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Article

Peter U.C. Dieke

Provides a policy basis for increasing tourism employmentadvantages for The Gambia. Emphasizes the need for co‐operation betweenthe Government of The Gambia and overseas…

Abstract

Provides a policy basis for increasing tourism employment advantages for The Gambia. Emphasizes the need for co‐operation between the Government of The Gambia and overseas private tourism entrepreneurs in the context of training programmes. The Government needs to provide the right atmosphere for development action, and foreign investors need to put at the disposal of The Gambia their extensive market connections, established reputations, and recognized expertise, to ensure that training does take place.

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Employee Relations, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part

Kabba E. Colley

This chapter focuses on a study, which investigates the question: How do teacher education policies match teacher education practices in Anglophone West Africa? Teacher…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on a study, which investigates the question: How do teacher education policies match teacher education practices in Anglophone West Africa? Teacher education policy in this chapter refers to action statements in verbal or written form made by national education authorities/agencies about teacher education, while teacher education practice refers to the work that teachers do. Using the method of research synthesis, multi-layered, purposeful sampling of various data sources, Boolean and non-Boolean search strategies, qualitative and quantitative analytical procedures, the study identified over a hundred documents. Out of these, 77 documents met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The distribution of research outcomes by Anglophone West African countries were as follows: 18.2% were on Gambia, 27.3% were on Ghana, 10.4% were on Liberia, 24.7% were on Nigeria, and 19.5% were on Sierra Leone. From this research synthesis, it is evident that there is a gap between teacher education policy and practice in Anglophone West Africa. Most teacher education policies are “add-on,” meaning that they were formulated as part of a larger national policy framework on basic, secondary and tertiary education. In addition, the research synthesis found that Gambia, Ghana, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone are very similar in terms of their pre-service teacher training models, but differ in their in-service and professional development systems, while Liberia has a slightly different in-service model with varying durations. The limitations and implications of the findings for further comparative and international education research are discussed in the chapter.

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Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

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Article

Abdoulie Sallah and Colin C. Williams

This paper aims to evaluate critically the meta‐narrative that there is no alternative to capitalism. Building upon an emerging body of post‐structuralist thought that has

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate critically the meta‐narrative that there is no alternative to capitalism. Building upon an emerging body of post‐structuralist thought that has begun deconstructing this discourse in relation to western economies and post‐Soviet societies, this paper further extends this critique to Sub‐Saharan Africa by investigating the degree to which people in the Gambia rely on the capitalist market economy for their livelihood. Reporting the results of 80 household face‐to‐face interviews (involving over 500 people), the finding is that only a small minority of households in contemporary Gambian society rely on the formal market economy alone to secure their livelihood and that the vast majority depend on a plurality of market and non‐market economic practices. The outcome is a call to re‐think the lived practices of economic transition in Sub‐Saharan Africa in general and the Gambia in particular, so as to open up the feasibility of, and possibilities for, alternative economic futures beyond capitalist hegemony.

Design/methodology/approach

Some 80 households (involving over 500 people) were interviewed face‐to‐face on their livelihood coping strategies.

Findings

Reporting the results of 80 household face‐to‐face interviews (involving over 500 people), the finding is that only a small minority of households in contemporary Gambian society rely on the formal market economy alone to secure their livelihood and that the vast majority depend on a plurality of market and non‐market economic practices.

Practical implications

The outcome is a call to re‐think the lived practices of economic transition in Sub‐Saharan Africa in general and the Gambia in particular, so as to open up the feasibility of, and possibilities for, alternative economic futures beyond capitalist hegemony.

Originality/value

This research gives us an empirical understanding of the implications of lived experiences of people's day‐to‐day livelihood coping strategies, which refutes the capitalist's thesis and calls of a re‐think on economic and sustainable development policies and strategies in Sub‐Saharan Africa

Details

Foresight, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article

Olajumoke Olaosebikan and Mike Adams

The purpose of this study was to, using a case study research design informed by organizational economics theory, to examine the prospects for micro-insurance in promoting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to, using a case study research design informed by organizational economics theory, to examine the prospects for micro-insurance in promoting micro-credit in a low-income Anglophone country in sub-Saharan Africa – The Gambia. Two main research questions are addressed: first, what is the most appropriate micro-finance institution (MFI) organizational structure to maximize the economic benefits of micro-insurance? Second, what are the financial management and wider economic benefits of the use of micro-insurance by MFIs?

Design/methodology/approach

To address our two research questions, we used a semi-structured interview protocol, informed by the organizational economics literature, to interpret the data collected from our field cases. We believe that these intrinsic qualities of case study methodology are particularly apt in the present study, given the complex and emergent nature of micro-finance and micro-insurance in low-income countries such The Gambia. By focusing on case studies in a single country, we also to some extent help control for variations in business environment that could confound interpretations of field data obtained from different jurisdictions.

Findings

The results of our study suggest that the mutual (cooperative) structure of credit unions is likely to be the most cost-efficient and effective organizational form for reducing information asymmetries, agency problems and transaction costs. We also observe that micro-insurance can help reduce the risk of loan defaults, thereby increasing returns on savings and lowering the costs of debt. As such, micro-insurance stimulates the demand–supply of financial intermediation in less developed countries and so helps promote economic development. In addition to contributing new insights, our findings have potentially important commercial and public policy implications.

Research limitations/implications

We acknowledge that our research is subject to inherent limitations such as the focus on three interviews in three different types of MFI organization while excluding other structural forms of organization such as government-owned/sponsored organizations. Nonetheless, the organizational characteristics of the cases examined in the present study are representative of most MFIs in developing countries. Given the prevalent hierarchical nature of corporate systems in sub-Saharan Africa, the views of the interviewees are also deemed to reflect those of other board members. Nonetheless, we acknowledge that the conclusions from our research may need to be tempered in line with these inherent limitations with the research approach adopted.

Practical implications

The insights obtained from our Gambia-based research could be generalized to developing countries elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, and indeed, other parts of the developing world. Consequently, the study could be of interest and relevance to international financiers (e.g. the World Bank), aid agencies, governments and other development organizations.

Originality/value

Despite its evident business and development potential, academic management research on micro-insurance, and in particular, its role in supporting micro-finance initiatives, is still very much at an embryonic stage. Our study thus seeks to fill this knowledge gap.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Expert briefing

The dismissals follow growing public criticism of the lack of urgency and policy direction of the new administration and came on the same day Barrow concluded a three-day…

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Expert briefing

For over a month, Jammeh rebuffed diplomatic efforts by the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) to accept Adama Barrow's victory in the December 1…

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB217449

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Expert briefing

Barrow, elected in 2016 as an independent backed by an opposition coalition, has sought to build a political base and prolong his stay in power. His decision to seek…

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Article

Thomas Hamilton Forster and V. Suchitra Mouly

The purpose of this paper is to study the privatisation process and its impact on organisational change in the electricity industry in the Gambia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the privatisation process and its impact on organisational change in the electricity industry in the Gambia.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was used for the study as qualitative techniques make use of a holistic approach, which allows for the assembling of a comprehensive and complete picture of the process under investigation.

Findings

The findings from the research suggest that change processes that are endogenous are more likely to achieve their desired objectives when compared to exogenous changes.

Research limitations/implications

The study suggests that there is a relationship between the locus of change and the level of trust associated with the drivers of change. Future research on privatisation could make a significant contribution if focussed on the social processes of privatisation.

Practical implications

The study shows that privatisation will only occur if all interests become associated with a reformative pattern of value commitment. A normative vision made up of ideas, beliefs, and values that shape prevailing conceptions must be present to support the process.

Originality/value

Research has shown that most changes carried out in less developed countries (LDCs) under the auspices of the WB/IMF, have not achieved the desired outcomes. This study has shown that the initiation and control of reform from outside affects the outcomes of the change programme. It is therefore imperative for funding agencies to concentrate on providing assistance to enable LDCs design control and implement their own changes rather than the funding agencies taking control of this aspect of reform.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Expert briefing

If Barrow is inaugurated, it will mark the first peaceful transfer of power since the country gained independence. Incumbent Yahya Jammeh, who seized power in a 1994…

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Executive summary

GAMBIA: Opposition triumph as incumbent concedes

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES216418

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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