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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2009

Graham Turpin, Jeremy Clarke, Ruth Duffy and Roslyn Hope

Two years ago, we published within this journal a scoping article (Turpin et al, 2006) concerning the urgent need to review and enhance the workforce responsible for delivering…

Abstract

Two years ago, we published within this journal a scoping article (Turpin et al, 2006) concerning the urgent need to review and enhance the workforce responsible for delivering psychological therapies to people seeking help for common mental health problems in primary care (London School of Economics, 2006). We estimated that the demand for such interventions, the service models that might deliver increased capacity for psychological treatments, the implications for workforce numbers and the impact that this would have on education and training. Much of the thinking that was adopted within the review was based on current development work around the mental health workforce led by the National Workforce Programme sponsored by the National Institute for Mental Health England (NIMHE) on New Ways of Working (NWW).The current paper reflects on the process and the added value that NWW has contributed to what is a radical new venture, which has been described by the lead evaluator of the pilot Improving Access for Psychological Therapies (IAPT) phase, Professor Glenys Parry, as 'the industrialisation of psychological therapies'. More specifically, it reviews the implementation of a national programme designated as IAPT, which was commissioned on the basis of the NWW work, and the evidence accrued from the IAPT national demonstration sites at Doncaster and Newham, together with the efforts of Lord Layard and the New Savoy Partnership.The first year implementation of IAPT is described, together with the lessons learned from the roll out. As the programme has developed, it has become important to ensure that clients also have a choice of evidence‐based interventions. NWW has provided a means to help practitioners come together from a range of therapeutic orientations and professions to contribute to this more diverse workforce. Finally, it is argued that NWW has been instrumental in helping managers and professions alike think more flexibly about service models and provision, and how to develop a new workforce competent to deliver such an innovative service.

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Graham Turpin, Roslyn Hope, Ruth Duffy, Matt Fossey and James Seward

Despite the emergence of NICE guidelines regarding the effectiveness and appropriateness of psychological therapies for the majority of common mental health problems, access to…

Abstract

Despite the emergence of NICE guidelines regarding the effectiveness and appropriateness of psychological therapies for the majority of common mental health problems, access to these services is still dramatically underdeveloped and uneven. Estimates of untreated problems such as depression and anxiety in primary care signal the extent of these problems and the scale of investment in new services, if these needs are to be adequately met in the future.The Department of Health's and the Care Services Improvement Partnership's (CSIP) Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme sets out a framework and a series of co‐ordinated actions, including two national demonstration sites, to begin to address these issues in England.This paper examines the origins and policy drivers that have given rise to the IAPT programme, outlines the progress to date and specifically assesses the implications for the mental health workforce of this programme. Issues addressed include the workforce profiles of existing services, career frameworks for psychological therapists, the capacity of training providers to train new and existing staff in psychological therapies and the challenges implicit in devising a workforce delivery plan to support the IAPT programme.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Jennifer J. Ashcroft and Graham Turpin

NHS targets for training clinical psychologists have not been met.Unless training resources are increased there will continue to be ashortfall in service provision. In order to…

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Abstract

NHS targets for training clinical psychologists have not been met. Unless training resources are increased there will continue to be a shortfall in service provision. In order to ascertain those areas where training resources are most needed, a postal questionnaire survey of all British clinical psychology training courses was conducted. There was a 73 per cent response rate. Results showed that major areas of need are: (1) increased recruitment of course staff whose major responsibility is training, rather than an over reliance on clinical psychologists who have major NHS responsibilities; (2) greater representation of specialist areas; some priority services such as work with older adults or people with learning disabilities are under‐represented; and (3) more equitable pay – not all university courses offer salaries on clinical scales.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

S. Turpin‐Brooks and G. Viccars

To highlight the importance of effective post occupancy evaluation (POE) as part of a sustainable approach to workplaces and guide facilities professionals in their choice of POE…

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Abstract

Purpose

To highlight the importance of effective post occupancy evaluation (POE) as part of a sustainable approach to workplaces and guide facilities professionals in their choice of POE tools.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review provides an insight into sustainability and an introduction to POE options, with detailed discussion of key factors influencing the effectiveness of POE. A POE case study (at the Eden Project) provides an applied analysis of POE tools, focussing particularly on the usefulness of obtainable data.

Findings

POE is shown to be useful in addressing client satisfaction and user needs as part of sustainability assessments. Improvements to the assessment of occupants' experiences are suggested, in consideration of a more holistic approach to POE.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is grounded in UK experience, but the international relevance of the issues could also be explored by readers/further research. Further exploration of novel and holistic methodologies is needed, in order to test the integrated value of the evaluation of environmental data and human perceptions.

Practical implications

This paper will help facilities professionals determine suitable POE approaches for workplaces, as part of an evaluation of available tools.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates a current topic in the property sector and demonstrates the value that facilities professionals can provide in implementing effective POE of workplaces.

Details

Facilities, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2009

Tony Lavender

This paper provides a review of the impact of three of the six work streams from the New Ways of Working for Applied Psychologists. The organisational change model of Beckhard and…

Abstract

This paper provides a review of the impact of three of the six work streams from the New Ways of Working for Applied Psychologists. The organisational change model of Beckhard and Harris (1989) is used to evaluate why the recommendations of the reports are being adopted at different speeds. Evidence that all are being used is presented. The paper starts with a restatement of the purpose of applied psychology that was developed during the work and is likely to stand the test of time.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 December 2009

Stephen Kellett, Nigel Beail, Alick Bush, Graham Dyson and Mark Wilbram

Single case experimental design (SCED) has a long, well‐respected tradition in evaluating the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for people with learning disabilities and…

Abstract

Single case experimental design (SCED) has a long, well‐respected tradition in evaluating the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviours. However, shift the focus to other psychological modalities (such as psychodynamic psychotherapy) or differing presenting problems (such as interpersonal problems) and the use of SCED methodologies is severely curtailed. This paper describes the application of SCED methodologies in the evaluation of treatment of three clients: the psychodynamic psychotherapy of hypochondriasis in an A/B design, psychodynamic psychotherapy of ambulophobia in an A/B design, and cognitive‐behavioural therapy of anger and aggression in a shifting criterion design. Visual and statistical analysis of the time series data revealed that the hypochondriasis and the anger cases responded to treatment, whereas the ambulophobia case showed some deterioration during the intervention. The cases are discussed in terms of the strengths and weaknesses of the methodologies applied and the relative merits of accruing SCED evidence in the evaluation of the plethora of psychological modalities now being made available to learning disabled clients.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Matthew Cunningham and Graham Walton

This paper aims to explore at Loughborough University (UK) how informal learning spaces (ILS) are used by students in the Library and elsewhere on campus. Focus includes learning…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore at Loughborough University (UK) how informal learning spaces (ILS) are used by students in the Library and elsewhere on campus. Focus includes learning activities undertaken by students, reasons why the ILS is chosen, suggestions on how they can be improved and how technologies are used. Comparison will be drawn between how students use Library ILS and other ILS.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study based at Loughborough University and its Library. Semi-structured interviews were held with 265 students in various ILS spaces across campus.

Findings

Similarities and differences are present in the way students use Library ILS compared with other ILS campus spaces. These include impact of campus geography and individual academic levels of students.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single case study and the results can only relate to Loughborough University. There may be some lessons and themes that are relevant to other universities. The number of interviewees is relatively small.

Practical implications

Highlights the need for cooperation between various university stakeholders to strategically and operationally manage different ILS on campus.

Originality/value

This is one of the very few studies that investigate together the range of ILS including the Library in a comparative approach.

Details

New Library World, vol. 117 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 December 2021

Jessica Cartwright, Daniel Lawrence and Christopher Hartwright

This study aimed to explore how forensic mental health service users make sense of their past adverse experiences. Secondly, it aimed to explore whether service users considered…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to explore how forensic mental health service users make sense of their past adverse experiences. Secondly, it aimed to explore whether service users considered their adverse experiences to be related to their current stay in a forensic mental health setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyse interviews with eight service users in low and medium secure care. Six of the participants were male and two were female.

Findings

Four super-ordinate themes emerged from the data: “Living amongst adversity”; “Managing adverse experiences”; “Making sense of going into secure care”; and “Coping with the past in the present”. All participants referred to multiple adverse experiences throughout their lives and used harmful coping strategies to manage these. Individual differences in how they related their past experiences to their detention in secure care were evident.

Practical implications

Author guidelines state that this section is optional. Implications for clinical practice are discussed at length in the discussion section.

Originality/value

This study offers an insight into the way in which forensic mental health service users make sense of their past traumas in relation to their current admission to secure services. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no research has previously addressed this from the perspective of service users.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2017

Geoffrey Lau, Pamela Meredith, Sally Bennett, David Crompton and Frances Dark

It is difficult to replicate evidence-informed models of psychosocial and assertive care interventions in non-research settings, and means to determine workforce capability for…

Abstract

Purpose

It is difficult to replicate evidence-informed models of psychosocial and assertive care interventions in non-research settings, and means to determine workforce capability for psychosocial therapies have not been readily available. The purpose of this paper is to describe and provide a rationale for the Therapy Capability Framework (TCF) which aims to enhance access to, and quality of, evidence-informed practice for consumers of mental health services (MHSs) by strengthening workforce capabilities and leadership for psychosocial therapies.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by literature regarding the inadequacies and inconsistencies of evidence-informed practice provided by publicly-funded MHSs, this descriptive paper details the TCF and its application to enhance leadership and provision of evidence-informed psychosocial therapies within multi-disciplinary teams.

Findings

The TCF affords both individual and strategic workforce development opportunities. Applying the TCF as a service-wide workforce strategy may assist publicly-funded mental health leaders, and other speciality health services, establish a culture that values leadership, efficiency, and evidence-informed practice.

Originality/value

This paper introduces the TCF as an innovation to assist publicly-funded mental health leaders to transform standard case management roles to provide more evidence-informed psychosocial therapies. This may have clinical and cost-effective outcomes for public MHSs, the consumers, carers, and family members.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Graham Matthews and Graham Walton

The purpose of this paper is to explore issues, approaches and challenges in providing strategic direction to university libraries on developing their physical space in what is…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore issues, approaches and challenges in providing strategic direction to university libraries on developing their physical space in what is increasingly a digital age. A key aspect of the work is to explore how university libraries and their senior staff can widen libraries’ role to inform the strategic direction of formal and informal learning spaces across the institution.

Design/methodology/approach

Research and perspectives from across the world provide the context for the study. A single site case study based at Loughborough University in the UK is explored to demonstrate how strategy for university library space is developed. The case study also provides an example of how a university library has extended its influence on other informal learning spaces.

Findings

University library physical space has an important role in learning, teaching and research, despite the increase in digital information provision. For effective strategy, information and evidence needs to be collected from a wide range of sources. The experience and skills that university libraries have developed in managing learning spaces can be transferred to learning spaces elsewhere in the university.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single site case study.

Practical implications

The case study provides approaches and ideas that can be applied by university libraries in the strategic development of learning spaces.

Originality/value

The paper provides an innovative and informed insight into how university libraries can influence learning and teaching spaces across university campus/site. Further research would be valuable to identify practice more widely. Surveying, from a library perspective, university and university estate, management strategies for content relating to libraries and formal and informal spaces across the institution and what is going on/being planned in this area would further progress the debate.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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