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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Mohamed Syazwan Ab Talib and Siti Norida Wahab

Brunei Darussalam, a rentier state, aims to be one of the leading nations in the global halal industry, and logistics play a key role in realising the goal. However, even…

Abstract

Purpose

Brunei Darussalam, a rentier state, aims to be one of the leading nations in the global halal industry, and logistics play a key role in realising the goal. However, even though logistics is a vital aspect of the halal supply chain, little is known about the halal logistics scene in Brunei. Therefore, this paper aims to discuss and uncover the various strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats surrounding the country's halal logistics sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a subjective environmental scanning approach and a SWOT analysis technique through the author's observation of Brunei's halal logistics ecosystem from both intrinsic and extrinsic lenses.

Findings

The paper argues that substantial institutional support is an apparent strength, but the lack of halal logistics experts is a distinct weakness. Meanwhile, the growing use of technology presents an opportunity for the industry, but formidable regional competition poses a significant threat.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the paper's qualitative approach, insights from it could offer a better understanding of halal logistics in Brunei and serve a platform for future research endeavours.

Originality/value

Being a rentier state that depends on a non-renewable source, this paper offers an alternative strategy to diversify the economy and venture into the halal economy.

Details

Modern Supply Chain Research and Applications, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-3871

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Mohamed Syazwan Ab Talib

Despite the thriving global halal industry and logistics’ vital role in the halal supply chain, knowledge and research on halal logistics remain limited, particularly in…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the thriving global halal industry and logistics’ vital role in the halal supply chain, knowledge and research on halal logistics remain limited, particularly in Brunei Darussalam. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to understand the current state of knowledge by identifying the halal logistics constraints in Brunei Darussalam.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the theory of constraints, inductive reasoning and support from a review of relevant academic journal articles, to uncover the hindering factors surrounding halal logistics in the country.

Findings

The paper identifies five critical issues, which occur from internal and external factors, that constraint the growth of halal logistics in Brunei Darussalam.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative design limits this conceptual piece. However, the paper could be beneficial in informing the academic and industry circles of the potentials and challenges in Brunei Darussalam, particularly in its logistics sector.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate halal logistics in Brunei. The study positively contributes to the understanding of the halal logistics constraints in Brunei as well as adds to the growing body of halal logistics literature and enriching the halal research sphere.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

K. Noorliza

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of emergent resource-capability, its configurations and its impacts on customer service innovation and cost advantages…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of emergent resource-capability, its configurations and its impacts on customer service innovation and cost advantages in the context of the halal dynamic environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study performed a cluster analysis on a sample of 123 Malaysian halal-based third-party logistics (3PL) providers.

Findings

The findings reveal that the emergent resource-capability comprising physical, technology, knowledge, relational and organizational is advanced uniformly into low, medium and high level. The high resource-capability is significantly different with the medium and low resource-capability, while the medium resource-capability is significantly different with the low resource-capability. The extent of emergent resource-capability has a significantly positive effect on customer service innovation and cost advantage. Especially, high and medium resource-capabilities have enhanced greater customer service innovation and cost advantage significantly, indicating the higher the extent of resource-capability, the greater the enhancement of performance.

Practical implications

3PL providers or logistician professionals should understand the extent of emergent resource-capability to empower the competitiveness of service innovation and cost in the dynamic environment.

Originality/value

The study expands the knowledge with regard to resource-capability complexities which clarify the uniform extent of five emergent resource-capability naturally and provides empirical evidence on the emergent resource-capability of halal logistics services that can empower a successful halal logistics services and competitiveness.

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Mohamed Syazwan Ab Talib, Li Li Pang and Abdul Hafaz Ngah

The purpose of this paper is to identify the roles of government in promoting halal logistics.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the roles of government in promoting halal logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applied a systematic literature review (SLR) technique to assess published halal logistics academic literature.

Findings

The review identified six roles, namely, regulation, financial incentives, taxation, infrastructure, guidance and encouragement and education and labour supply.

Originality/value

This systematic review paper is considered amongst the first to attempt to consolidate the dispersed halal logistics literature and to systematically accentuate the pivotal role of government in the halal logistics industry.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Suhaiza Zailani, Mohammad Iranmanesh, Azmin Azliza Aziz and Kanagi Kanapathy

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the challenges and opportunities for logistics companies in Malaysia to adopt halal logistics. Logistics plays a key role in…

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3390

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to investigate the challenges and opportunities for logistics companies in Malaysia to adopt halal logistics. Logistics plays a key role in protecting the halal integrity of halal food through proper transportation, storage and handling along the supply chain until it reaches its final destination.

Design/methodology/approach

This research builds on existing research published in the Journal of Islamic Marketing on halal logistics. In addition to an extensive literature review, five focus group discussions were conducted to discover the challenges and opportunities with regards to halal logistics services in Malaysia.

Findings

The results show that the future market demands and the competitive opportunities related to halal services are the main motivators of first movers in halal logistics. The early adopters of halal logistics face several challenges such as ambiguous halal guidelines, lack of international halal certification, lack of collaboration among governing agencies (i.e. logistics service providers (LSPs), Jabatan Kemajuan Islam Malaysia (JAKIM) and Halal Industry Development Corporation), a lack of cost-effective standards, an overly competitive transportation sector, lack of demand, lack of halal logistics compulsion, financial challenges and a general misunderstanding of halal practices.

Practical implications

The findings of the present study may help government policy makers recognise the issues that should be addressed in motivating logistics companies to adopt halal practices.

Originality/value

Although halal logistics plays a key role in protecting the halal integrity of halal products, there are few halal LSPs. This study contributes to the advancement of knowledge on the challenges and opportunities of adopting halal logistics.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Elahe Fathi, Suhaiza Zailani, Mohammad Iranmanesh and Kanagi Kanapathy

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that motivate the consumers in Malaysia to pay for halal logistics and its consequences on their demand for halal

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2678

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that motivate the consumers in Malaysia to pay for halal logistics and its consequences on their demand for halal logistics certification.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey responded 313 randomly selected consumers. Partial least squares technique was employed in the analysis.

Findings

Results showed that consumers’ perception on halal logistics, their concern about halal, and media coverage have positive and significant effects on consumers’ willingness to pay for halal logistics. Furthermore, positive relationship exists between willingness to pay and the extent of demand for the halal logistics certification.

Practical implications

The findings of the study will be useful for the policy makers and managers of halal food companies because they can guide them in increasing the demand for the halal logistics.

Originality/value

Although halal logistics play a key role in supporting the halal status of any given halal foods, the demand for this service is low. Thus, this study contributes to the advancement of knowledge on the drivers of consumers’ willingness to pay for halal logistics.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Marco Tieman, Maznah Che Ghazali and Jack G.A.J. van der Vorst

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the preferred minimum level of segregation for halal meat in supermarket, transport, storage and terminals; the responsibility…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the preferred minimum level of segregation for halal meat in supermarket, transport, storage and terminals; the responsibility of halal logistics; and the willingness to pay for halal logistics in a Muslim and non‐Muslim country.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a comparative study involving Muslim consumers in Malaysia and The Netherlands. Cross‐sectional data were collected through a survey with 251 Muslims in Malaysia and 250 Muslims in The Netherlands. Data were analysed by means of nonparametric tests.

Findings

There is a preferred higher level of segregation in a Muslim country than a non‐Muslim country. A Muslim country has a higher willingness to pay for a halal logistics system as compared to a non‐Muslim country. Furthermore, there lies a heavy responsibility with the manufacturer to extend halal assurance towards supply chain management.

Research limitations/implications

The study confirms there is a need for a different level of segregation and therefore different halal logistics standard in a Muslim country and a non‐Muslim country. However, during the survey in The Netherlands significant rejections were received from especially first generation Muslims due to the lack of understanding of the Dutch language. Similar surveys need to be conducted in other countries in order to be able to generalise over the various Islamic schools of thought, local fatwas and local customs.

Practical implications

Halal logistics is important to the Muslim consumer and critical for the trust in a halal certified brand, which requires extending halal integrity from point of production to the point of consumer purchase.

Originality/value

This study is a preliminary one investigating the consumer perception on halal logistics. The study indicates the level of segregation required for a halal meat supply chain in a Muslim and non‐Muslim country.

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Mohamed Syazwan Ab Talib, Abu Bakar Abdul Hamid and Mohd Hafiz Zulfakar

The aim of this study is to discover the critical success factors (CSFs) for the Halal supply chain management because this area is gaining recognition. Plus, the aim is…

Downloads
4341

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to discover the critical success factors (CSFs) for the Halal supply chain management because this area is gaining recognition. Plus, the aim is to use the CSFs for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the application of CSFs on the Halal supply chain. A comprehensive literature review is undertaken to discover the CSFs of conventional supply chain and to apply it to the Halal supply chain.

Findings

Government support, transportation planning, information technology, human resource management, collaborative relationship, Halal certification and Halal traceability are the CSFs for the Halal supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

This study only discusses the CSFs related to the Halal supply chain and ignoring other forms of Halal businesses. This study only concerns on English literatures and omit other languages. The study lacks empirical evidence and future research should be done to test the CSFs relevancy.

Practical implications

This study addresses stakeholders of the Halal supply chain CSFs, which have not been fully understand and appreciated.

Originality/value

CSFs concept has never been attempted on the Halal supply chain. Therefore, this study appraises the concept of CSFs and adds value to the knowledge on the Halal supply chain.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2018

Nor Aida Abdul Rahman, Mohammad Fakhrulnizam Mohammad, Suzari Abdul Rahim and Hazariah Mohd Noh

This study aims to discuss the challenges in implementing halal warehouse in the air cargo context along with the standard handling process for the storage of halal

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1687

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discuss the challenges in implementing halal warehouse in the air cargo context along with the standard handling process for the storage of halal product for import and export purposes. This is vital to ensure that halal products do not get contaminated and should comply to halal logistics standard throughout the supply chain process.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study adopts single case study to better understand the definition of halal warehouse, the challenges in implementing halal warehouse and also the standard handling process for the storage at the warehouse for import and export purposes. A well-guided case study protocol is followed.

Findings

Five categories have found to be the main challenges in implementing halal warehouse. They are coded as halal product trade, halal asset and facility, halal standard of procedure, human factor and perspectives between logistics provider and halal agencies. With regard to standard handling process for import and export purposes in airgo context with compliance to Shariah at the halal warehouse, there are seven main steps involved for import and nine steps involved for export.

Research limitations/implications

As this paper is among the pioneer study that looks into halal warehouse implementation, it has some limitations. Further empirical study in a bigger context may be performed quantitatively, and multiple case study approach may also be adopted to get deeper insight in understanding halal warehouse implementation domain of study.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the understanding on the gap in the field with adhering or complying with the practice. It will provide input to the authority in understanding the current limitation and suggestion by the practicing companies.

Social implications

Halal requirement in non-Muslim countries are not very well implemented and understood, whereby the understanding of the concept of Halalal Toyyiban throughout the supply chain process is critical. The main aim of halal logistics is to avoid cross contamination between halal and non-halal product during the transport, at the storage in warehouse and also in handling. This study contributes to the understanding of halal warehouse implementation.

Originality/value

There is a critical dearth of academic study that focuses on halal logistics specifically in transport and warehouse. This empirical case study provides basic understanding of implementing halal warehouse and presents the challenges and also required guidelines in handling halal product at the warehouse for both import and export purposes.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Mohamed Syazwan Ab Talib and Abu Bakar Abdul Hamid

The purpose of this strengths or weaknesses, and its external opportunities or threats (SWOT) analysis study on Halal logistics industry in Malaysia is to identify SWOT in…

Downloads
8466

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this strengths or weaknesses, and its external opportunities or threats (SWOT) analysis study on Halal logistics industry in Malaysia is to identify SWOT in the Halal logistics environment and to uncover strategies to leverage on the strengths and opportunities and rectifying the weaknesses as well as overcoming the threats.

Design/methodology/approach

This study comprises two methods: literature review and interviews. Extensive literature reviews were obtained from leading databases and the articles recorded matches or related with the keywords. In addition, the respondents from the interviews consist of middle- and top-level managers with reputable knowledge, expertise and experience in the Logistics and Halal industry. After the literature was reviewed and information was transcribed from the interviews, reduction techniques were used to group and summarize the variables into the four SWOT categories.

Findings

The SWOT categories, consisting of SWOT, are generated from the literature reviews and supported by the respondents’ views and vice versa. Examples of SWOT analyses done are as follows: strength (strong government support), weakness (inconsistent Halal definition), opportunity (Muslims’ population growth) and threat (no uniformity on Halal standards).

Research limitations/implications

The SWOT analysis done for this study only demonstrates the internal and external environments and not the assumption that they are certain to be correct, as they contain every imaginable matter in relation to Halal logistics. Plus, the analysis done does not show how to achieve competitive advantage, merely as a guideline and the SWOT analysis done may be outdated as the environments are constantly changing.

Practical implications

The study hopes to contribute in future studies and act as a guide for the Halal logistics players to have better understanding in their business environment.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind, to incorporate SWOT and Halal logistics. Hence, this study will add in more value to the existing academic research done on SWOT analysis and broadening the Halal and logistics business understanding, not only in Malaysia but globally as well.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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