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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Dwi Iryaning Handayani, Ilyas Masudin, Abdul Haris and Dian Palupi Restuputri

This paper aims to provide a brief bibliometric review of previous literature reviews in understanding halal suppliers in the food supply chain to achieve halal standards…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a brief bibliometric review of previous literature reviews in understanding halal suppliers in the food supply chain to achieve halal standards from upstream to downstream.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used was a structured literature review sample of during 2008–2020 totalling 142 articles. The authors use the R-package bibliometric and VOSviewer to find out information about journals, articles, authors, citations, keywords and word hierarchy maps.

Findings

The analysis reveals five research clusters: halal supply chain, food supply chain, supply chain integration, halal lifestyle, halal logistics.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on articles that discuss halal suppliers in the food supply chain.

Originality/value

Bibliometric reviews related to suppliers in the halal food supply chain in this study will help explore halal suppliers and be useful for researchers and practitioners in their fields as well as assist supplier management in the halal food supply chain.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Yusaini Hisham Mohamed, Abdul Rahman Abdul Rahim and Azanizawati Ma'aram

The purpose of this study is to outline the results of the empirical testing in the field of halal food supply chain and halal integrity assurance (HIA), as well as to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to outline the results of the empirical testing in the field of halal food supply chain and halal integrity assurance (HIA), as well as to provide a research framework of their relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on the exploratory research paper using quantitative data collection to empirically experimented with concepts and provide practical solutions for halal industry players to optimize their halal food supply chain integrity assurance.

Findings

The findings show the halal supply chain of the food and beverage industry has a significant effect on HIA. The results also suggest the halal industry with a high focus on supply chain business processes and supply chain network structure are expected to have better HIA.

Research limitations/implications

As this study only focuses on the halal industry in Malaysia specifically on food and beverages, its findings cannot be generalized to other categories. Issues of applicability of this study to other countries also need to be considered.

Practical implications

This study addresses the assurance of halal integrity is a crucial element in managing a halal food supply chain in the halal industry. It has empirically identified the important elements to strengthen halal food supply chain integrity assurance in the halal industry.

Social implications

It is important to manage knowledge, commitment and trust in any halal organization as a catalyst for HIA. This study presents a better understanding of the halal concept application in society.

Originality/value

There is a lack of empirical study on halal food supply chain integrity assurance even though the issue of HIA is widely discussed in the halal industry. Thus, this study has used an industry survey to empirically experimented with concepts and provide practical contributions to enhance halal food supply chain integrity assurance.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Shahbaz Khan, Mohd Imran Khan, Abid Haleem and Abdur Rahman Jami

Risk in the Halal food supply chain is considered as the failure to deliver the product which complies with Halal standards. The purpose of this paper is to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

Risk in the Halal food supply chain is considered as the failure to deliver the product which complies with Halal standards. The purpose of this paper is to identify the risk elements associated with Halal food supply chains and prioritise them appropriately towards better management.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a systematic literature review to identify various risk elements in the Halal food supply chain and consolidate them with the expertise of professionals and academicians. Further, the fuzzy analytic hierarchical process (fuzzy AHP) is applied to prioritise the identified risk elements.

Findings

The findings of the research suggest that “supply-related risks” are the most prominent risk. Raw material integrity issue is a vital element in the Halal food supply chain. The failure of the supplier to deliver material that complies with Halal standards reduces the industrial economic advantage. This study recommends that the integration of internal processes and outsourcing elements can mitigate the risk of the Halal food supply chain by having a holistic view of the processing and delivery of Halal foods.

Research limitations/implications

Systematic literature review and experts’ opinion are used to identify and consolidate risks. For the literature review, only the SCOPUS database is used; thus, there is a chance to overlook some risk elements. Additionally, the fuzzy AHP analysis depends on relative preference weight. Therefore, care should be taken while constructing a pairwise comparison matrix for risk elements.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can help the managers who have a holistic view on risk mitigation of the Halal food supply chain. This study may assist managers to share information about the processing of Halal food from top to bottom to manage risk.

Originality/value

This study may act as a baseline for undertaking future research in the area of risk management of the Halal food supply chain.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Mohd Hafiz Zulfakar, Caroline Chan and Ferry Jie

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of institutional forces in shaping the operations of halal meat supply chain in Australia, one of the world’s largest…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of institutional forces in shaping the operations of halal meat supply chain in Australia, one of the world’s largest producers and exporters of halal meat. This research examines how the halal meat production requirements are fulfilled and maintained throughout the supply chain in a non-Muslim-majority country.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a single-case study approach and uses semi-structured interviews as the primary method of data collection. It considers the perspectives of various stakeholder groups in the Australian halal meat supply chain (AHMSC). In all, 31 participants have participated in this research.

Findings

The findings show that institutional forces, especially which come through coercive forces, do affect and shape the overall operations of the AHMSC in particularly the way the stakeholders act within the supply chain, particularly in their role in ensuring the protection of halal status or halal integrity of the meat.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that the integrity of halal meat supply chain management operations in a non-Muslim-majority environment can be protected with heavy involvement from the relevant authorities, i.e. the federal government agency and the halal certifiers. With the implementation of specific halal meat production policy, i.e. Australian Government Authorised Halal Program, all parties dealing with the halal meat production for export purpose are obliged to fulfil the religious and food safety requirements, thus providing the necessary assurance for halal meat consumers, especially from the Muslim communities.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to provide insights of halal meat supply chain operations in a non-Muslim-majority environment. This paper also took in account various stakeholder groups that were involved directly with halal meat supply chain operations in Australia rather than focusing on a single stakeholder group which gives a better understanding of the whole supply chain operations.

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Marco Tieman

The paper aims to describe the basic requirements of Halal food supply chains in order to ensure the integrity of Halal food at the point of consumption, which is an…

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7948

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe the basic requirements of Halal food supply chains in order to ensure the integrity of Halal food at the point of consumption, which is an obligation for Muslims.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research paper is based on in‐depth interviews to better understand what is Halal, the Islamic sources that are essential for Halal supply chains, and identify the guidelines and principles which are essential for the integrity of Halal supply chains.

Findings

Halal supply chain management is based on avoiding direct contact with Haram, addressing the risk of contamination and ensuring that it is in line with the perception of the Muslim consumer. In particular, the product and market characteristics are important variables in the supply chain management of Halal supply chains. Further empirical research is needed to measure the perception of the Muslim consumer. A better understanding is also required into the principles in organising the Halal supply chain for different markets (Muslim and non‐Muslim countries). There is a need for a Halal supply chain model that is able to describe and optimise Halal supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

Since this paper is an exploratory study, it provides some insights into the considerations in organising Halal supply chains. However, further qualitative and quantitative research is needed in order to provide the industry with concrete tools to design effective Halal supply chains.

Practical implications

In response to the logistics industry that started with Halal logistics solutions, the Halal certified food industries needs to know whether and how to start with a Halal supply chain approach. This paper presented key considerations to address in organising effective Halal supply chains.

Social implications

Halal in non‐Muslim countries is not very well understood, where in logistics only the aspect of avoiding of contact with Haram is addressed mainly through packaging. This article presents a better understanding of Halal and the application of Halal in supply chain management.

Originality/value

There is a lack of academic research in Halal logistics and supply chain management. This exploratory research provides some basic fundamentals on the supply chain management of Halal products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Mohd Imran Khan, Abid Haleem and Shahbaz Khan

Halal supply chain management (HSCM) is an emerging research area and is in the early stage of evolution. This study aims to identify 11 critical factors towards effective…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal supply chain management (HSCM) is an emerging research area and is in the early stage of evolution. This study aims to identify 11 critical factors towards effective management of a Halal supply chain (HSC) and provides a framework for the HSCM by evaluating Halal practices' impact on sustainability performance measures empirically.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire-based survey has been carried out to collect data for analysis. The statistical analysis is accomplished by exploiting merits of factor analysis and structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The results imply that out of 11 critical factors, nine factors on effective management of the HSC are statistically significant, and impacts of two critical factors are positive but statistically insignificant. In the structural model, the path coefficient of all success indicators are positive and statistically significant. In terms of the path coefficient of sustainable performance measures of HSC, all three dimensions, economic, environmental and social, are positive and statistically significant.

Research limitations/implications

The research extends Halal and supply chain management's literature by proposing Halal as a standard quality control system, as it focuses on wholesome consumption. Effective management of the HSC is positively related to the firms' sustainable performance, thus helping managers make the organisation sustainable in the long term.

Practical implications

The research extends the literature of Halal and supply chain management by proposing Halal as a standard quality control system, which focuses on wholesome consumption. Effective management of the HSC is positively related to the sustainable performance of the firms, thus helps managers in making the organisation sustainable in the long term.

Originality/value

The result of the study underlines that sustainable performance measures are embedded in HSCM. This research develops a new paradigm in the research of HSCM and sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Norasekin Ab Rashid and Jamil Bojei

Muslim consumers have been shocked with the news of cross-contamination issues in the Halal food that they consumed. These issues make them put more effort in ensuring the…

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1112

Abstract

Purpose

Muslim consumers have been shocked with the news of cross-contamination issues in the Halal food that they consumed. These issues make them put more effort in ensuring the products that they purchased being monitored throughout the supply chain. In this case, food companies must be prepared to implement systematic traceability system to ensure the authenticity of Halal products and comprehend the importance of Halal industry environmental factors (HIEF) in enhancing integrity of Halal food supply chain and protect from any risk of cross-contaminations. This paper aims to clarify the relationship between the Halal traceability system adoption (HTSA) and HIEFs on Halal food supply chain integrity (HFSCIn).

Design/methodology/approach

The study opted quantitative research approach by using the self-administrated questionnaires. The questionnaires were distributed during Malaysia International Halal Showcase (MIHAS) 2014 and Halal Fiesta Malaysia (HALFEST) 2014. 127 Malaysian Halal food and beverages companies have been involved in the study. Most of the respondents are the general manager or owner of the company, Halal executives, quality assurance managers, operation managers and sales manager.

Findings

The study found that there is a significant relationship between HTSA and HIEF on HFSCIn. The study also found that the highest adoptions of Halal traceability system are among the producer and end user, while the highest contributions in influencing the HIEF are the economic and socio-cultural factors.

Research limitations/implications

This study only focused on Halal food industry particularly the food and beverages category. Thus, future study can explore further on every category in food industry such as raw materials and ingredients; poultry, meat and dairy; fast food and premises and make comparison between pharmaceutical, cosmetics and health care in Halal industry. In addition, the sample size (N = 127) can be considered small; therefore, it is recommended that in future the subject matter be explored with a much larger sample to allow generalization of the result.

Originality/value

This study provided, perhaps for the first time, an analysis of the relationship between traceability adoptions and HIEF on HFSCIn.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Malihe Manzouri, Mohd Nizam Ab Rahman, Nizaroyani Saibani and Che Rosmawati Che Mohd Zain

– This study aims to assess the possibility of implementing lean practices in the Halal food supply chain, and the barriers to their implementation.

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3175

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the possibility of implementing lean practices in the Halal food supply chain, and the barriers to their implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was used to identify the perceived issues and attitudes towards implementing lean practices in the supply chain. The questionnaire was distributed to 300 Halal food firms in Malaysia. A total of 61 usable replies were received.

Findings

More than 70 percent of the firms reported that lean supply chain (LSC) has not yet been implemented in their firm. Data analysis shows that 14 percent of non-lean firms urgently need to implement lean manufacturing. Market competition and uncertainty was highlighted as an important barrier in implementing LSC among lean firms. In contrast, lack of customer awareness of LSCM practices was recognised as a major barrier in non-lean firms.

Originality/value

There is little documentation regarding the status of LSC implementation in the Halal food industries, and therefore identifying the necessity of its implementation and the important impediments was identified as a gap in the existing literature. This paper provides insightful information on the necessity of implementing lean manufacturing practices in Halal food supply chains.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Fadhlur Rahim Azmi, Abu Abdullah, Haslinda Musa and Wan Hasrulnizzam Wan Mahmood

Food industry players obtain the advantages of profits growth within the halal industry whereby the market is dynamic to generate profit. Hence, this study aims to analyse…

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1070

Abstract

Purpose

Food industry players obtain the advantages of profits growth within the halal industry whereby the market is dynamic to generate profit. Hence, this study aims to analyse the perception of food manufacturers towards the adoption of the halal food supply chain (HFSC).

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, 103 halal food manufacturers in Malaysia were selected as respondents. Perceptions of respondents towards HFSC were recorded using a five-point questionnaire. The questionnaire was designed by authors and adapted from a previous study. The questionnaire was circulated by two experts with proficiency in this filed.

Findings

By conducting exploratory factor analysis, the study found the perception of food manufacturers, which is expected business benefits play an important role in the adoption of HFSC. Halal integrity becomes the second factor to lead the company to its adoption. Organizational readiness is the third factor that drives the company to adopt HFSC.

Research limitations/implications

Majority of the sample was responded by Bumiputera companies. The study suggests focussing the study for non-Bumiputera companies to examine their influence towards HFSC. Furthermore, future studies should explore different sectors of halal, such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, travel and tourism, logistics, finance and e-commerce. Moreover, ensuring the status of halal should be more emphasized in food chains; thus, the source of risk in HFSC should be explored to secure the integrity of halal.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the halal food industry, whereby the adoption of HFSC will contribute to the business benefits to create a more competitive advantage to the industry. Moreover, the implications of halal practice can create consumers’ trust on the halal product.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an analysed need to study specifically on upstream parties by adopting HFSC.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Kim Hua Tan, Mohd Helmi Ali, Zafir Mohd Makhbul and Azman Ismail

Much has been written about the importance of external integration for the integrity of food products. To achieve food integrity, all actors along the supply chain have to…

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1612

Abstract

Purpose

Much has been written about the importance of external integration for the integrity of food products. To achieve food integrity, all actors along the supply chain have to be fully integrated and comply with an assurance system or process. The more complex the supply chain operations are, the greater will be the need for integration. This research paper investigates the impact of external integration on compliance with halal standards, as an example of product integrity within the food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 1,000 food manufacturers was conducted. Partial least squares structural equation modelling was used to test the effect of external integration on compliance with halal standards.

Findings

The results showed that there were links between halal assurance system and external integration. Nevertheless, it was discovered that only customer integration mediated the relationship between the halal assurance system and product quality and production cost.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the findings extend to managers in the food industry who might pursue supply chain integration as a structure to achieve excellence. The findings suggested that the deployment of a halal assurance system has a positive effect on operational performance. Furthermore, the results show that managers who wish to implement the halal assurance system should carefully invest in an external integration strategy, depending upon the operational performance improvement intended.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first studies to investigate the effects of external integration on halal food in general and is the first empirical investigation of the effect of safeguarding halal integrity on operational performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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