based businesses which, as a distinct form of small business and self‐employment alternative, still remain very much under‐researched. The paper also addresses the issue of home‐based businesses being emancipatory vehicles for women juggling to manage work and family, and provides findings which question this increasingly populist notion.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Haya Al-Dajani and Susan Marlow

The purpose of this paper is to develop an empirically informed conceptual framework to analyse the gendered relationship between empowerment and entrepreneurship…

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5709

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an empirically informed conceptual framework to analyse the gendered relationship between empowerment and entrepreneurship contextualised within the lives of displaced Palestinian migrant women operating home-based enterprises in Amman, Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal qualitative study was undertaken during which semi-structured in-depth interviews were regularly conducted with 43 women producing high-quality traditional embroidered goods within home-based enterprises. The empirical material was utilised to inform and illustrate the creation of an empowerment framework.

Findings

Entrepreneurship is popularly presented as an individually focused economic undertaking. However, this paper demonstrates it is also a socio-politically situated activity; within this particular context, marginalised subordinated women were empowered through their home-based enterprises.

Originality/value

This paper offers a gender informed conceptual framework to inform the analyses of empowerment and entrepreneurship. The discussion describes the necessary processes for development goals to be realised, and explains how traditionally subordinated women can utilise enterprise to contribute to social change. In so doing, the proposed conceptual framework acts as a theoretical illustration of the gendered relationship between empowerment and entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Lee Pugalis, Bob Giddings and Kelechi Anyigor

Across the global community the eradication of slums has been identified as a key project as part of the broader goal to eradicate poverty. Entrepreneurial efforts are…

Abstract

Purpose

Across the global community the eradication of slums has been identified as a key project as part of the broader goal to eradicate poverty. Entrepreneurial efforts are viewed as a key means of ‘lifting’ people from poverty. Through a focus on Nigeria, this chapter examines slum upgrading programmes. The primary aim is to identify the opportunities and barriers facing inhabitants of informal settlements to realising entrepreneurial synergies that can occur in particular places.

Methodology/approach

A case study examination of the Kpirikpiri informal settlement in Ebonyi State, Nigeria was conducted that utilised a mixed-method approach. The research passed through three key phases. The first phase comprised a literature survey and review. The second phase involved a household survey to gather some baseline socio-economic and physical data that helped to fill the void of basic data. A total of 142 respondents participated in the survey, representing 10% of the total number of households in the area. The third phase involved the collection of qualitative data through focus group discussions and individual interviews.

Findings

Slum dwellers have skills and formal education equivalent to those in the Global North. Nevertheless, Nigerians tend to view entrepreneurial activities as secondary to other forms of employment, especially positions in the public sector. Paradoxically, slum dwellers place little trust in state authorities. Security of tenure is a major barrier to expanding entrepreneurial activities, as many landlords are reluctant to permit tenants to operate home-based enterprises, which is often a neglected element of place-based development strategies.

Research and practical implications

The chapter demonstrates the need for basic socio-economic datasets alongside user perspectives to shape the efficacy of development initiatives. In the case of Kpirikpiri, slum improvement programmes may have benefited from parallel educational programmes that expound the virtues of entrepreneurialism and concomitant training schemes, improved governance open to local social networks, less emphasis on physical upgrading of some forms of infrastructure and greater attention towards improving security of tenure as a path towards generating more home-based enterprises.

Originality/value of paper

The entrepreneurial potential of the inhabitants of informal settlements is under-acknowledged in ‘upgrading’ interventions and also underplayed in the research literature. The chapter draws some much needed critical attention to the opportunities and barriers facing inhabitants of informal settlements, which helps to challenge some dominant transnational policy assumptions.

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Enterprising Places: Leadership and Governance Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-641-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Kapil Deo Prasad, Sanjay Kumar Jha and Anand Prakash

This paper examines the ways in which the concepts of “quality”, “productivity” and “business performance” are dealt in the literature to exhibit that terms used within…

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4141

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the ways in which the concepts of “quality”, “productivity” and “business performance” are dealt in the literature to exhibit that terms used within these fields are vaguely defined and poorly understood. The purpose of this paper is to define quality, productivity and business performance along with their linkages for home-based brassware manufacturing units.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews related academic literature mostly since past ten years.

Findings

This paper clarifies meaning and linkages of quality, productivity and business performance in home-based brassware manufacturing units.

Research limitations/implications

The meaning and interpretations of quality, productivity and business performance may differ for other manufacturing units.

Practical implications

This paper highlights determinants of quality, productivity and business performance using key performance areas as applied explicitly for home-based brassware manufacturing units. The systems approach has been applied to understand productivity.

Originality/value

This paper creates terminologies that reduce the existing confusion with the field for applications in academia and brassware industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 64 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Content available
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246

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Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Sylvia Chant

The purpose of this paper is to explore links between a revisionist view of the “feminisation of poverty” in developing countries and women’s work and home-based enterprise

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1436

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore links between a revisionist view of the “feminisation of poverty” in developing countries and women’s work and home-based enterprise in urban slums.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper’s discussion of the “feminisation of poverty” draws substantially from ethnographic field research conducted in The Gambia, The Philippines and Costa Rica. This research led the author to propose the notion of a “feminisation of responsibility and/or obligation”. The latter approach draws attention to issues such as gendered disparities of labour, time and resource inputs into household livelihoods, which are often most marked in male-headed units, and are not captured in conventional referents of the “feminisation of poverty”, which are rather narrowly confined to incomes and female household headship.

Findings

An integral element of the author’s critique is that the main policy response to classic “feminisation of poverty” thinking, to date, has been to “feminise” anti-poverty initiatives such as Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) and microfinance programmes.

Originality/value

The paper argues that the “feminisation of poverty” compounds the tensions women already face in terms of managing unpaid reproductive and/or “volunteer” work with their economic contributions to household livelihoods, and it is in the context of urban slums, where housing, service and infrastructure deficiencies pose considerable challenges to women’s dual burdens of productive and reproductive labour. The paper emphasizes that to more effectively address gender inequality while also alleviating poverty, policy interventions sensitive to women’s multiple, time-consuming responsibilities and obligations are paramount.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Peter Kellett and Wendy Bishop

Traditional environments consist not only of physical buildings and spaces but also the people and their activities which take place within them. This paper examines some…

Abstract

Traditional environments consist not only of physical buildings and spaces but also the people and their activities which take place within them. This paper examines some aspects of the interrelationship between people and places. Traditional social values are believed to be undermined by the harsh imperatives of survival in the expanding urban areas of the developing world. The collaborative nature of many rural societies can be contrasted with the hard, individualistic and competitive character of life in developing cities. Unregulated, urban, economic processes in particular are assumed to be antagonistic towards gemeinschaft ideals because the logic of the market has little respect for non-monetary values.

However one of the key characteristics of many informal economies is the ability of participants to draw creatively and flexibly on all potential resources: human, material and spatial. This is particularly evident in households and settlements where a significant proportion of the economic activity is within micro scale, home-based enterprises (HBEs). By blurring and re-configuring the spatial and conceptual boundaries between work and home, between production and reproduction, many households are able to generate income to sustain themselves. Intrinsic to these processes are the linkages and exchanges between neighbours and residents, many of which are based on cultural and religious value systems which can be supportive of the economic activities taking place.

This paper will explore aspects of the interrelationship between economic and social processes through the use of empirical data collected during periods of participant observation in a consolidated informal urban settlement (kampung) in the city of Surabaya, Indonesia. Detailed household case studies will be used to illustrate how income generation activities are embedded within social networks and how in many cases traditional collaborative cultural values directly reinforce economic production. This is echoed in the use of space, particularly the overlapping and shared use of streets and alleyways. The paper concludes that despite severe economic constraints many traditional values facilitate survival in times of crisis and can be conducive to longer term sustainability.

Details

Open House International, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Leighton Jay and Michael Schaper

Despite the growth of many new business advice and support services over the last 15 years, the extent to which such facilities are used by the Australian small business…

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1591

Abstract

Despite the growth of many new business advice and support services over the last 15 years, the extent to which such facilities are used by the Australian small business sector has not been extensively examined, especially amongst the micro‐enterprises that comprise the majority of all small firms. Home based businesses (HBBs) constitute the largest group of micro‐businesses in Australia, as well as comprising the biggest single SME sector in the nation. An investigation into the usage of advisory services by HBBs in Perth, Western Australia revealed substantial differences in the types and frequency of advisers used. It was found that accountants, banks, other business operators and family/friends were the most commonly consulted services. In contrast, lawyers, government agencies, industry associations, and management consultants were only infrequently used. The research project also attempted to determine if the frequency of adviser usage could be predicted on the basis of a range of individual and firm characteristics (namely, the age of the business, the size of the enterprise, and the age and gender of the owner/operator). A positive correlation was found to exist with all four factors, with micro‐firms managed by men tending to use advisory services more frequently.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Philippe Gugler

A significant stream of literature focuses on host countries’ locations when explaining why firms internalize some of their activities in specific countries. At first…

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1261

Abstract

Purpose

A significant stream of literature focuses on host countries’ locations when explaining why firms internalize some of their activities in specific countries. At first glance, home location schemes and specificities seem to have attracted less attention in the scientific community. The purpose of this contribution is to provide a literature review linked to the specific issue of emerging countries’ country-specific advantages and the competitiveness of emerging market multinational enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is to present the main theoretical developments related to the role of home countries in the internationalization process of domestic firms in general and as far as the home context of emerging countries is concerned.

Findings

A rigorous analysis of the literature shows that theoretical developments and empirical studies on international business do refer explicitly or at least implicitly to the role of home countries in the international expansion of firms.

Originality/value

The value of this review is to develop the main streams of the literature and to serve as a basis for the other contributions published in this area.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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