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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Oscar Espinoza, Luis González, Luis Sandoval, Noel McGinn, Javier Loyola and Dante Castillo

The purpose of this paper is to improve future teacher training by assessment of university graduatessatisfaction with their preparation in Basic Education teaching.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve future teacher training by assessment of university graduatessatisfaction with their preparation in Basic Education teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study employed a self-administered survey questionnaire to a representative sample of 235 graduates between 2014 and 2016 from three universities in Chile. The questionnaire generated information about the graduates’ background (age, gender, parents’ education and prestige of secondary school attended); an evaluation of three dimensions of their degree program (instructional quality, infrastructure and employability), and experiences in the labor market (including salary). Analysis of variance was used to assess relationships between satisfaction, and other variables.

Findings

In general, graduates were satisfied with all aspects of their training. Satisfaction levels were higher from those assumed to have lower expectations. Contrary to this hypothesis, university prestige is not directly related to satisfaction. Instead, expectations and employability moderate the effect of prestige.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is not representative of the 59 universities in Chile nor of the many other degree programs offered in those universities.

Practical implications

Program directors concerned about improving the public reputation or prestige of their program will benefit from efforts to improve the quality of the program and its infrastructure, and relevance for entrance into the world of work.

Originality/value

This study provides information not previously available about graduate satisfaction in teaching degree programs in Chile.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Abdel-Aziz Ahmad Sharabati, Mohammad M. Alhileh and Hesham Abusaimeh

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of service quality on graduatessatisfaction as perceived by Middle East University (MEU) graduates.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of service quality on graduatessatisfaction as perceived by Middle East University (MEU) graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is cross-sectional and aims to explore the effect of service quality dimensions (academic staff, administration, classrooms and library services) on graduatessatisfaction. Data were collected from 399 graduates. After confirming validity, reliability and normality of the data, and the correlation between variables, multiple regressions were used to test the hypothesis.

Findings

The results show that all service quality dimensions are highly implemented by the MEU. The relationships between all service quality dimensions and graduatessatisfaction are strong. Finally, results show that all service quality dimensions affect graduatessatisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

To generalize the results of this research, further studies are recommended to be carried out on other universities especially in Jordan. Testing the perception and satisfaction of other universities, stakeholders will help to improve service quality and to gain suitable competitive strategies.

Practical implications

Service quality is a key driver for universities’ sustainable competitive advantage; therefore, dimensions of service quality should be included within universities plan, strategies and daily activities.

Social implications

Considering service quality in higher education improves countries’ economic development, quality of life and well-being. All corporate social responsibility pillars (social, economic, environmental responsibilities and national and international regulation and norms) should be adapted and adopted within services quality systems and programs.

Originality/value

Most of previous studies were carried out to test the students’ perception while this research is dedicated to explore graduates’ perception regarding service quality offered by the MEU.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Mazuki Jusoh, Maimun Simun and Siong Choy Chong

The aim of this research is to attempt to reveal the difference between what fresh graduates expect and their actual experiences pertaining to the working environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to attempt to reveal the difference between what fresh graduates expect and their actual experiences pertaining to the working environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a set of self‐administered questionnaires, data were collected from 128 graduates. They were asked to indicate their preferences on organizational culture, leadership, communication, decision making, team working, motivation, and development. Using the same dimensions, the respondents then reported their actual experiences, thus enabling gaps to be determined.

Findings

The results from paired‐sample t‐tests suggest that significant expectation gaps exist in all the areas surveyed. While communication, decision making and motivation are found to be significantly related to job satisfaction, none of the seven variables is found to be significantly correlated to organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses only on a rather limited sample size of Malaysian graduates; therefore it cannot ensure generalization of results obtained.

Practical implications

The resulting expectation gaps, and their influence on the graduates' job satisfaction and organizational commitment, have implications for the important roles played by employers, higher learning institutions, and graduate themselves.

Originality/value

This study makes significant contributions in three key areas. First, it is perhaps one of the earliest studies to comprehensively address the issue of expectation gaps using a myriad factors. Second, it is also one of the few that examines the influence of the expectation gaps on job satisfaction and commitment. Third, instead of focusing on employees as a whole, which has been the practice of prior research, this study concentrates only on fresh graduates who have been in the workforce for less than two years.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Vichet Sam

Education-job mismatches, especially overeducation or vertical mismatch, are generally found to lower the worker’s job satisfaction, which may generate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Education-job mismatches, especially overeducation or vertical mismatch, are generally found to lower the worker’s job satisfaction, which may generate the counter-productive behaviors, such as high rates of absenteeism and turnover in developed countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of educational mismatches from their both forms and dimensions (match, overeducation, horizontal mismatch and double mismatch) on the job satisfaction among university graduates in Cambodia.

Design/methodology/approach

To deal with the sample selection bias owing to the unobserved job satisfaction of unemployed graduates, this paper applies the Heckman probit model on a survey conducted with 19 higher education institutions in Cambodia.

Findings

Results indicate that a half of graduates suffer at least one type of educational mismatch and the both forms of mismatches adversely affect the job satisfaction with the strongest impact from the double mismatch case.

Research limitations/implications

The authors take into account the sample selection bias, but are not able to deal with the unobserved heterogeneity, such as individual competences and preferences. With the panel data, it would be possible to isolate those individual fixed effects.

Practical implications

The findings underline the importance of improvement in the quality of higher education in Cambodia that seems to play a main role in this education-job mismatch problem. Creating the occupational counseling for the high school students would be also helpful to orientate students to the majors strongly needed by the labor market.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on all forms and dimensions of mismatches and takes into account the sample selection bias in the context of a low-income country where the increasing rate of enrollment in higher education seems to be accompanied by an increasing rate of education-job mismatches. Previous research works focused mostly on overeducation and in developed countries.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Edel McDermott, John Mangan and Marion O'Connor

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceived progress of graduates who have been recruited by organisations and to assess their expectations and corresponding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceived progress of graduates who have been recruited by organisations and to assess their expectations and corresponding satisfaction levels. Drawing on the psychological contract and graduate development literature, the objective of the study was to compare the opinions of graduates from an organisation that offers a graduate development programme (GDP) to graduates from an organisation that does not offer such a programme.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper there are interviews with HR managers, coupled with the design and distribution of a questionnaire to 126 graduates in two organisations with a response rate of 71 per cent (89 completed questionnaires).

Findings

Interesting findings emerged from the research that suggest that while GDPs do have merit, they do not appear to result in graduates who are more satisfied. In fact the opposite appeared to be true. From the sample, it emerged that organisations that employ these programmes have graduates who are less satisfied than their counterparts in organisations with no such programmes.

Practical implications

A number of practical implications and recommendations were identified from the study, including the importance of monitoring graduate expectations and satisfaction levels, introducing short‐term development plans, re‐evaluating the terms of reference of the GDP and providing specific training for supervisors/managers of graduates. To ensure that GDPs play a positive part in ensuring the organisational commitment of the graduate, they must be carefully developed and managed.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into satisfaction levels regarding GDPs.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Vangelis Kotsifos, Athanasios Alegakis and Anastas Philalithis

The object of this study is to formulate, establish and apply a suitable and reliable tool for measuring the course experience satisfaction of Master graduates. A…

Abstract

Purpose

The object of this study is to formulate, establish and apply a suitable and reliable tool for measuring the course experience satisfaction of Master graduates. A questionnaire was formulated, based on similar tools, and adjusted to the reality of Hellenic Higher Education, in order to measure the satisfaction of graduates in three Master programmes in the area of health care management.

Design/methodology/approach

Master graduates of the study (n=162), 2003‐2007 admission years, filled in the questionnaire either electronically (web‐based) or by phone interview. The overall response rate was 50.6 per cent. In total, 37 statements were used for the measure of satisfaction while other questionnaire parts recorded the demographic, occupational and educational characteristics of the graduates.

Findings

Analysis revealed seven factors, listed as teaching, skills, assessment, feedback, social opportunities, facilities and organization of the course. Gender and first degree content do not affect the produced total satisfaction score. Married participants scored higher than those that are single in three factors and older participants scored higher than younger ones in two factors. The University of Crete's graduates scored higher than other graduates in two factors.

Originality/value

The paper is the first attempt to assess satisfaction, based on the grounds of quality, for Master programs in Hellenic State Universities. In this study are presented the first results and conclusions of the application of the developed questionnaire. Further results, relative to graduates' occupational status changes and professional development, are currently under investigation.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Maximus Gorky Sembiring and Gayuh Rahayu

Service quality and satisfaction in the ODL setting related to students’ accomplishments (performance, loyalty and career) were reconsidered. It was aimed at exposing the…

Abstract

Purpose

Service quality and satisfaction in the ODL setting related to students’ accomplishments (performance, loyalty and career) were reconsidered. It was aimed at exposing the moderating role of satisfaction on service quality and accomplishment. It was also of interest to scrutinize how, in what routines determinants engaged interdepended. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized an exploratory design. It was qualitatively identified first that service quality included tangible, empathy, assurance, reliability, responsiveness and referral factors. It preceded to satisfaction (perceived from academic, operational and managerial attitudes). Satisfaction led to accomplishment. Quantitatively, service quality, satisfaction and accomplishment were identified as independent, moderating, and dependent variables, respectively. Respondents, 500 Universitas Terbuka graduates, were randomly pursued to accumulate data by a survey. Methodically, importance-performance analysis (IPA) and customer-satisfaction index (CSI) were used to figure out satisfaction and their importance degree. Nine hypotheses were developed and examined using structural-equation modeling to visualize the loading factors.

Findings

Replies from 163 respondents were completed. Seven of nine hypotheses were validated. It was distinguished that reliability influencing satisfaction, they were empathy, assurance and responsiveness; excluding tangible and referral. Satisfaction influenced performance, career, and loyalty. IPA-CSI analysis recognized 15 (of 21) attributes as the pillars of service quality.

Originality/value

Despite the qualitative framework was improperly approved by quantitative procedure, they were methodically reliable. It was supported by the fact that nine cut-off values of goodness-of-fit requirements harmonized. Additional inquiry is therefore required to tail off variances by integrating a more appropriate approach, amplifying theoretical coverage, and/or extending population/sample size.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Tomasz Gajderowicz, Gabriela Grotkowska and Leszek Wincenciak

– The purpose of this paper is to address the problem of job satisfaction determinants of higher education graduates across six selected study domains.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the problem of job satisfaction determinants of higher education graduates across six selected study domains.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theoretical considerations, derived from human capital theory and signalling theory, the authors formulate the model explaining job satisfaction as a broad measure of labour market success. Explanatory variables include various socio-demographic characteristics as well as market environment and process of learning, modes of teaching and study programme characteristics. Data used in the analysis comes from two special surveys of European research projects REFLEX and HEGESCO. Principal component analysis method and OLS regression were used to estimate model parameters.

Findings

The results of our research show the important role of characteristics of educational process, as well as individual graduates’ early work-related experience in predicting job satisfaction. Differences in job satisfaction determinants across domains may be to some extent explained by the differences in the labour market characteristics for graduates in given discipline. Variety of education-related characteristics taken into account in the empirical analysis of determinants of job satisfaction is a key valuable contribution to the research in the field.

Originality/value

Research findings indicate the areas of potential actions aimed at improving future job satisfaction which can be undertaken by higher education institutions’ management bodies.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Vathsala Wickramasinghe

This study aims to investigate the level of job satisfaction experienced by IT graduates employed full time in offshore outsourced IT firms (OOITF) in Sri Lanka, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the level of job satisfaction experienced by IT graduates employed full time in offshore outsourced IT firms (OOITF) in Sri Lanka, the demographic characteristics that predict job satisfaction, perceptions towards IT jobs in OOITF, and turnover and job search intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 122 randomly selected individuals who graduated in the information technology field and were employed full‐time in OOITF in Sri Lanka. A survey questionnaire was chosen as the mode for data collection.

Findings

The results indicate that gender and tenure are significant in job satisfaction measurement. Females are less satisfied with their jobs and feel a loss of interest in IT jobs in OOITF but wish to remain in their present workplace. IT graduates with a longer tenure in their present workplace are less satisfied with their jobs, feel a loss of interest in IT jobs in OOITF and intend to leave their present workplace.

Originality/value

The majority of job satisfaction studies on IT personnel have been undertaken primarily in the West. The extent to which the research findings of those studies could be generalised to the South Asian offshore outsourcing context has not been widely tested.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Giovanna Boccuzzo, Luigi Fabbris and Omar Paccagnella

The purpose of this paper is to study how graduates’ jobs may be determined by their educational performances and social background. In particular, the authors investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how graduates’ jobs may be determined by their educational performances and social background. In particular, the authors investigate job-education mismatch and job satisfaction to evaluate whether time spent and effort exerted during university studies were compensated with a good job.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on the occupational status of the graduates 36 months after graduation, collected by the Padua University on its graduates, are analysed by means of univariate and multivariate methodologies. In particular, the pathways from graduates’ social capital to job satisfaction are investigated through a structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

The authors find that a minority of graduates can be considered as overeducated when considering the requirements of the labour market, but many graduates state that any degree would suffice for their job. Multivariate analyses show that graduates’ job quality is related to their university choice and outcome, high school choice and performance, social capital. Destiny is written from the beginning of the educational pathway, but students can affect their labour market future with an appropriate choice of university programme.

Originality/value

The qualified point of this paper lies on the complexity of the model adopted for the analysis and its ability to highlight direct and indirect effects: two job outcomes (job-major match and job satisfaction) are the variables of interest, analysed within a structural model covering all educational stages of the Italian educational pathway, from parental social background to university degree.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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