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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2021

Mark S. Rosenbaum, Gabby Walters, Karen L. Edwards and Claudia Fernanda Gonzalez-Arcos

This commentary puts forth a conceptual framework, referred to as the consumer, organization, government framework of unintended digital technology service failures, that…

Abstract

Purpose

This commentary puts forth a conceptual framework, referred to as the consumer, organization, government framework of unintended digital technology service failures, that specifies consumer, organizational and governmental shortcomings that result in digital technologies failing in terms of negatively affecting consumer, communal, national and/or global welfare.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conceptualize an original framework by engaging in a literature review regarding marketplace failures associated with digital service technologies.

Findings

The framework shows that three drivers explain why commercial digital technologies often fail. The first driver highlights misuse or criminal intent from individuals. The second involves organizations failing to prevent or to address technology failures. The third pertains to failures that stem from governmental institutions.

Research limitations/implications

The authors encourage researchers to build on their framework by putting forth research questions. To prevent or lessen opportunities for digital technologies to result in service failures, the authors also offer practitioners a “digital technology service failure audit.” This audit shows how digital technology creators and managers can anticipate and address consumer, organizational and governmental factors that often cause digital service technologies failures.

Social implications

Despite the absence of industry-specific regulations and the existence of some regulatory immunities, digital technology providers have an ethical duty, and may be obligated under applicable tort law principles, to take steps to prevent unintended harm to consumers before launching their service technologies.

Originality/value

This work reveals that digital technologies represent new and different threats to vulnerable consumers, who often rely on, but do not fully understand, these technologies in their everyday living. The framework helps consumers, organizations and government agencies to identify and remedy current and potential instances of harmful digital technologies.

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

David Gration, Maria Raciti and Gabby Walters

– The purpose of this paper is to explore festivalgoer/camper perceptions of and responses to the non-urban festival service environment (blended festivalscape).

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore festivalgoer/camper perceptions of and responses to the non-urban festival service environment (blended festivalscape).

Design/methodology/approach

For this exploratory study a quantitative approach was adopted. A self-administered online survey was administered to recipient members of an Australian non-urban festival e-newsletter database resulting in 398 usable responses from festival campers.

Findings

Environmental beliefs held by festival campers’ influenced their perceptions of naturescape, socialscape and overall satisfaction. Festival campers’ who attended more than once were found to have stronger pro-environmental beliefs than those who attended once. Festival camper perception of naturescape has a positive moderating influence leading to greater overall satisfaction and the likelihood of repeat attendance and positive word-of-mouth.

Research limitations/implications

It is very important to know how festivalgoers perceive and relate to their festival service environment. Critical to the appeal and success of the non-urban festival is the alignment of festivalgoer environmental beliefs to the natural setting in which they are held. Limitations include use of a single case study context.

Originality/value

This paper responds to lack of research on non-urban festivals when compared to urban festivals and the surprisingly little interest shown in the central role of natural settings and the camping experience. A closer understanding of the environmental beliefs of campers at non-urban festivals has the potential to provide beneficial outcomes for people, profit and planet.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Randy L. Abbott

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Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2020

Abstract

Details

Black Metal, Trauma, Subjectivity and Sound: Screaming the Abyss
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-925-6

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Janet H. Taylor and Joe Ryan

A new form of “museum” has emerged which takes advantage of theInternet′s seemingly limitless format options for electronicpresentation and ability to tailor in‐depth…

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Abstract

A new form of “museum” has emerged which takes advantage of the Internet′s seemingly limitless format options for electronic presentation and ability to tailor in‐depth presentations to niche audiences. Constraints of ownership and geographic location are lessened as Internet‐based museums point to sources across the globe. Collections which are physically impossible to construct are being mounted electronically. Offers a sampler of museums and galleries around the world which are making use of WorldWide Web or Gopher servers.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2023

Francine Richer and Louis Jacques Filion

Shortly before the Second World War, a woman who had never accepted her orphan status, Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel, nicknamed ‘Little Coco’ by her father and known as ‘Coco’ to her…

Abstract

Shortly before the Second World War, a woman who had never accepted her orphan status, Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel, nicknamed ‘Little Coco’ by her father and known as ‘Coco’ to her relatives, became the first women in history to build a world-class industrial empire. By 1935, Coco, a fashion designer and industry captain, was employing more than 4,000 workers and had sold more than 28,000 dresses, tailored jackets and women's suits. Born into a poor family and raised in an orphanage, she enjoyed an intense social life in Paris in the 1920s, rubbing shoulders with artists, creators and the rising stars of her time.

Thanks to her entrepreneurial skills, she was able to innovate in her methods and in her trendsetting approach to fashion design and promotion. Coco Chanel was committed and creative, had the soul of an entrepreneur and went on to become a world leader in a brand new sector combining fashion, accessories and perfumes that she would help shape. By the end of her life, she had redefined French elegance and revolutionized the way people dressed.

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Felicity Cheal and Tony Griffin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the Australian tourist experience at Gallipoli in order to better understand how tourists approach and engage with battlefield sites and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the Australian tourist experience at Gallipoli in order to better understand how tourists approach and engage with battlefield sites and how the experience may transform them. Specific attention is paid to the role of interpretation in shaping these experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research method was employed, involving in‐depth interviews with Australians who had visited Gallipoli in a range of circumstances.

Findings

Australians visit Gallipoli for a variety of reasons, including national sentiment and personal connections. They engage with the site in a range of highly personal ways, with guides playing a crucial role in helping them to connect with the site physically, intellectually and emotionally.

Research limitations/implications

The study relied on the participants recalling their experiences from some years past, although other research suggests that this is a minimal problem in the context of such memorable and moving experiences.

Practical implications

The paper provides valuable insights into how tourists experience battlefield sites of great national significance, and consequently how such sites should be managed sensitively and unobtrusively.

Originality/value

This research provides empirical support to conceptual studies on how tourists engage with battlefield tourism sites, and specifically explores the role of interpretation in shaping the overall experience. It further considers the ongoing effects of such experiences.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2024

Simone Pizzi, Fabio Caputo and Elbano de Nuccio

This study aims to contribute to the emerging debate about materiality with novel insights about the signaling effects related to the disclosure of environmental, social and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to the emerging debate about materiality with novel insights about the signaling effects related to the disclosure of environmental, social and governance (ESG) information using the guidelines released by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB).

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical assessment using panel data analysis was built to evaluate the relationship between sustainability reporting standards and analysts’ forecast accuracy.

Findings

The analysis revealed that the proliferation of sustainability reports prepared on mandatory or voluntary basis mitigated the signaling effects related to the disclosure of ESG information by companies. Furthermore, the additional analysis conducted considering sustainability reporting quality and ESG performance revealed the existence of mixed effects on analysts’ forecasts accuracy. Therefore, the insights highlighted the need to consider a cautionary approach in evaluating the contribution of ESG data to financial evaluations.

Practical implications

The practical implications consist of identifying criticisms related to disclosing ESG information by listed companies. In detail, the analysis underlines the need to enhance reporting standards’ interoperability to support the development of more accurate analysis by investors and financial experts.

Social implications

The analysis reveals increasing attention investors pay to socially responsible initiatives, confirming that financial markets consider sustainability reporting as a strategic driver to engage with stakeholders and investors.

Originality/value

This research represents one of the first attempts to explore differences between GRI and SASB using an empirical approach.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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