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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2022

Olivene Burke and Shinique Walters

According to the UNWTO (2020), tourism is considered one of the world's major economic sectors and accounted for 7% of global trade in 2019. For countries like Jamaica…

Abstract

According to the UNWTO (2020), tourism is considered one of the world's major economic sectors and accounted for 7% of global trade in 2019. For countries like Jamaica, the tourism sector is a significant provider of jobs and services. The literature chronicles the transformation of the tourism landscape – moving beyond resorts, cruises, and tours to a more culture-centric landscape, embracing authentic and natural environments. Consequently, community-based tourism (CBT) has garnered considerable attention as a fast-growing industry that embraces the special interests of the “new tourists.” Furthermore, CBT has become a significant socioeconomic benefit for inner-city communities. However, the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted the sector, impacting the national economy and the livelihoods of informal and formal tourism workers. Additionally, CBT experienced a loss of its primary stakeholders – tourists. Preliminary engagements revealed that the loss of CBT during the pandemic had adverse effects on communities and highlighted the fragility of the current CBT framework to withstand future unknown shocks. Therefore, the sustainability of CBT requires a different approach. This study sought to explore the socioeconomic impact of COVID-19 on CBT in rural and urban communities to propose a “fit for purpose” model that can withstand adverse effects of shocks and be replicated across the Caribbean.

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2022

Ayesha Masood, Qingyu Zhang, Moazzam Ali, Giuseppe Cappiello and Amandeep Dhir

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of enterprise social media (ESM) use on two trust dimensions – affect-based trust (ABT) and cognition-based trust …

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of enterprise social media (ESM) use on two trust dimensions – affect-based trust (ABT) and cognition-based trust (CBT) – as mediators in the relationship between ESM use and knowledge sharing. In the first stage of the proposed model, the authors also consider transparent communication (TC) and personal blogging with colleagues (PBC) during work and non-work hours as moderators that reshape trust levels and subsequently promote knowledge sharing within the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected the data in three waves from employees in China, the world’s largest market for social media. Five companies, including three information technology companies and two software companies, were targeted for data collection. Initially, a total of 403 ESM users were recruited, but the final sample in the final round was reduced to N = 292. The authors used Mplus (v8.5) to calculate direct path coefficients and indirect moderated-mediation effects.

Findings

The use of ESM promotes ABT and CBT, thereby improving knowledge sharing. ABT and CBT both fully mediate the effect of ESM use on knowledge sharing. However, the research reveals paradoxical findings regarding moderation. For example, on the one hand, TC negatively moderates the association between ESM use and ABT, thereby reducing knowledge sharing in the workplace. On the other hand, TC strengthens the relationship between the use of ESM and CBT, thereby increasing knowledge sharing. These contradictory findings indicate that TC functions as a double-edged sword; thus, the effective use of ESM in the workplace requires managers’ intervention. Finally, the analysis reveals that the moderating role of PBC strengthens the association between ESM use and both ABT and CBT, thereby increasing knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

While stakeholders have expressed concern regarding the adverse impacts of workplace ESM adoption on employee performance, the authors provide a broad, novel perspective on the potential of ESM use to enhance knowledge sharing via trust (i.e. ABT and CBT). To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to offer a comparative view of trust dimensions, such as ABT and CBT, and to discuss how, why and when TC and PBC interactions moderate the relationship of ESM to ABT and CBT and thereby lead to knowledge sharing. These interesting findings guide further research into the role of ESM in the workplace, especially research based on rational choice theory and communication visibility theory, by illuminating the ways in which employees can use ESM to reshape social communication in the workplace and thereby enhance knowledge sharing.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Lourah M. Kelly, Cory A. Crane, Kristyn Zajac and Caroline J. Easton

Past studies demonstrated the efficacy of integrated cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorder (SUD) and intimate partner violence (IPV) as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

Past studies demonstrated the efficacy of integrated cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorder (SUD) and intimate partner violence (IPV) as well as high rates of depressive symptoms in this population. However, little is known about how depressive symptoms impact treatment outcomes. The authors hypothesized that integrated CBT, but not standard drug counseling (DC), would buffer the negative effects of depressive symptoms on treatment response.

Design/methodology/approach

A secondary analysis of a randomized trial compared men assigned to 12 weeks of integrated CBT for SUD and IPV (n = 29) to those in DC (n = 34).

Findings

Most (60%) of the sample reported any depressive symptoms. Controlling for baseline IPV, reporting any depressive symptoms was associated with more positive cocaine screens during treatment. Among men with depressive symptoms, integrated CBT but not DC was associated with fewer positive cocaine screens. Controlling for baseline alcohol variables, integrated CBT and depressive symptoms were each associated with less aggression outside of intimate relationships (family, strangers, etc.) during treatment. For men without depressive symptoms, integrated CBT was associated with less non-IPV aggression compared to DC. Effects were not significant for other substances, IPV, or at follow-up.

Research limitations/implications

This study found some evidence for differential response to CBT by depressive symptoms on cocaine and aggression at end of treatment, which did not persist three months later. Future studies should explore mechanisms of integrated CBT for SUD and IPV, including mood regulation, on depressive symptoms in real-world samples.

Practical implications

Integrated CBT buffered depressive symptoms’ impact on cocaine use, yet only improved non-IPV aggression in men without depressive symptoms.

Originality/value

Although integrated CBT’s efficacy for improving SUD and IPV has been established, moderators of treatment response have not been investigated.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Elizabeth Koschmann, James L. Abelson, Amy M. Kilbourne, Shawna N. Smith, Kate Fitzgerald and Anna Pasternak

Mood and anxiety disorders affect 20–30 percent of school-age children, contributing to academic failure, substance abuse, and adult psychopathology, with immense social…

Abstract

Purpose

Mood and anxiety disorders affect 20–30 percent of school-age children, contributing to academic failure, substance abuse, and adult psychopathology, with immense social and economic impact. These disorders are treatable, but only a fraction of students in need have access to evidence-based treatment practices (EBPs). Access could be substantially increased if school professionals were trained to identify students at risk and deliver EBPs in the context of school-based support services. However, current training for school professionals is largely ineffective because it lacks follow-up supported practice, an essential element for producing lasting behavioral change. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this pilot feasibility study, the authors explored whether a coaching-based implementation strategy could be used to integrate common elements of evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) into schools. The strategy incorporated didactic training in CBT for school professionals followed by coaching from an expert during co-facilitation of CBT groups offered to students.

Findings

In total, 17 school professionals in nine high schools with significant cultural and socioe-conomic diversity participated, serving 105 students. School professionals were assessed for changes in confidence in CBT delivery, frequency of generalized use of CBT skills and attitudes about the utility of CBT for the school setting. Students were assessed for symptom improvement. The school professionals showed increased confidence in, utilization of, and attitudes toward CBT. Student participants showed significant reductions in depression and anxiety symptoms pre- to post-group.

Originality/value

These findings support the feasibility and potential impact of a coaching-based implementation strategy for school settings, as well as student symptom improvement associated with receipt of school-delivered CBT.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Vikneswaran Nair and Amran Hamzah

The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the long-term viability of community-based tourism (CBT) as a development tool in rural tourism, and how…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a better understanding of the long-term viability of community-based tourism (CBT) as a development tool in rural tourism, and how the best practice from the Asia Pacific region can be used to strategize the nine-stage plan to develop and sustain it in the long term.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is formulated using a case study approach based on the lessons learned and the best practices in ten member economies of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Forum, namely, Australia, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, the Philippines and Vietnam.

Findings

Based on the analyses of the ten case studies, the paper recommends nine steps for developing and sustaining CBT. These nine steps are divided into two sections – developing CBT and sustaining CBT. The first four steps relate to starting and developing CBT initiatives, which are useful for projects and sites that are embarking on CBT. The subsequent five steps are meant to address the sustainability of CBT projects, which are more appropriate for mature CBT projects that are gradually moving up the value chain. The nine steps are presented in detail and supported by the models developed from the case studies. For each step, a list of actions is recommended to guide the development of CBT.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited by the ten case studies selected by the researcher. The conditions for these selected case studies may not be identical in other locations, and thus, the proposed nine-step framework can be used only as a guide. Each step outlined may vary from one nation to another.

Originality/value

The main output of this paper is designed to provide guidance for tourism/rural planners, non-government organizations (NGOs), industry players and CBT organizations in deciding whether tourism could work for a particular community and if it is feasible to be sustained over the long term.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Osamu Kobori, Michiko Nakazato, Naoki Yoshinaga, Tetsuya Shiraishi, Kota Takaoka, Akiko Nakagawa, Masaomi Iyo and Eiji Shimizu

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the implementation and evaluation of a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) training course for clinicians in Chiba, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the implementation and evaluation of a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) training course for clinicians in Chiba, the sixth-largest province in Japan.

Design/methodology/approach

Individual CBT for obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia nervosa, or social anxiety disorder was delivered by trainees of the Chiba CBT training course in a single study design.

Findings

The results demonstrated that individual CBT delivered by trainees led to statistically significant reductions in symptom severity for all three disorders. Feedback from the trainees indicated that the training course achieved its aims.

Research limitations/implications

Barriers to the dissemination of CBT in Japan such as opportunities for training and possible solutions are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates the Chiba CBT training course, which is a Japanese adaptation of the UK Improving Access to Psychological Therapies Project and the first post-qualification CBT training course in Japan.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Richard Holden

Discusses Marks & Spencer′s application of computer‐basedtraining (CBT) in training its food supervisors. CBT is used to enhancethe transfer of learning following training…

Abstract

Discusses Marks & Spencer′s application of computer‐based training (CBT) in training its food supervisors. CBT is used to enhance the transfer of learning following training input using workbooks. Argues that the particular application is a very powerful and effective use of CBT, illustrating the real potential of CBT when integrated with other training techniques. Reflects on how such an application may assist in the development of CBT more generally.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2020

Kinga Xénia Havadi Nagy and Ana Espinosa Segui

The purpose of this paper is to analyse community-based tourism (CBT) initiatives in the post-socialist rural Romania in terms of the holism of the tourist project and the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse community-based tourism (CBT) initiatives in the post-socialist rural Romania in terms of the holism of the tourist project and the implementation of the local participation. The paper focusses on chances and challenges of CBT.

Design/methodology/approach

Once the main objective was established, three research interests arose: How and why tourism played a significant role in the economic and social development of the rural local community? How has the local community participated in the starting and maintenance of the CBT projects and who played a key part? How can the level of success of the CBT implementations be qualitatively measured? Qualitative methodologies (interviews, on-site observations, informal discussions) were applied to survey the four case studies.

Findings

Natural and cultural features ensure a versatile potential for touristic exploitation of the Romanian rural area, but the villages are endangered by post-socialist economic and social transformations. Innovative approaches of CBT in rural areas ignited by charismatic leaders with entrepreneurial spirit develop based on the existent social, natural and cultural capital, but on the other hand, endeavours can be vulnerable because of hindering local municipalities or sustainability issues.

Practical implications

The findings facilitate recommendations in favour of effective CBT ventures.

Originality/value

Learning about the contribution of CBT to a sustainable development of rural regions with no/little tradition of private entrepreneurship can contribute to the revitalization of rural areas facing post-socialist challenges.

Details

Journal of Tourism Analysis: Revista de Análisis Turístico, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2254-0644

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Laura Jane Hancox, David M. Gresswell and Danielle De Boos

This paper aims to address how one Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (DClinPsy) programme contributes to the shaping of attitudes of its trainee clinical psychologists…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address how one Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (DClinPsy) programme contributes to the shaping of attitudes of its trainee clinical psychologists (TCPs) towards cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 28 TCPs completed an online, mixed-methods questionnaire relating to their attitudes towards CBT, what factors had influenced their attitude and how competent they felt in applying CBT to clinical practice.

Findings

The majority of respondents reported a positive attitude towards CBT. There was a statistically significant positive change at an individual level in TCPs’ views of CBT between the point at which they applied for the DClinPsy and the present day. Thematic analysis of qualitative data identified influential factors on the development of TCP attitudes towards CBT. The vast majority of TCPs reported that they felt competent applying CBT in their clinical practice.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, the DClinPsy has a positive effect on TCPs’ attitudes towards CBT. However, the influence of placements has a more mixed effect on attitudes. A small sample size reduced the reliability of these conclusions. Recommendations for further evaluation have been made.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates the effect of a DClinPsy programme on TCPs’ attitudes towards CBT. The value is that it establishes which components of the course have different effects on trainee attitudes.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2017

Arch G. Woodside

Consumer behavior in tourism (CBT) is an interdisciplinary field of study encompassing the basic behavioral and economic sciences (e.g., psychology, sociology, and…

Abstract

Consumer behavior in tourism (CBT) is an interdisciplinary field of study encompassing the basic behavioral and economic sciences (e.g., psychology, sociology, and economics) and applied fields of study (e.g., management, marketing, tourism, and hospitality) focusing on all aspects of discretionary travel. This chapter describes major issues and findings in the literature relating to CBT. The chapter directs the reader’s attention to some of the highly-cited studies in this literature – these studies provide a foundation of knowledge on the central topics, issues, methods, findings, and theoretical/practical contributions in research on CBT. Research studies in CBT focus on one-to-all five core theoretical issues in basic and applied fields of study: describe who is doing what, when, where, how, and the consequences of the activities; explain the meanings of activities and motivations of the actors; predict (model) what actions and outcomes will occur and the impacts of influence attempts before, during, and after engaging in tourist actions; control (influence) the beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, and assessments of tourists, local community members, and additional stakeholders; evaluate tourism service/product delivery, tourism management performance, and customer satisfaction. Survey research using verbal (written) responses to questions is pervasive and the most frequent method for data collection in CBT. Additional research genres in CBT include direct observations of tourism behavior with or without some oral questioning (unobtrusive studies, the long interview method (McCracken, 1988), use of “consumer culture theory”), participant observation including semester abroad and unpaid internships away from home, formal field experiments, and the study of secondary sources (e.g., photographs and writings in blogs and social media (e.g., TripAdvisor) reviews).

Details

Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-690-7

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000