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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

L. Michelle Bobbitt and Pratibha A. Dabholkar

Technology‐based self‐service is growing at a tremendous rate all over the world, but a strong unifying theory to understand this form of service is lacking. Proposes a…

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10443

Abstract

Technology‐based self‐service is growing at a tremendous rate all over the world, but a strong unifying theory to understand this form of service is lacking. Proposes a comprehensive conceptual framework that incorporates several well‐known attitudinal theories to explain the pivotal role of attitudes in influencing intentions and behavior related to technology‐based self‐service. The framework makes it possible to understand and predict better consumer decisions related to using technology‐based self‐service by thoroughly examining underlying consumer attitudes. Uses the Internet to illustrate how our framework can be applied to study consumer behavior related to a specific technology‐based self‐service. Draws on insights from the extant literature on technology‐based self‐service and also incorporates the many unique characteristics of the Internet that have implications for theory. Discusses practical implications of our model for marketers and provides directions for future research on technology‐based self‐service in general and the Internet in particular. With its integrative approach to theory, also contributes to the attitudinal literature.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Joel E. Collier, Daniel L. Sherrell, Emin Babakus and Alisha Blakeney Horky

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential differences between types of self-service technology. Specifically, the paper explores how the dynamics of public and…

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2381

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential differences between types of self-service technology. Specifically, the paper explores how the dynamics of public and private self-service technology influence customers' decision to use the technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing customers of private and public self-service technology were surveyed from the same industry. Using structural equation modeling, the authors examine how relevant self-service constructs influence evaluations and attitudes of customers across both settings.

Findings

The analysis reveals that customers' control and convenience perceptions differ across public and private self-service technology. Additionally, customers placed a heavier emphasis on the hedonic or utilitarian evaluation of a service experience based on the type of self-service technology.

Practical implications

For managers of self-service applications, understanding the unique differences of public and private self-service technology can aid in the implementation and adoption of the technology. By properly understanding the differences of the self-service types, managers can provide a beneficial experience to the customer.

Originality/value

By identifying and describing two distinct categories of SSTs, this study allows managers and researchers to better understand how and why individuals choose to utilize individual self-service technologies. Through understanding the unique dynamics of a public and a private SST experience, retailers can determine the appropriate strategy for customer adoption based on the utilitarian or hedonic functions of the technology.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Jungkun Park, Dongyoup Kim and Hyowon Hyun

The purpose of this study is to investigate the evaluation of desirability/feasibility and adoption intention for the self-service technology of “older” consumers. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the evaluation of desirability/feasibility and adoption intention for the self-service technology of “older” consumers. This study also aims to show that the evaluation of desirability/feasibility and adoption intention varies depending on the type of customer value provided by self-service technology. Moreover, the authors improve the understanding of “older” consumers by comparing the adoption behavior through three proxies that express consumer aging: chronological age, subjective age and future time perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was performed as an experimental design by manipulating advertisement messages of self-service technology for online grocery shopping according to customer values. There are two analytic methods applied in this study. First, the current study compares the effects of chronological age, subjective age and the future time perspective on the evaluation and adoption intention of self-service technology by using structural equation modeling. Second, this study examines the moderation effect of customer values by conducting a multi-group analysis.

Findings

The results of current research indicate that the future time perspective explains participants’ evaluation and adoption intention of self-service technology compared to chronological age and subjective age. Specifically, participants who perceive their future time to be limited, rather than expansive, negatively assess the expected desirability and feasibility of self-service technology. In addition, the results of the moderation test show that the future time perspective affects more significantly the evaluation and adoption intention of self-service technology when the functional value is emphasized rather than emotional or social value.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study showed that the effect of future time perspective on expected desirability and feasibility was almost significant in each sub-dimension, but there were relatively few factors influencing trial intention. In this respect, it is necessary to look into the impact of the details of desirability and feasibility along with other variables known to influence the adoption of self-service technology related to aging. It would be meaningful to find and operationalize items that are valid for older consumers, rather than the desirability and feasibility elements typically applied to self-service technology.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the extension of the socioemotional selectivity theory that has been suggested to interpret older consumers’ behaviors. This research applies the concept of future time perspective to the assessment of desirability and feasibility and adoption intention. At the same time, for the marketing managers, the comparison between proxies that represent aging proposes the ways to attract “older” consumers with appropriate emphasis on customer values.

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Petranka Kelly, Jennifer Lawlor and Michael Mulvey

Purpose: The development of service automation continues to underpin the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors providing benefits for both customers and service…

Abstract

Purpose: The development of service automation continues to underpin the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors providing benefits for both customers and service companies. The purpose of this chapter is to showcase the practice of self-service technology (SST) usage in the contemporary tourism and hospitality sectors and present a conceptual framework of customer SST adoption.

Design/Methodology/Approach: This chapter offers an examination of theory, research and practice in relation to SST usage in tourism, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks arising for both customers and service providers. Since the benefits are achieved only if SSTs gain effective adoption with customers, this chapter focuses on concepts underpinning the study of customer SST adoption. Drawing on SST adoption factors and SST customer roles, a conceptual framework of SST adoption is discussed.

Findings/Practical Implications: This chapter examines the principles and practice underpinning the usage of self-service technologies in the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors, with specific reference to customer SST roles in co-creation. The customer SST roles provide a more detailed and nuanced picture of the customer perspective on SST usage. These nuanced roles are captured in a conceptual framework which seeks to further refine the understanding of customer SST adoption.

Research Implications & Originality/Value: The framework provides a useful foundation for further research with a focus on customer empowerment in SSTs. The future development of service automation will require a balance between the delivery of a personalised and smarter customer experience and technology applications that are unobtrusive and which do not pose any ethical or privacy concerns.

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Kanika Gupta and Sanjay Sharma

The advent of technology has played a crucial role in changing the landscape of the hospitality sector. One such technology is the adoption and installation of kiosks in…

Abstract

Purpose

The advent of technology has played a crucial role in changing the landscape of the hospitality sector. One such technology is the adoption and installation of kiosks in hotels. While some of the hotels have adopted and installed kiosks for self-services, the other hotels are still not very comfortable with the idea of self-service. This paper aims to explore the possibilities, challenges and issues that hoteliers face while dealing with self-service kiosks, it further investigates the customer’s perspective and its benefits to the end-user.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has assimilated data from hotel managers and executives that have deployed kiosks. This study involved the collection of primary data through structured interviews. Eight different hotels from the UK and India have been compared and analyzed to formulate subcategories to answer the research questions. A total of 200 customers from both the countries were approached to get the primary data; the customers were from the same hotel where the hotel executives and managers were interviewed.

Findings

The customers accepted Kiosks as easy to use, fast to run, fun to operate, but, lacking human interaction and counter language issues were simultaneously discussed. Kiosks have been emerging as self-service technologies in hotels and play a key role in reducing bottlenecks in hotel operations. The technology anxiety and counter service argument is merely a transition phase that will fade away gradually. However, the financial feasibility and the level of adoption depend upon the level of operations and the demographic characteristics of customers.

Research limitations/implications

The dependence of data from the person interviewed and their biases for answers, along with the trust and credibility of the data available online remain the biggest challenge. Increasing the sample size and more participation from different hotels would have made the study even more useful.

Originality/value

The research seeks to eliminate the gap in research by studying both the hotels' and the customers' perspective toward kiosks deployment in hotels. The results of the study would highlight the potential challenges being faced by hotel operations and opportunities they perceive in kiosks installation, therefore the results are very useful for hotels, hoteliers, academicians and students pursuing a career in the hospitality sector.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Miyoung Kim and Hailin Qu

The purpose of this study is to propose a refined technology acceptance model (TAM) to examine the relationship between factors that affect travelers' use of hotel…

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6215

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose a refined technology acceptance model (TAM) to examine the relationship between factors that affect travelers' use of hotel self-service kiosks.

Design/methodology/approach

The target population of the study is domestic travelers whose e-mail addresses are in a publicly available database. The measures in this study were developed based on a thorough review of the previous literature. A self-administered questionnaire was developed and distributed through online, and a structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis was conducted by LISREL 8.0 to test the proposed extended technology acceptance model (TAM).

Findings

Results suggested that all external variables (i.e. perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, compatibility, and perceived risks) have significant direct effects on travelers' attitude toward using hotel self-service kiosks. However, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use did not have significant effects on travelers' satisfaction. Specifically, compatibility was the most important factor that influences travelers' attitude toward using hotel self-service kiosks, followed by perceived ease of use. Further, perceived risks have a significant influence on travelers' satisfaction, followed by compatibility.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides guidance which will be useful to hotel managers and marketers seeking to improve travelers' acceptance of hotel self-service kiosks when utilizing these in their service delivery as well as to manage travelers' satisfaction of their experience with hotel self-service kiosks.

Originality/value

The new refined model of factors affecting travelers' use of hotel self-service kiosks comprises three new factors, including compatibility, perceived risks, and satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2018

Yuangao Chen, Jing Yu, Shuiqing Yang and June Wei

Online retailers widely use self-service parcel delivery as a solution to the last-mile logistics problems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that…

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2984

Abstract

Purpose

Online retailers widely use self-service parcel delivery as a solution to the last-mile logistics problems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that affect the consumer’s intention to use self-service parcel delivery service.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors integrate prior research and propose a comprehensive three-factor model. The study combines individual and situational factors and proposes a socialized factor.

Findings

This study found that location convenience, optimism, innovation, and the need for human interaction positively affect the consumer’s intention to avail of the self-service parcel delivery service. It also identifies that socialized factor positively influences the consumer’s intention to use self-service parcel delivery services.

Research limitations/implications

The test results show that the explanatory power of the individual factors of the model is better than that of the situational factors. However, this does not imply that the situational factors cannot explain the consumer behavior well. Future studies should employ additional situational factors to explain the consumer behavior.

Practical implications

This study offers valuable theoretical and managerial implications. Delivery service providers should concentrate on their marketing force and customize their services for consumer groups who have specific individual characteristics, such as optimism and innovation.

Social implications

Strengthening service interactions in the social factor and choosing optimal locations for self-service pickup machines are also essential for the expansion of the users’ population and enhancement of service experience.

Originality/value

The authors combined situational and individual factors, proposed a socialized factor, and presented the three-factor model of the consumer’s intention to use self-service parcel delivery service.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Pratibha A. Dabholkar, L. Michelle Bobbitt and Eun‐Ju Lee

Self‐scanning technology is being tested by major supermarket chains as well as other types of retailers across the world, but the success of the new technology from the…

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19212

Abstract

Self‐scanning technology is being tested by major supermarket chains as well as other types of retailers across the world, but the success of the new technology from the consumer’s perspective is not yet clear. This study investigates consumer reasons for both using and avoiding self‐scanning checkouts with a view to addressing these practitioner issues. In addition, the study advances theory on consumer motivation and behavior related to technology‐based self‐service in general. Factors driving preference or avoidance of self‐scanning checkouts include attributes of self‐scanners, consumer differences, and situational influences. Reasons for preference of other types of technology‐based self‐service over traditional service alternatives are also explored to determine motivational and behavioral patterns across service contexts. A combination of research methods is used to investigate these issues and offers richer findings than any one method used alone. Implications are discussed for managerial strategy as well as for future research.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2020

Alireza Pooya, Mehran Abed Khorasani and Simin Gholamian Ghouzhdi

This study aims to measure the effect of customers’ technology readiness and the quality of electronic services on customer satisfaction.

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1427

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to measure the effect of customers’ technology readiness and the quality of electronic services on customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The statistical sample included 410 respondents from 24 branches of a private bank. The sampling method was questionnaire. Because of the structural and organizational similarity of private banks and the elimination of nuisance variables, a bank with the most branches and customers has been selected. To test the model, equation modeling was performed to test the hypotheses. Data were collected through a self-developed structured questionnaire, which served as the measurement tool as well.

Findings

The results of the study showed that technology readiness has a significant and positive effect on customer satisfaction through the quality of self-service. Moreover, the intermediate role of perceived value in this regard was confirmed; however, the role of trust was not confirmed.

Originality/value

Previous studies have considered technology readiness as an effective factor in the quality of self-service and customer satisfaction. In this study, apart from quality of service in self-service banking and customer satisfaction, two variables of trust and perceived value have been investigated. An attempt has also been made to address some questions, including “what the effect of customer technology readiness on perceived value of self-services as well as customer satisfaction is?” and “how it is possible to improve self-service quality in modern banking based on customer expectations?” or “what effects variables such as trust and perceived value have on customer satisfaction?” Having a glance at the studies done before, it can be understood that so far, there has been no study done using a mixture of these variables, yet societies’ demands for self-service operations grow day by day. It is, therefore, mandatory to study the prerequisites associated with any actions before one is taken. The paper contributes in the following way: trust and perceived value are added to the the study because of their role in customer satisfaction. In addition, for the first time, variables have been studied, which had never been under focus in any studies in developing countries before.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Ruomeng Wu, Meng Liu and Frank Kardes

This paper aims to investigate the effect of chronological age on the likelihood to choose a service provider with technological machines versus humans in the context of services.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of chronological age on the likelihood to choose a service provider with technological machines versus humans in the context of services.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experimental studies were used to collect data. In both experiments, scripts were devised to depict a food ordering situation. The studies, each of which represents two between-subject conditions, were presented to a total of 312 participants.

Findings

The results of studies show that as age increases, consumers show a higher visit likelihood with human servers as compared to self-ordering machines. This effect emerges because as age increases, people find it more comfortable and convenient to order from human servers. Nevertheless, when a self-ordering machine is the only option, older and younger people find it equally comfortable and convenient.

Research limitations/implications

This research indicates that as age increases, consumers tend to choose human servers. However, age does not impact willingness to use technology when human service is not available. A limitation of our research is that we look at food ordering contexts only. Another limitation is that most participants were between 18 and 60 years of age.

Practical implications

With a better understanding of the effect of age on preference for service types and the reason behind it, this research helps implement and manage service technologies that may elicit favorable judgments and decisions from consumers.

Originality/value

It demonstrates how, when and why age affects the intention to visit service providers that adopt self-service technologies. This research suggests that as age increases, consumers like human service better, but they do not resist self-service technology.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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