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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Marco Tieman

The paper aims to describe the basic requirements of Halal food supply chains in order to ensure the integrity of Halal food at the point of consumption, which is an…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe the basic requirements of Halal food supply chains in order to ensure the integrity of Halal food at the point of consumption, which is an obligation for Muslims.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research paper is based on in‐depth interviews to better understand what is Halal, the Islamic sources that are essential for Halal supply chains, and identify the guidelines and principles which are essential for the integrity of Halal supply chains.

Findings

Halal supply chain management is based on avoiding direct contact with Haram, addressing the risk of contamination and ensuring that it is in line with the perception of the Muslim consumer. In particular, the product and market characteristics are important variables in the supply chain management of Halal supply chains. Further empirical research is needed to measure the perception of the Muslim consumer. A better understanding is also required into the principles in organising the Halal supply chain for different markets (Muslim and non‐Muslim countries). There is a need for a Halal supply chain model that is able to describe and optimise Halal supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

Since this paper is an exploratory study, it provides some insights into the considerations in organising Halal supply chains. However, further qualitative and quantitative research is needed in order to provide the industry with concrete tools to design effective Halal supply chains.

Practical implications

In response to the logistics industry that started with Halal logistics solutions, the Halal certified food industries needs to know whether and how to start with a Halal supply chain approach. This paper presented key considerations to address in organising effective Halal supply chains.

Social implications

Halal in non‐Muslim countries is not very well understood, where in logistics only the aspect of avoiding of contact with Haram is addressed mainly through packaging. This article presents a better understanding of Halal and the application of Halal in supply chain management.

Originality/value

There is a lack of academic research in Halal logistics and supply chain management. This exploratory research provides some basic fundamentals on the supply chain management of Halal products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 2 December 2022

Shahbaz Khan, Abid Haleem and Mohd Imran Khan

Halal integrity assurance is the primary objective of Halal supply chain management. Several halal-related risks are present that have the potential to breach halal

Abstract

Purpose

Halal integrity assurance is the primary objective of Halal supply chain management. Several halal-related risks are present that have the potential to breach halal integrity. Therefore, this study aims to develop the framework for the assessment of halal-related risk from a supply chain perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Risk related to halal is identified through the combined approach of the systematic literature review and experts’ input. Further, these risks are assessed using the integrated approach of intuitionistic fuzzy number (IFN) and D-number based on their severity score. This integrated approach can handle fuzziness, inconsistency and incomplete information that are present in the expert’s input.

Findings

Eighteen significant risks related to halal are identified and grouped into four categories. These risks are further prioritised based on their severity score and classified as “high priority risk” or “low priority risks”. The findings of the study suggests that raw material status, processing methods, the wholesomeness of raw materials and common facilities for halal and non-halal products are more severe risks.

Research limitations/implications

This study only focusses on halal-related risks and does not capture the other types of risks occurring in the supply chain. Risks related to halal supply chain management are not considered in this study. Prioritisation of the risks is based on the expert’s input which can be biased to the experts' background.

Practical implications

The proposed risk assessment framework is beneficial for risk managers to assess the halal related risks and develop their mitigation strategies accordingly. Furthermore, the prioritisation of the risks also assists managers in the optimal utilisation of resources to mitigate high-priority risks.

Originality/value

This study provides significant risks related to halal integrity, therefore helping in a better understanding of the halal supply chain. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study for developing a risk assessment model for the halal supply chain.

Details

Arab Gulf Journal of Scientific Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-9899

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2022

Mohamad El Daouk

This paper is aimed at introducing ḥalāl supply chain management (SCM) to the British construction sector, construction supply chains and “SCM”. Ḥalāl supply chains can…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is aimed at introducing ḥalāl supply chain management (SCM) to the British construction sector, construction supply chains and “SCM”. Ḥalāl supply chains can optimise British construction supply chains by promoting meticulous, qualitative and mutually reinforcing systems. The British construction sector has failed to overcome the inimical, inefficient, fractured and transactional attitudes (collectively, the “complexities”) pervading it and the supply chains beneath it. Construction SCM has been able to introduce change, but with limited profound effect. This is owed to its lack of human agency, proactive quality control systems, as well as other verification and assurance mechanisms. Introducing the Sharīʿa principles encapsulating ḥalāl food supply chains can offer the input needed to optimise current construction supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts an integrative general review of the academic literature pertaining to the British construction sector, construction SCM, ḥalāl food supply chains, ḥalāl assurance and control processes. The extensive literature review is crucial because it will enable introducing “ḥalāl” to construction SCM, hence ḥalāl construction supply chain management (“ḤCSCM”). ḤCSCM will then be applied to one of the most recent British construction SCM systems to identify how ḤCSCM can complement existing systems.

Findings

The findings indicate that ḤCSCM can further alleviate the complexities thwarting the British construction sector on a supply chain level. This is attributed to taʿrīf’s tailored identification and traceability processes, iltizām’s cross-lateral monitoring processes and istiqāmah’s Sharīʿa-compliant, assured and verifiable certification system, all of which complement the existing construction supply chain assurance and control processes in the UK.

Originality/value

The conception of ḤCSCM promotes an untapped area in the academic literature. Academicians and practitioners can transplant ḥalāl principles from the ḥalāl food manufacturing sector into the British construction sector – similar to how construction SCM was founded by principles originating from the manufacturing industry. This paper highlights the shortfalls of construction SCM in British construction supply chains and propounds how ḤCSCM can resolve them.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2022

Ratih Hendayani and Yudi Fernando

This study aims to investigate the relationship between blockchain technology adoption and firm competitiveness through Halal supply chain performance as a mediating variable.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between blockchain technology adoption and firm competitiveness through Halal supply chain performance as a mediating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper has used the explanatory approach and multivariate data analysis using partial least squares with structural equation modelling. The data were collected from 178 Indonesian manufacturing firms producing Halal-certified foods and beverages.

Findings

The findings reveal that adopting blockchain technology positively and significantly affects Halal supply chain performance and firm competitiveness. The total indirect effect shows that the availability of blockchain technology indirectly affects the firm’s competitiveness through Halal supply chain performance.

Originality/value

This study has provided a novel theoretical framework showing that adopting blockchain technology can improve the Halal supply chain performance and the firm’s competitiveness. The transparency and integrity features of blockchain technology have strengthened the consumers’ confidence in the reliability of the Halal-certified food and beverage products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Yudi Fernando, Muhamad Fairuz Ahmad Jasmi, Ika Sari Wahyuni-TD, Fineke Mergeresa, Kamarul Azman Khamis, A. Fakhrorazi and Rusdi Omar

Halal frozen meat product returns are major challenges in the halal frozen meat supply chain because of the sheer volume and processing costs of returns. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal frozen meat product returns are major challenges in the halal frozen meat supply chain because of the sheer volume and processing costs of returns. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of integrated halal supply chain (IHSC) strategies on effective product returns with halal logistics (HL) as an interceding variable.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used the cross-sectional technique to select samples from a population that revolved around the halal food industry in Malaysia. Data collected from halal service providers who handle halal frozen meat product returns provided insightful findings.

Findings

The findings of this paper indicate that the IHSC dimensions, such as interactive fairness, procedural fairness and service coverage, are positively associated with effective product returns. It also shows that HL plays a mediating role between the IHSC and effective product returns.

Practical implications

From a practical viewpoint, this paper suggests that an effective return service system can be designed to emphasise the category of interactive and flexible justice services through refunds or product replacement, depending on customer's demand.

Originality/value

The result of this paper provides insights into how logistics service provider managers effectively and efficiently handle the halal supply chain network when involving product returns.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Dwi Iryaning Handayani, Ilyas Masudin, Abdul Haris and Dian Palupi Restuputri

This paper aims to provide a brief bibliometric review of previous literature reviews in understanding halal suppliers in the food supply chain to achieve halal standards…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a brief bibliometric review of previous literature reviews in understanding halal suppliers in the food supply chain to achieve halal standards from upstream to downstream.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used was a structured literature review sample of during 2008–2020 totalling 142 articles. The authors use the R-package bibliometric and VOSviewer to find out information about journals, articles, authors, citations, keywords and word hierarchy maps.

Findings

The analysis reveals five research clusters: halal supply chain, food supply chain, supply chain integration, halal lifestyle, halal logistics.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on articles that discuss halal suppliers in the food supply chain.

Originality/value

Bibliometric reviews related to suppliers in the halal food supply chain in this study will help explore halal suppliers and be useful for researchers and practitioners in their fields as well as assist supplier management in the halal food supply chain.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Mohd Imran Khan, Abid Haleem and Shahbaz Khan

Halal supply chain management (HSCM) is an emerging research area and is in the early stage of evolution. This study aims to identify 11 critical factors towards effective…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal supply chain management (HSCM) is an emerging research area and is in the early stage of evolution. This study aims to identify 11 critical factors towards effective management of a Halal supply chain (HSC) and provides a framework for the HSCM by evaluating Halal practices' impact on sustainability performance measures empirically.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire-based survey has been carried out to collect data for analysis. The statistical analysis is accomplished by exploiting merits of factor analysis and structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The results imply that out of 11 critical factors, nine factors on effective management of the HSC are statistically significant, and impacts of two critical factors are positive but statistically insignificant. In the structural model, the path coefficient of all success indicators are positive and statistically significant. In terms of the path coefficient of sustainable performance measures of HSC, all three dimensions, economic, environmental and social, are positive and statistically significant.

Research limitations/implications

The research extends Halal and supply chain management's literature by proposing Halal as a standard quality control system, as it focuses on wholesome consumption. Effective management of the HSC is positively related to the firms' sustainable performance, thus helping managers make the organisation sustainable in the long term.

Practical implications

The research extends the literature of Halal and supply chain management by proposing Halal as a standard quality control system, which focuses on wholesome consumption. Effective management of the HSC is positively related to the sustainable performance of the firms, thus helps managers in making the organisation sustainable in the long term.

Originality/value

The result of the study underlines that sustainable performance measures are embedded in HSCM. This research develops a new paradigm in the research of HSCM and sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 71 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Marco Tieman

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a supply chain view of a robust and resilient halal brand. In this conceptual paper, a risk prevention-mitigation-recovery cycle…

1992

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a supply chain view of a robust and resilient halal brand. In this conceptual paper, a risk prevention-mitigation-recovery cycle is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds further on previous work published in the Journal of Islamic Marketing on Islamic branding and halal supply chain management. Hypotheses are developed on the intensity of risk management.

Findings

Integrity of halal products is becoming an increasing concern for governments and industries. Three halal supply chain risk cycles are proposed: (1) risk prevention: risk vulnerability assessment, supply chain (re)design, vertical and horizontal collaboration, monitoring; (2) risk mitigation: investigative audits, cross-functional team, risk mitigation and communication plan, monitoring; and (3) risk recovery: risk recovery and communication plan, resume operations, maintain employee support, review risk mitigation and recovery plans.

Research limitations/implications

This conceptual paper proposes three halal supply chain risk cycles to better organise risk management in halal supply chains. However, more empirical research on halal risk management is needed to validate these risk management cycles.

Practical implications

To better protect halal brands and corporate reputation, there are evident benefits of extending halal assurance towards the supply chain, for which prevention-mitigation-recovery cycles are proposed.

Originality/value

As halal is going through an evolution, towards a halal supply chain and value chain, halal-certified brands need better protection. It is the first study investigating halal risk and reputation management for halal-certified brands.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Marco Tieman, Jack G.A.J. van der Vorst and Maznah Che Ghazali

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new framework to optimise the design of halal food supply chains, called the “Halal Supply Chain Model”. In this research the…

10694

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new framework to optimise the design of halal food supply chains, called the “Halal Supply Chain Model”. In this research the main logistics business processes are defined, which are the determinants for the halal supply chain performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Next to an extensive literature review, a large discussion group and various focus group sessions conducted in Malaysia, The Netherlands and China have been used to identify halal control activities and assurance activities in logistics business processes, with a focus on transportation, warehousing and terminal operations.

Findings

The findings show that product characteristics (bulk versus unitised, ambient versus cool chain) and market requirements (Muslim or non‐Muslim country) determine the supply chain vulnerability to halal contamination, for which halal control activities and assurance activities are put in place to reduce supply chain vulnerability. More empirical research is needed to further refine the Halal Supply Chain Model for different product–market combinations. Second, qualitative research is recommended for halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical supply chains.

Practical implications

This study shows that halal supply chain management is different from conventional supply chain management, which requires a halal policy and specific design parameters for supply chain objectives, logistics control, supply chain network structure, supply chain business processes, supply chain resources and supply chain performance metrics.

Originality/value

The Halal Supply Chain Model can be an important instrument to design and manage halal food supply chains in extending halal integrity from source to point of consumer purchase. As there is an evident lack of academic research in the field of halal supply chain management, it provides an important reference for halal logistics and supply chain management. The large discussion group and focus group sessions resulted in the publication of the International Halal Logistics Standard (IHIAS 0100:2010) by IHI Alliance in 2010.

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Mohd Hafiz Zulfakar, Caroline Chan and Ferry Jie

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of institutional forces in shaping the operations of halal meat supply chain in Australia, one of the world’s largest…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of institutional forces in shaping the operations of halal meat supply chain in Australia, one of the world’s largest producers and exporters of halal meat. This research examines how the halal meat production requirements are fulfilled and maintained throughout the supply chain in a non-Muslim-majority country.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a single-case study approach and uses semi-structured interviews as the primary method of data collection. It considers the perspectives of various stakeholder groups in the Australian halal meat supply chain (AHMSC). In all, 31 participants have participated in this research.

Findings

The findings show that institutional forces, especially which come through coercive forces, do affect and shape the overall operations of the AHMSC in particularly the way the stakeholders act within the supply chain, particularly in their role in ensuring the protection of halal status or halal integrity of the meat.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that the integrity of halal meat supply chain management operations in a non-Muslim-majority environment can be protected with heavy involvement from the relevant authorities, i.e. the federal government agency and the halal certifiers. With the implementation of specific halal meat production policy, i.e. Australian Government Authorised Halal Program, all parties dealing with the halal meat production for export purpose are obliged to fulfil the religious and food safety requirements, thus providing the necessary assurance for halal meat consumers, especially from the Muslim communities.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to provide insights of halal meat supply chain operations in a non-Muslim-majority environment. This paper also took in account various stakeholder groups that were involved directly with halal meat supply chain operations in Australia rather than focusing on a single stakeholder group which gives a better understanding of the whole supply chain operations.

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