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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1984

Charles Margerison and Dick McCann

Why do some teams work effectively and others not? The authors, in examining the attributes of High Performing Teams, show that there are three major areas which team

Abstract

Why do some teams work effectively and others not? The authors, in examining the attributes of High Performing Teams, show that there are three major areas which team leaders need to concentrate upon. These are example, experience and expertise. There are certain work functions that are critical to success and there is a need for every work team to have a member who can co‐ordinate and integrate these functions. This person performs the “linking” role.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

David F. Elloy

The purpose of this paper was to examine the impact of superleader behaviors in self‐managed work teams, on organization commitment, job satisfaction and organization self‐esteem.

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7888

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine the impact of superleader behaviors in self‐managed work teams, on organization commitment, job satisfaction and organization self‐esteem.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected on‐site over a period of three days from employees working in a non‐union paper mill located in a small rural community in the northwestern region of the USA. The survey was completed by 141 employees, representing a 9 per cent response rate. Self‐leadership, organization commitment, job satisfaction and organization self‐esteem were all measured using different instruments.

Findings

The results indicated that teams groups that were led by a supervisor who exhibited the characteristics of a superleader had higher levels of organization commitment, job satisfaction, and organization self‐esteem.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a small sample and relied on self‐report data, thereby allowing for the possibility of same source bias. However, this is a common problem with cross‐sectional designs.

Practical implications

Leading in a self‐managed work team environment requires a unique approach to leadership. The results of this study illustrated that superleader behaviors result in some beneficial outcomes for organizations including enhanced levels of organization commitment, job satisfaction and organization self‐esteem. It behoves organizations to encourage, through training programs, the development of these behaviors.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Charles Margerison and Dick McCann

Introduction All managers and supervisors are dependent on the performance of their team members. Unless these subordinates perform effectively, then the manager or…

Abstract

Introduction All managers and supervisors are dependent on the performance of their team members. Unless these subordinates perform effectively, then the manager or supervisor will be seen in most cases to have failed. As Brown has noted, “the supervisor generally is more dependent on the work group than on the individual employee, because the work group's performance provides a measure of his or her supervisory capabilities”. We have recently been looking at the work of managers and supervisors in relation to the groups that they lead, to try to identify those factors which contribute to the success of a team. We have been able to identify a number of factors which define what we call High Performing Teams (HPTs). One of these factors is the linking factor — that is, all teams need a manager or supervisor who acts as a critical “link person” in getting things done.

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Management Decision, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Manoucher Mossadeghian Golestani and Nigel van Zwanenberg

Aims to measure the differences which may exist between a number of team aspects for groups working on projects with two different contractual bases: cost‐plus (CP) and…

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805

Abstract

Aims to measure the differences which may exist between a number of team aspects for groups working on projects with two different contractual bases: cost‐plus (CP) and fixed‐price (FP). Investigates work groups from engineering companies. Measures team characteristics and their perceived value to team members using self‐report questionnaires. Analyses the primary data obtained using statistical means. The findings show that team members did perceive differences in about half of the team aspects studied. Generally the feeling of “teamness” was higher in the CP project groups. Discusses the implications for management of the impact of the contractual base on the environment of teams, and suggests that the questionnaire may have application elsewhere as a management tool.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2001

Anita D. Bhappu, Mary Zellmer-Bruhn and Vikas Anand

Work teams have gained increasing importance as businesses shift to knowledge-based organizational structures. At the same time, advances in information technology have…

Abstract

Work teams have gained increasing importance as businesses shift to knowledge-based organizational structures. At the same time, advances in information technology have facilitated this change by enabling virtual work environments. To add to this complexity, the increasing demographic diversity of workers is coinciding with the rise in virtual and knowledge-based work environments. Therefore, it is critical that we understand the impact of these changes as they coincide in organizations today.

One of the extolled virtues of work teams is their potential to combine the unique knowledge held by individual workers, integrating these knowledge resources to bear on productive tasks. To effectively utilize their distributed knowledge, work teams have to perform three basic knowledge-processing activities: (a) knowledge acquisition; (b) knowledge integration; and (c) knowledge creation. However, work teams often have difficulty processing their distributed knowledge. The ability of team members, or lack thereof, to work effectively with each other is usually the problem.

The increasing demographic diversity of workers presents similar challenges for organizations. Demographically diverse workers have more unique knowledge, leading to increased knowledge differentiation in work teams. A work team that has high knowledge differentiation is one whose members possess different expertise. The unique knowledge held by individual team members effectively enlarges a work team's pool of knowledge resources. However, the increasing demographic diversity of workers often results in work teams having more difficulty processing their distributed knowledge because team members are not able to work effectively with different others. That being the case, the potential for demographically diverse work teams to more effectively perform productive tasks is lost.

We realize that demographically diverse work teams are a special (and important) case of teams in that they are both high on differentiated knowledge and high on the potential for conflict and other process losses. However, with an increasingly global marketplace, this special case is quickly becoming commonplace. Therefore, it is critical that we find ways to help demographically diverse work teams limit their process losses and realize their full potential.

Virtual work environments only heighten the need for demographically diverse work teams to minimize their process losses. Team members are often separated by both geographic space and time, which makes it even more challenging for them to work effectively with each other. In such environments, team members are often isolated from one another and find it difficult to feel a part of their team. Interestingly, computer-mediated communication has been shown to enhance team performance by helping team members communicate more effectively with each other. In fact, empirical work by Bhappu, Griffith, and Northcraft (1997) suggests that computer-mediated communication can actually help demographically diverse work teams process their distributed knowledge more effectively.

In this chapter, we will discuss the effects of demographic diversity and virtual work environments on knowledge processing in teams. More specifically, we will describe when computer-mediated communication is likely to enhance knowledge processing in demographically diverse work teams and when it is not. In doing so, we hope to provide both workers and managers with a set of guidelines on how to best navigate these organizational changes.

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Virtual teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-843-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Jeff S. Margulies and Brian H. Kleiner

Examines new developments in work group design. Autonomous workgroups, also called self‐regulated work groups or self‐managing workteams, have been described as…

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2634

Abstract

Examines new developments in work group design. Autonomous work groups, also called self‐regulated work groups or self‐managing work teams, have been described as originating primarily from socio‐technical work design. The concept of autonomous work groups has also been described as a more comprehensive application of the methods employed in quality circles. Both of these examples will be shown to be inaccurate descriptions of a truly self‐managed work team. Instead, through the implementation and application of self‐managed work teams, a combination of socio‐technical design is utilized with a concept that goes far beyond that of quality circles‐empowerment. Empowerment is the idea that employees and groups can achieve higher levels of productivity, quality, and team member satisfaction through delegation of more task‐related decisions to the team. However, there are considerations in the implementation of autonomous work groups. These include development of trust, appropriate status and reward systems, senior management support, and the effective management of change. Focuses on the changes and processes that are integral parts of the successful implementation of empowerment.

Details

Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Malcolm McGreevy

The received wisdom is that team working is a good thing and is spoken about positively as a means of promoting co‐operation and of making the best use of employees'

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5019

Abstract

Purpose

The received wisdom is that team working is a good thing and is spoken about positively as a means of promoting co‐operation and of making the best use of employees' strengths. This article seeks to examine why this may be and to address the four areas highlighted by ACAS where improvements are made, i.e. productivity, quality, the use of new technology, and motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores here in the light of the current organisational environment.

Findings

The study outlines the lessons learned in introducing teamwork, the need for managerial commitment, the changes in culture that can be promoted by team working and how to go about planning for change.

Originality/value

The paper presents a practical and realistic view. This is the first of two articles on the subject. The second will deal with the issues of establishing and running teams.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Carole Serhan, Wissam Salloum and Nader Abdo

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of reward systems on team performance and analyze how satisfaction with rewards can result in better working

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of reward systems on team performance and analyze how satisfaction with rewards can result in better working performance and cohesiveness in the job environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 32 single members of different teams working in 10 selected banks from the Middle East and North Africa region.

Findings

The analysis from empirical findings reveals that there is a positive link between reward systems and team performance. More particularly, profit sharing has positive effects on team performance and collective bargaining reward systems affect significantly team cohesiveness. These links create an opportunity for employers to use reward systems as a motivating factor to direct team behavior toward more employee retention.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the teamwork performance research stream by empirically studying how rewards improve team performance and cohesiveness in Eastern contexts. Studies in such contexts are relatively rare.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Rocco Palumbo

Team autonomy involves empowering employees to achieve greater control over organizational dynamics. Such empowerment may augment the employees’ vigor, dedication and…

Abstract

Purpose

Team autonomy involves empowering employees to achieve greater control over organizational dynamics. Such empowerment may augment the employees’ vigor, dedication and absorption at work. However, there is limited evidence on the contents of the relationship between team autonomy and work engagement. This paper aims to fill in this gap, shedding light into the manifold implications of team autonomy on employees’ work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A serial mediation analysis was designed to collect evidence of the effects of team autonomy on work engagement. Drawing on self-determination theory, social comparison theory and social facilitation theory, team member-supervisor exchanges and organizational climate were contemplated in the analysis as mediating variables. An ordinary least square regression-based model relying on 5,000 bootstrap samples was implemented. The study focused on a large sample of Europeans employed in the manufacturing sector (n = 4,588).

Findings

Team autonomy had tiny, but statistically significant effects on work engagement. Good relationships between team members and supervisors positively mediated the effects of team autonomy on work engagement. Conversely, the organizational climate did not have a significant mediating role. A statistically significant serial mediation effect linked team autonomy and work engagement via team member-supervisor exchanges and organizational climate.

Practical implications

Team autonomy contributes to increasing the employees’ vigor, dedication and absorption at work. The enhancement of team member-supervisor relationships fosters the engagement of team members who experience a greater autonomy at work. The effects of team autonomy on organizational climate are ambiguous and mediated by an improvement of the relationships between team members and supervisors.

Originality/value

The paper originally investigates the implications of team autonomy on work engagement, emphasizing the importance of social exchanges at work to realize the full potential of team autonomy.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Frank Carr

Team working has widely been seen by managers as a key way of utilising employee ideas and improving performance. But how important it is depends on circumstances. This…

Abstract

Team working has widely been seen by managers as a key way of utilising employee ideas and improving performance. But how important it is depends on circumstances. This article examines its introduction into a motor assembly plant, and draws attention to the specificity of the local context. It draws on research carried out at the Vauxhall Motors Luton plant.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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