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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Maria Björklund and Helena Forslund

This study aims to illustrate how retail chains with a green image align sustainable logistics actions, logistics measurements and contracts with logistics service…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to illustrate how retail chains with a green image align sustainable logistics actions, logistics measurements and contracts with logistics service providers (LSPs), and to develop a classification model that allows for a description of the various shades of green within companies.

Design/methodology/approach

We carried out a multiple case study of four retail chains with a green image operating in the Swedish market, collecting empirical data from the retail chains’ sustainability reports and home pages and conducting interviews with logistics, transportation and supply chain managers.

Findings

Based on the literature, we developed a classification model for judging green image, green logistics actions, green measurements and green contracts. The model is used to illustrate the different shades of green found within the respective retail chains. A green image seems well-aligned with green logistics actions. However, there are more levels to judge, and the measurement systems are not sufficiently developed to track green logistics actions. Contract handling is more developed among retail chains than measurements, which is positive, as this is a way of ensuring that LSPs are involved. In our classification model, greenwashing can be judged in a more nuanced way, delving deeper under the surface.

Research limitations/implications

The provided classification model adds to our knowledge and illustrates the alignment within companies’ sustainable logistics. The robustness of the model can be strengthened by applying it to a larger number of cases and by continually validating its content and evaluation criteria.

Practical implications

The study’s main practical contribution is the classification model, which may potentially serve as a method for managers to easily judge the green alignment of a retail chain’s logistics.

Originality/value

Few empirical studies capture how retail chains measure environmental logistics performance, and even fewer concern contracts stipulating the environmental demands placed on LSPs.

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Usman Al-Minhas, Nelson Oly Ndubisi and Fatima Zahra Barrane

Green human resource management (GHRM) and sustainable green logistics (SGLOG) are some of the mechanisms by which sustainable corporate environmental management could be…

Abstract

Purpose

Green human resource management (GHRM) and sustainable green logistics (SGLOG) are some of the mechanisms by which sustainable corporate environmental management could be consummated. However, prior studies linking GHRM and green logistics are lacking in the literature. This paper extends prior efforts by developing a model linking GHRM and SGLOG.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative review of extant literature on green human resource management and sustainable green logistics was conducted, and an integrative model developed.

Findings

Improving environmental performance is a key way that businesses can improve their corporate social responsibility and brand image. The resulting model includes expanded components of GHRM (training, development, compensation, awards and recognition, recruitment, and performance management) and of SGLOG (transportation and shipping, warehousing, packaging, and reverse logistics). Categories of shipping and transportation include the following facets: transportation intensity, modal split, emissions intensity, energy efficiency, and vehicle utilization efficiency. The model also highlights the mediating role of management and employee attitudes, knowledge, and skills in the GHRM-SGLOG link, as well as their interaction.

Research limitations/implications

Green human resource management is associated with sustainable green logistics. This association is theoretically mediated by management and employee attitudes, knowledge, and skills. Top management support and influence of other stakeholders are key facilitators.

Practical implications

The paper suggests potential barriers to GHRM and SGLOG adoption/diffusion and panaceas. It also proposes some key drivers of sustainable green logistics and corporate environmental management.

Firms must carry out their operations in ways that do not compromise societal and environmental well-being. High economic performance alone no longer suffice. A balanced performance that also emphasizes social and environmental well-being (the triple bottom line, 3BL) can be achieve through the implementation of the proposed model.

Originality/value

The integrative model presented in the paper advances the current understanding of the link between GHRM and SGLOG. The paper adds additional value by unveiling some key future research directions.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Jens Tacken, Vasco Sanchez Rodrigues and Robert Mason

The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent to which the measures outlined in frameworks for guiding CO2e emissions reduction in road freight transport in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the extent to which the measures outlined in frameworks for guiding CO2e emissions reduction in road freight transport in the academic literature are actually being realised at a practical level.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative evaluation is carried out of the transport-related CO2e measurement and reduction initiatives in the German logistics sector through ten case study logistics service providers. For each, senior managers are interviewed with the findings synthesised through content-analysis. The initiatives are evaluated against an accepted leading framework model used to categorise CO2e emissions reduction initiatives.

Findings

The investigated firms, although at different evolutionary stages, understand that logistics and ecology do not, for the most part, contradict each other and both need to be considered in their companies’ long-term planning. The framework used to categorise CO2e emissions reduction initiatives in logistics provision is largely confirmed, but also refined.

Research limitations/implications

The research reaffirms and refines frameworks developed to encourage and assess green logistics practice, in a specific country's (Germany) logistics industry.

Practical implications

The analysis shows strong evidence that the options identified in theory are also valid for the German logistics service provider companies that were investigated. Most of the participating companies apply many of the operational options to reduce the environmental impact, although no one company is pursuing all the possible initiatives.

Originality/value

There is a lack of empirical studies which assess the application of green logistics initiatives identified in academic literature to practice. This paper contributes to filling this gap.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Ali Pazirandeh and Hamid Jafari

The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate whether or not greening efforts are dependent on a higher level company-wide sustainability strategy to be carried out…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate whether or not greening efforts are dependent on a higher level company-wide sustainability strategy to be carried out and whether or not greening efforts lead to any changes in logistics effectiveness and logistics efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on empirical data collected via a survey sent to logistics managers and transport purchasers at Nordic multinationals. The results were analysed using structural equation model as to validate the anticipated relationships between the designed constructs.

Findings

Within this research, the authors have tried to validate the existence of relationships between a company's sustainability strategy, its transportation greening efforts and logistics performance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper investigates the possible effect the sustainability strategy of the firm will have on its decision to green its transportation, and the possible effect these measures will have on logistics efficiency and effectiveness. The empirical data gathered for this research are regionally restricted to the Nordic region. Further research could empirically test these relationships with empirical data from other countries or industries, perhaps using other performance constructs, to see if the results hold true.

Practical implications

It is shown that companies with a sustainability strategy are focusing on greening their transportation both from purchasing and operations perspectives to improve their entire environmental performance. The results from this paper fail to support the assumption that company-wide sustainability strategies are imperative for supply chain greening.

Originality/value

The paper is among the first attempts in analysing the relationships between a company's sustainable strategy and its logistics performance through greening the transportation activities.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 62 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Deepti Chhabra, Rajesh Kr Singh and Vikas Kumar

Logistics companies are compelled to improve their efficiency and the environmental performance by introducing the green concept in their operations. The main purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Logistics companies are compelled to improve their efficiency and the environmental performance by introducing the green concept in their operations. The main purpose of the paper is to have continuous monitoring and tracking of logistics operations to enhance the green performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a case study approach. It illustrates a monitoring system to digitize the logistics activities by sending real-time GPS data to the server and capture the surrounding pictures with the help of the internet of things (IoTs) based camera. Data generated through digitization is mathematically analyzed for ensuring a green logistic system. The alerts due to the halts, help in keeping a check on fuel consumption, carbon emissions and security of logistics. Performance indicators such as carbon emissions and the value of travel time saving (VTTS) are selected for the study.

Findings

The findings of the study show that the actual travel time and distances are higher than the estimated travel time and distances. It also reveals that actual travel routes with diversions involve a considerably higher amount of carbon emissions during all sample travels. The results indicate a considerable saving in terms of carbon emissions, time and cost savings by effective practices of Green Logistics in Monitoring system (MSGL). These findings can help the top management of logistics companies in formulating effective strategies for technology applications in logistic operations to ensure green performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study has been carried out under certain set of conditions, which may vary depending upon the organizations. Also certain more environmental dimensions for performance monitoring can be used as a future scope of study. Further studies also need to be carried out to widen the scope of the MSGL model at a global level rather than only at local level.

Originality/value

Any organization which deploys transportation as part of their activity can use this MSGL model and then do the mathematical analysis to reduce the CO2 emissions, reduce the time and extra cost. The value of this study lies in the fact that government is trying different methods and models to reduce pollution. This MSGL should be made compulsory by the government as a part of their policies for environment of the country.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Amer Jazairy, Robin von Haartman and Maria Björklund

The green logistics literature remains undecided on how collaboration between shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) may facilitate green

Abstract

Purpose

The green logistics literature remains undecided on how collaboration between shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) may facilitate green logistics practices (GLPs). This paper identifies two types of collaboration mechanisms, relation specific and knowledge sharing, to systematically examine their influence on facilitating the different types of GLPs – as seen by shippers versus LSPs.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses of 169 shippers and 162 LSPs in Sweden were collected and analysed using exploratory- and confirmatory factor analysis, followed by multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that neither of the actors consistently favour a certain type of collaboration mechanisms for facilitating all types of GLPs. Although it was found that both actors share the same view on the role of collaboration mechanisms for some GLPs, their views took contrasting forms for others.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the green logistics literature by incorporating a trilateral distinction to present collaboration recommendations for GLPs, based on (1) the collaboration mechanism at play, (2) the actor's perspective and (3) the GLP in question.

Practical implications

Insights are offered to managers at shipper/LSP firms to apply the right (“fit for purpose”) collaboration mechanisms in their relationships with their logistics partners with respect to the desired GLPs.

Originality/value

This is one of the first large-scale studies to systematically reveal in what way collaboration can facilitate the different types of GLPs.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Yaw Agyabeng-Mensah, Esther Ahenkorah, Ebenezer Afum, Essel Dacosta and Zhongxing Tian

This study primarily explores the influence of green warehousing, logistics optimization and social values and ethics on supply chain sustainability and economic…

Abstract

Purpose

This study primarily explores the influence of green warehousing, logistics optimization and social values and ethics on supply chain sustainability and economic performance. The study further examines the mediating role of supply chain sustainability between economic performance and green warehousing, logistics optimization and social values and ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a quantitative research approach where survey data are collected from 200 managers of manufacturing companies in Ghana. The dataset is analyzed using partial least square structural equation modeling software (PLS-SEM) SmartPLS 3.

Findings

The results show that green warehousing and logistics optimization negatively influence economic performance but improves economic performance through supply chain sustainability. It is further discovered that social values and ethics have a positive influence on supply chain sustainability and economic performance.

Originality/value

This paper proposes and tests a theoretical model that explores the relationships between green warehousing, supply chain sustainability, economic performance, logistics optimization and social values and ethics through the resource dependency theory (RDT) in the manufacturing firms in Ghana.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Maria Huge-Brodin, Edward Sweeney and Pietro Evangelista

Various suggested paths for greening logistics and supply chains often address the specific perspectives of single supply chain actors. Drawing on stakeholder theory, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Various suggested paths for greening logistics and supply chains often address the specific perspectives of single supply chain actors. Drawing on stakeholder theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop a deeper understanding of the alignment between logistics service providers (LSPs) and shippers in the context of adopting more environmentally sustainable logistics practices.

Design/methodology/approach

With a case study approach, a dual perspective is taken in which both LSPs and shippers were researched. The cases comprise eight LSPs and six shipper companies in Sweden, Italy and Ireland. Information was first analysed in relation to levels of environmental awareness, customer requirements and provider offerings and critical success factors (CSFs) and inhibitors. In a second step, the findings were analysed using stakeholder theory.

Findings

LSPs demonstrate higher ambition levels and more concrete offerings compared to shippers' requirements for green logistics services. Paradoxically, customers are an important CSF and also an inhibitor for both LSPs and shippers. Both LSPs and shippers perceive financial factors and senior management priorities as important CSFs. The application of stakeholder theory helps to illuminate the importance of the many secondary stakeholders vs that of one or a relatively small number of primary stakeholders.

Originality/value

The three-dimensional analysis of environmental alignment between LSPs and shippers reinforces existing knowledge and provides new insights. A novel use of stakeholder theory in a supply chain context underlines its usefulness in research of this kind.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Amer Jazairy and Robin von Haartman

The purpose of this study is to measure the gaps between the engagements of shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) in different green

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to measure the gaps between the engagements of shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) in different green logistics practices (GLPs) throughout the key phases of the logistics purchasing process: request for proposal, negotiations, contracting and execution.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale survey of shippers and LSPs in Sweden was conducted. Respondents were 331 firms (169 shippers, 162 LSPs). Mean values of the actors' perceptions were analysed using independent- and paired sample t-tests.

Findings

While this study supports previous research indicating that LSPs engage more extensively in selling GLPs than shippers do in buying them, it shows that this conclusion does not uniformly apply to all GLPs nor all purchasing phases. Three patterns emerged for the gaps between the actors' buying-selling engagements throughout the purchasing process: (1) steady and wide gaps, (2) steady and narrow gaps and (3) emergent gaps. Distinct GLPs were associated with each pattern. It is also shown that the prioritisation of GLPs is fairly aligned between shippers and LSPs.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the green logistics purchasing literature by systematically and simultaneously creating three types of distinction, between (1) shippers and LSPs, (2) different GLPs and (3) different logistics purchasing phases. Future studies could replicate the analysis in countries other than Sweden.

Practical implications

Managers of shipper/LSP firms learn tips to spot the GLPs that their partners prioritise, enabling them to modify their purchasing/marketing strategies accordingly.

Originality/value

The three types of distinction represent a novel approach in the green logistics purchasing literature.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Karin Isaksson and Maria Huge‐Brodin

Awareness of environmental impacts on society is increasing among companies. In order to turn environmental problems into business opportunities, many companies are…

Abstract

Purpose

Awareness of environmental impacts on society is increasing among companies. In order to turn environmental problems into business opportunities, many companies are beginning to consider how environmental, or green aspects can be integrated into their service offerings. This opportunity can be of specific interest to logistics service providers, whose core business is an environmental impact in itself. The purpose of this article is to indicate where green‐labelled logistics service providers are positioned today in their development, and to seek the underlying rationale in development of green service offerings.

Design/methodology/approach

This article takes a logistics service provider's perspective and is based on a multiple case study of six companies. The analysis is based on cross‐case analysis, and empirical, as well as theoretical, pattern matching.

Findings

The attitude towards a green approach differs among the case companies: while some are working towards a green integration throughout the entire business, others offer green alternatives to the original service offering. The results point to possible explanations for these differences, and include differences in range of service offerings, size, and to different management principles for green aspects.

Practical implications

The article can inspire logistics service providers in their continuing work to integrate green initiatives into the company. By introducing alternative green approaches in the development of service offerings, logistics service providers can match their own business and context with alternative rationales.

Originality/value

While most of the green logistics research focuses on the logistics system's characteristics, this article offers initial insights into how the integration of green aspects into logistics services can impact logistics service providers.

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