Search results

1 – 10 of over 11000
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Norliza Katuk, Ku Ruhana Ku-Mahamud, Kalsom Kayat, Mohd. Noor Abdul Hamid, Nur Haryani Zakaria and Ayi Purbasari

Halal tourism is a subset of tourism activities geared towards Muslim which are aligned with the Islamic principles. As a response to this, many food operators have…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal tourism is a subset of tourism activities geared towards Muslim which are aligned with the Islamic principles. As a response to this, many food operators have realised the importance of having a halal certification to establish a better market position. In the context of Indonesia, it is yet to be known what attitudes the food operators have towards halal certification and what attributes characterised those who have obtained the certification. Therefore, this study aims to examine the attributes of food operators and their attitudes towards halal certification in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey and structured interview were conducted on 298 food operators in Bandung, a city in Indonesia, between August and December 2018. Seven hypotheses were proposed and tested to evaluate the association between halal certification and food operators’ attributes and their attitudes towards it.

Findings

The results of the study suggested that food operators who had halal certification can be characterised by the number of branches the businesses have, the knowledge of halal tourism and knowledge on the market segment. However, the age of their business was found not related to halal certification. In terms of attitudes, the study found that performance beliefs, intention to apply and target market segment had associated with halal certification.

Practical implications

The outcomes of the study could provide information to entities and agencies involved in the tourism industry that consider targeting Muslim travellers as their market segment. Halal certification could be an approach to facilitate tourism marketing and consequently increase the performance of food-related business sectors.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence that could lead to a better understanding of the attributes of food operators and their attitudes towards halal certification in the context of Indonesia’s tourism industry.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Simona Alfiero, Michael Christofi and Alessandro Bonadonna

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how food waste management can affect both retail and distribution operators’ efficiency performance and their ability to create…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how food waste management can affect both retail and distribution operators’ efficiency performance and their ability to create value. In particular, the paper shows how optimizing food waste management characterizes best practices and favors the development of sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey of 196 outdoor market operators (including farmers and street food traders) from 27 outdoor markets, the authors analyzed unsold food/food wastage processes vis-à-vis the operators’ behavior and attitude. To provide accurate definitions of the satisfaction levels, a consumer perception survey was carried out, with a usable sample of 2,107 questionnaires. The efficiency performance was evaluated according to data envelopment analysis.

Findings

The results showed that farmers operate more efficiently than street food traders and that the traditional management of unsold food/food waste is an important competitive element in this sector.

Research limitations/implications

The sample represents the Greater Turin Area in Italy, i.e., thus, limiting generalizability of the results. In addition, the variables analyzed were limited to certain aspects of selling processes and food waste management.

Practical implications

The results provide some indicators on how a more rational style of unsold food management can improve an operators’ performance and help make a social impact.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that analyses outdoor market operators’ efficiency, based on the use of food waste as a variable affecting their performance.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Joanne Zaida Taylor and Luke Budworth

The purpose of this paper is to examine trends in safety and quality culture, using quantitative data gathered from food companies who have taken the Culture Excellence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine trends in safety and quality culture, using quantitative data gathered from food companies who have taken the Culture Excellence assessment. It is the fourth paper in a theme issue of Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, discussing the importance of measuring food safety and quality culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative elements of the Culture Excellence assessment were analysed, exploring the differences between different dimensions of culture and the potential variation between managers, supervisors and operators.

Findings

Managers were found to generate higher scores for the culture of their company than operators, and to have particularly higher scores in certain dimensions of culture (e.g. Empowerment). Operators however reported receiving food safety training more frequently. Operators were also more likely to have a positive result on practical elements of the assessment (e.g. targets) than psychological ones (e.g. reward). All of the above findings were statistically significant at p < 001 with small to medium effect sizes.

Originality/value

This paper introduces quantitative data on food safety culture from the food industry with quantitative analysis to highlight issues and trends. It will be of value to food safety and quality practitioners, trainers, auditors and other stakeholders involved in the food industry.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Benjamin Chapman, Tanya MacLaurin and Douglas Powell

Despite extensive investments in food handler training, research suggests that training programs are inconsistent, and rarely evaluated for efficacy. The generic…

2221

Abstract

Purpose

Despite extensive investments in food handler training, research suggests that training programs are inconsistent, and rarely evaluated for efficacy. The generic prescriptive content and school‐like delivery methods used in current food safety training may be a barrier to application. The purpose of this paper is to develop a food safety communication tool, food safety infosheets, targeted specifically to foodservice food handlers, utilizing popular media stories to illustrate the consequences of poor food handling.

Design/methodology/approach

Food safety infosheets were designed to be surprising, connect food handlers' actions and consequences, and generate discussion through a verbal narrative framework. A Delphi‐like exercise (n=19), a posting pilot (n=8) were carried out to assess the appropriateness of the concept of food safety infosheets. An intense participatory ethnographic study with an Ontario, Canada, restaurant, and in‐depth interviews with food service operators in Manhattan, Kansas, and Lansing, Michigan, (n=17) were conducted to gather qualitative data on the food service kitchen environment, including barriers to food safety practices, and the communication preferences of those who work in such kitchens.

Findings

The expert group, foodservice operators, and food handlers accepted food safety infosheets as an appropriate concept and valued storytelling as an effective communication strategy. Learning in the kitchen environment is largely hands‐on and visual, and time pressure dictates practices. It is often difficult to attract and keep the attention of food handlers. Storytelling, celebrity and local outbreaks are of interest to the target audience.

Originality/value

This paper provides a blueprint for the design and refinement of food safety communication tools targeted towards a specific audience. By utilizing multiple methodologies, it provides a framework for other researchers to follow.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Petri Niemi and Petra Pekkanen

Estimating the business potential for local food intermediary businesses, like wholesales and retailing, can be extremely difficult. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Estimating the business potential for local food intermediary businesses, like wholesales and retailing, can be extremely difficult. The purpose of this paper is to present an approach at finding out the possibilities of estimating the business potential of a business idea in advance.

Design/methodology/approach

In the approach, a model is built based on two data sources. Statistical data on the food expenditure of households and average division of the revenues and margins of the local food supply chain are divided to production, intermediate level (wholesales/distribution) and retailing stages. To estimate the regional local food business potential as a whole, the market share estimations have been made by local food experts.

Findings

The approach was tested and utilized in evaluating the feasibility of a local food wholesale business in South-East Finland. It produced a credible overview of the business potential and pinpointed the challenges of the local food wholesales. The study indicated also that expressing the feasibility in terms of the required market share for employee count is an easy-to-understand way to depict the feasibility of a business.

Research limitations/implications

The model gives indicative, industry average-based results: the results of the model should be refined with analyses on the particular business model, especially its cost efficiency and other competitive parameters compared to more traditional way of doing business.

Practical implications

The model helps local food entrepreneurs and firms as well as their financiers to get a realistic picture of the business potential and the economic feasibility of the targeted business.

Originality/value

The study introduces a novel approach combining quantitative data and expert evaluation for evaluating the market potential and economic prerequisites of a regional food supply chain operator.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2014

Jian Pei Kong and Sameeha Mohd Jamil

The aim of this study was to determine the levels of satisfaction (food quality, service quality, ambience, price and portion) among postgraduate Health Sciences students…

2120

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to determine the levels of satisfaction (food quality, service quality, ambience, price and portion) among postgraduate Health Sciences students on the cafeteria facilities in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Kuala Lumpur Campus. In Malaysia, the total number of postgraduate in higher institution increase from 75,199 in 2007 to 85,236 in 2010, an increment of 12 per cent. The increasing numbers of higher education postgraduates on university campuses has unquestionably raised the expansion of demand for food service availability and quality on campus.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-reported questionnaire was to 86 subjects at Faculty of Health Sciences, UKM, from September to November in 2012.

Findings

The findings showed that ambience and service attributes turned out to be the most dissatisfied attributes. Malay and non-Malay post-graduate Health Science students showed no significant difference on the satisfaction toward the four attributes. Respondents believed that increasing menu variation and introducing franchise outlet were the two supplementary factors that may increase satisfaction level.

Research limitations/implications

The major drawback of this study is the inability to generalize findings to the students’ satisfaction toward UKM KL food service because data of the current study were only assessing postgraduate students.

Originality/value

The points developed from this study clearly indicate the level of satisfaction among postgraduate Health Science student against food service system in one of the famous research university in Malaysia, UKM.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Francis Eric Amuquandoh and Ramos Asafo‐Adjei

Individuals including tourists are known to be selective as to what they consider as appropriate food. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the traditional foods

3127

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals including tourists are known to be selective as to what they consider as appropriate food. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the traditional foods consumed by international tourists during their stay in Ghana, using the Analytical Hierarchical Process Model.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used for the study were collected from a random sample of 675 out‐bound international tourists in Ghana at the departure lounge of the Kotoka International Airport between February and March, 2010.

Findings

In total, 17 traditional foods were popular among Ghana's international tourists, with red red being the most favoured food whilst impotupotu was the least preferred food. It was concluded that Ghana has the potential to have a thriving local food industry that could be based on the seven topmost foods.

Research limitations/implications

As the first description of traditional food preferences among Ghana's international visitors, this study is intended to provide a strong point for more in‐depth studies of the special qualities and attractiveness of the various traditional foods in Ghana.

Practical implications

The observation that international tourists on holiday in Ghana patronize a great variety of Ghanaian foods suggests that there is a substantial market of food‐interested visitors that needs to be nurtured. The current awareness and interest in Ghanaian foods need to be sustained by improving on the packaging, service quality, and sanitary conditions of most eating places, as well as the efficiency of regulatory institutions including the Food and Drugs Board, the Ghana Standards Board, and the Ghana Tourists Board Given that red red is more likely to sell or be consumed by Ghana's international visitors, food operators, including restaurants, food vendors, traditional catering points and hotels have to be sensitized to include this food item in their menus at all times.

Social implications

This finding also signifies that the country can reduce loss of revenue overseas if the large food imports to feed international tourists are reduced. The consumption of locally produced food items and the utilization of local ingredients in the preparation of tourist menus are known to reduce imports and leakage of tourism revenue from the local economy. The study also has a potential of assisting Ghana to project its culture through food. It has been established that traditional foods constitute essential components in the understanding of the culture of a society and also constitute an important medium for cultural expression.

Originality/value

This study makes a valuable contribution by highlighting tourists' tastes in Ghana. Finally, an insight into tourists' food consumption and preferences is vital to the maximization of the potential associated with tourism. Researchers such as Mitchell et al., suggest that consumer behaviour research is important for stakeholders in the wine and food industry because it can help provide important insights into who the wine or food tourist is and how marketers – restaurant and café owners, bed and breakfast operators, food producers and managers – can effectively target and develop markets.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Linda Margaret Roberts and Margaret Deery

This paper examines the implementation of recent changes to Victorian food safety legislation with particular reference to the implications for the foodservice industry…

2990

Abstract

This paper examines the implementation of recent changes to Victorian food safety legislation with particular reference to the implications for the foodservice industry. The research findings reported in this paper are based on a major food safety management audit undertaken for the Victorian Auditor General's Office. The components of the audit, on which this paper is based, involved a quantitative survey of all 79 of the Victorian local councils, in‐depth qualitative audits of 12 of these councils selected across the range of councils, from central business district to urban, suburban and rural locations, and a telephone survey of 219 food businesses within these 12 councils. Concludes that, to improve food safety awareness among operators, local councils need to pay attention to the provision of effective education and training programs, to the timely review of food safety programs, and to have a risk‐based approach to inspections.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2020

Lusine Aramyan, Matthew Grainger, Katja Logatcheva, Simone Piras, Marco Setti, Gavin Stewart and Matteo Vittuari

Agri-food supply chains are facing a number of challenges, which cause inefficiencies resulting in the waste of natural and economic resources, and in negative…

4051

Abstract

Purpose

Agri-food supply chains are facing a number of challenges, which cause inefficiencies resulting in the waste of natural and economic resources, and in negative environmental and social impacts. Food waste (FW) is a result of such inefficiencies and supply chain actors search for economically viable innovations to prevent and reduce it. This study aims to analyse the drivers and the barriers that affect the decision of supply chain operators to adopt innovations (technological – TI, organisational – OI and marketing – MI) to reduce FW.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis was carried out using a four-step approach that included: a literature review to identify factors affecting the decision to adopt innovations; analysis of FW drivers and reduction possibilities along agri-food supply chains through innovations; mapping the results of Steps 1 and 2 and deriving conclusions regarding the factors affecting the adoption of innovations to reduce and prevent FW.

Findings

Results show that different types of innovations have a high potential in reducing and preventing FW along the supply chain; however, they still must be economically feasible to be adopted by decision makers in the food supply chain. TI, OI and MI are often interrelated and can trigger each other. When it comes to a combination of different types of innovation to reduce and prevent FW, a good example of combining TI, OI and MI may be observed in the retail sector in Europe. Here, innovative smartphone apps (TI) to promote the sale of products nearing their expiration dates (OI in terms of organising the sales differently and MI in terms of marketing it differently) were developed and adopted via different retailing channels, leading to the creation of a new business model.

Practical implications

This study analyses the drivers of FW generation together with the factors affecting the decision to adopt innovations to reduce it and provides solutions to supply chain operators to prevent and reduce FW through different types of innovations.

Originality/value

Literature has not systematically addressed innovations aiming at the reduction of FW yet. This paper provides a comprehensive literature review of the determinants of innovation adoption and offers a novel view on the problem of FW reduction by means of innovation, by linking factors affecting the decision to innovate with FW drivers.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Vanja Prevolšek, Andrej Ovca and Mojca Jevšnik

This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the compliance of hygienic and technical standards of street food vendors in Slovenia with the requirements of the general…

1219

Abstract

Purpose

This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the compliance of hygienic and technical standards of street food vendors in Slovenia with the requirements of the general hygienic food principals set in the Codex Alimentarius and Regulation (EC) No. 852/2004 on the hygiene of foodstuffs.

Design/methodology/approach

Food vendors were observed directly and discretely using a semi-structured observation sheet that allowed fast evaluation. The employee's behaviour was not affected during the observations because they were not aware of being observed. Each observation lasted approximately 30 min. Food vendors were divided into groups according to their location, type of facility, number of employees and type of food sold.

Findings

Depending on the type of street vendor, more inconsistencies were found amongst food stands compared to food trucks and kiosks. Most food trucks and kiosks scored very high in both personal and hygienic-technical standards. Some of the major inconsistencies were lack of suitably located washbasins, improper hand-washing technique, improper waste management, working surfaces that were inadequately separated from consumers, and inconsistent maintenance of the cold chain. Food handlers have been confirmed as a critical risk factor.

Research limitations/implications

Despite methodology validation, the data was collected by a single observer, limiting the ability to obtain a more reliable estimate of the observations. The sample was disproportionate according to the type of street food facilities.

Practical implications

The results provide a basis for (1) national professional guidelines of good hygiene practices for food business operators, which should cover street food vendors more extensively in future updates, and (2) the development of food safety training programmes tailored for street vendors.

Originality/value

The study provides valuable insights into current hygienic-technical conditions of the street food vending sector.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 11000