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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

James Hendrie

There has been much research carried out into the topic of labour turnover over many years. Staff who are satisfied are more likely to stay working for a business…

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6145

Abstract

There has been much research carried out into the topic of labour turnover over many years. Staff who are satisfied are more likely to stay working for a business. Research has also shown that there can be many reasons for dissatisfaction, and that they will vary in different situations. One of the main aims of this work was to carry out research into the causal effects of labour turnover at Livingston's. This was achieved in the form of a self‐completion postal questionnaire, which sought to measure staff opinions and attitudes, from a census of part‐time staff. The main drivers of turnover identified were: pay rates; lack of career development; hours of work; training; poor staff recognition; staff facilities; staffing levels; staff uniform; and communications.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2018

Rob Gandy, Patricia Harrison and Jeff Gold

Institution-wide staff turnover in universities might be considered “satisfactory”, but can mask wide counterbalancing patterns between departments and different staff

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1645

Abstract

Purpose

Institution-wide staff turnover in universities might be considered “satisfactory”, but can mask wide counterbalancing patterns between departments and different staff. This paper aims to explore the benefits of detailed turnover analysis in managing talent in the complex changing landscape of Higher Education in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Staff turnover was analysed for both new recruits and staff leaving, as well as net turnover. The inverted Nomogramma di Gandy highlighted overall patterns and outliers. Staff characteristics examined included age, gender, staff type and contractual status.

Findings

There were (wide) variations in staff turnover for age, gender and type of contract, with particularly high turnover for research staff (influenced by the use of fixed-term contracts). This disproportionately affected younger staff, who are more likely than their elders to seek employment elsewhere, but might stay if there are career opportunities and development. Practical processes are suggested to improve intelligence that enables the best talent to be identified and retained, support a life-span perspective and inform emerging issues such as gender pay differentials.

Originality/value

Given the increasing complexity of managing talent in universities, with their predominantly knowledge-type employees, the research serves to highlight that high localized staff turnover can adversely impact on a university’s research capacity, which in turn presents risks to the achievement of its strategic aims and objectives. Therefore, detailed scrutiny of staff turnover dynamics can pinpoint where recruitment and retention policies and practice require focus.

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European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Kalotina Chalkiti and Marianna Sigala

This paper aims to explore the occurrence and implications of staff turnover in the Greek tourism industry as well as looks into the current and future strategies adopted…

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6551

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the occurrence and implications of staff turnover in the Greek tourism industry as well as looks into the current and future strategies adopted by Greek enterprises for addressing this unavoidable and unpredictable phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research instrument was distributed both online as well as through e‐mails over a period of four weeks for collecting primary data from a convenience sample of Greek tourism enterprises. This process yielded 63 usable responses.

Findings

The findings revealed that the Greek tourism industry faces similar staff turnover impacts that are also found in other countries. Enterprises reported to experience similar staff turnover levels irrespective of their tourism sector, i.e. travel agents, hotels etc.; staff turnover levels were not found to be homogeneous across organizational hierarchical levels; respondents claimed that staff turnover is mainly instigated by factors that are beyond management control and that staff turnover negatively affects service quality levels, costs and time related to staff recruiting and training, while it enhances idea generation. Strategies reported to be used by the respondents for managing staff turnover demonstrate a shift from people retention strategies to knowledge retention strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The small number of responses suggests that the findings should be treated with caution. New research approaches for studying staff turnover, such as social network analysis, are recommended for future research.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the international hospitality literature by providing primary data about the level, the type and the consequences of staff turnover in the Greek tourism industry.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Robert Gandy, Patricia Harrison and Jeff Gold

Scrutiny of staff turnover in large organisations is traditionally reactive, involving benchmarking against peers at institution level. Not being an outlier tempts the…

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1007

Abstract

Purpose

Scrutiny of staff turnover in large organisations is traditionally reactive, involving benchmarking against peers at institution level. Not being an outlier tempts the inference that turnover is “satisfactory”. However, individual departments exhibiting varied, counterbalancing patterns might be masked; meaning situations that present challenges and require action could be missed. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the degree to which headline staff turnover can mask internal variations in a large post-1992 English university with over 2,000 staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The methods scrutinised related mainstream benchmarking sources, and analysed turnover for both new recruits and staff leaving, as well as net turnover. The inverted Nomogramma di Gandy helped highlight overall patterns and identify outliers. Staff categories and characteristics examined included: age, gender, diversity, staff type and contractual status.

Findings

It was found that (wide) internal variations were masked between university departments and between different gender and age groups, with Generation Y presenting issues for future recruitment and retention. Localised high turnover rates were found, with particular issues involving research staff. A proactive approach is essential, analysing local data to reflect internal structures, and staff categories and characteristics. Understanding internal and external staff dynamics supports organisations to meet strategic aims and objectives, and target local action.

Originality/value

The approach and findings provided lessons for staff management relevant to universities, which are critical to many, if not most large organisations in the UK and internationally, particularly in times of uncertainty.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2016

Paul Hanselman, Jeffrey Grigg, Sarah K. Bruch and Adam Gamoran

Staff turnover may have important consequences for the development of collective social resources based on trust, shared norms, and support among school professionals. We…

Abstract

Staff turnover may have important consequences for the development of collective social resources based on trust, shared norms, and support among school professionals. We outline the theoretical role-specific consequences of principal and teacher turnover for features of principal leadership and teacher community, and we test these ideas in repeated teacher survey data from a sample of 73 Los Angeles elementary schools. We find evidence that principal turnover fundamentally disrupts but does not systematically decrease relational qualities of principal leadership; negative changes for initially high social resource schools offset positive changes for initially low social resource schools, suggesting that relational instability “resets” the resources that develop in the relationships between leadership and teachers. Greater consistency in measures of teacher community in the face of teacher turnover implies that the social resources inhering in the relationships among teachers are more robust to instability.

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Family Environments, School Resources, and Educational Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-627-0

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Stina Sellgren, Goran Ekvall and Goran Tomson

The aim of this paper is to study the relation between leadership behaviour of nursing managers and staff turnover with respect to the intervening variables “work climate”…

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8691

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to study the relation between leadership behaviour of nursing managers and staff turnover with respect to the intervening variables “work climate” and “job satisfaction”.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different well‐documented questionnaires were used to assess perceived leadership behaviour, work climate and job satisfaction. Data on staff turnover were collected from a computerized follow‐up system. Different statistical analyses such as correlation analyses, regression analyses and analyses of variance were performed in order to explore the relations.

Findings

The results show strong correlations between leadership behaviour, work climate and job satisfaction. No significant direct relation between leadership behaviour and staff turnover was shown. Staff turnover shows statistically significant correlations with the job satisfaction variable “feeling” (p≤0.005), and the work climate variables “challenge” and “playfulness” (p≤0.001).

Practical implications

In order to limit staff turnover, decision makers should put effort into recruiting and retaining managers that perform very well according to the needs of staff. Managers that are both relations‐oriented and production‐oriented, can manage change and are able to stimulate the staff with challenges have the best opportunities to achieve low staff turnover.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge there is no study published that explores the influence of leadership behaviour, including the dimension “change”, on staff turnover in relation to intervening intrinsic factors of job satisfaction and creative work climate in nursing.

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Leadership in Health Services, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

James Griffith

In the present study, the direct effect of principal transformational leadership to school staff turnover and school performance was examined, in addition to its indirect…

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14964

Abstract

In the present study, the direct effect of principal transformational leadership to school staff turnover and school performance was examined, in addition to its indirect effect through school staff job satisfaction. Survey data were obtained from elementary school staff and students, and school‐aggregated student achievement test scores were obtained from school archives. Results showed that staff reports of principal behaviors could be described in terms of the three components of transformational leadership: inspiration or charisma, individualized consideration, and intellectual stimulation. Principal transformational leadership was not associated directly with either school staff turnover or school‐aggregated student achievement progress. Rather, principal transformational leadership showed an indirect effect, through staff job satisfaction, on school staff turnover (negative) and on school‐aggregated student achievement progress (positive). Finally, higher levels of school staff job satisfaction were associated with smaller achievement gaps between minority and non‐minority students. This result was more evident among schools having higher levels of principal transformational leadership. Results are discussed in relation to the role of transformational leadership in school performance and in recruiting, training, and evaluating school principals.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Hossam M. Abu Elanain

Previous studies on leadership quality – staff turnover relationship – have been performed mainly in Western contexts. More empirical evidence is needed to understand the…

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3159

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies on leadership quality – staff turnover relationship – have been performed mainly in Western contexts. More empirical evidence is needed to understand the nature of the relationship between the quality of leadership and staff turnover in a non-Western context in general and in the Middle East in particular. Thus, this study has two objectives: to examine the impact of leader-member exchange (LMX) on staff turnover intentions in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and to test the mediating impact of role conflict, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment on the LMX-turnover intentions relationship. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 241 employees working in 15 different service and industrial product organizations operating in Dubai. A structured questionnaire containing standard scales of LMX, role conflict, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intentions, and some demographic variables was used. After testing scales reliability and validity, the proposed hypotheses were tested using a series of separate hierarchical regression analyses.

Findings

Consistent with Western studies, the study revealed that LMX played a functional impact on staff turnover intentions. Moreover, role conflict was found to play a partial role in mediating the influence of LMX on turnover intentions. Similarly, job satisfaction and organizational commitment were found to partially mediate the relationship between LMX and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of common method variance and same source bias are discussed in light of implications for future research. Nevertheless, the results show that leaders need to monitor the quality of exchange between themselves and their followers to ensure high-quality relationships are maintained.

Practical implications

The study has implications for reducing staff turnover. In general, enhancing LMX can result in lower level of employee turnover intentions. Also, managers should improve staff job satisfaction and organizational commitment in order to enhance the impact of LMX on reducing turnover intention. In addition, UAE managers should reduce role conflict in order to improve the impact of LMX on turnover intention.

Originality/value

Previous studies on leadership quality – staff turnover relationship – have been performed mainly in Western contexts. This study is considered to be the first study to examine the mediating role of role conflict, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment on the relationship between LMX and turnover intentions in the Middle East.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

Martin Knapp, Kostas Harissis and Spyros Missiakoulis

The rate at which staff change jobs has long posed a serious problem for employers in the private and public sectors. Generally speaking, staff turnover breaks the…

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1037

Abstract

The rate at which staff change jobs has long posed a serious problem for employers in the private and public sectors. Generally speaking, staff turnover breaks the stability, consistency and continuity of work, makes long‐term planning more difficult, leads to shortages of staff which in turn can raise the workloads of other employees, and raises the costs of recruiting and training staff. Fluctuating turnover rates make long‐term manpower planning extremely difficult, and can spark off a spiralling series of staffing problems and difficulties.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2017

Grace Mubako and Tatiana Mazza

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that are associated with internal auditors’ professional turnover intentions.

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1190

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that are associated with internal auditors’ professional turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyzes data from responses to the Institute of Internal Auditors’ (IIA) (2015) Common Body of Knowledge global survey and uses a multivariate approach to identify factors that influence internal auditor turnover intentions.

Findings

Results show that internal auditor turnover intentions are negatively associated with an academic background in accounting, possessing internal audit professional certification, and having access to more training opportunities. Turnover intentions are positively associated with organizational-professional conflict, restricted access to documents and personnel, and the existence of a program of using the internal audit function as management training ground. Differences by IIA global region highlight the diversity in the turnover challenges that face the professional globally.

Originality/value

Results from this study are important because they bring attention to issues that potentially lead to internal auditors leaving the profession. This can help the profession and organizations take measures to motivate internal auditors to remain in the profession and alleviate the current staffing challenges faced by the profession.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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