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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Nur Zulaikha Bt Mohamed Sadom, Farzana Quoquab and Jihad Mohammad

The prevailing overconsumption issue in the hotel industry is attributable mainly to the irresponsible consumption behaviour of hotel guests. In parallel with Islamic…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevailing overconsumption issue in the hotel industry is attributable mainly to the irresponsible consumption behaviour of hotel guests. In parallel with Islamic principles, which advocate abstinence from excess consumption and frugality, the “waste not, want not” notion can be considered as one of the effective solutions to this problem. However, little is known about the factors that drive frugality amongst Muslim tourists. In addressing this gap, this study aims to predict the effect of environmental advertising and green attitude on frugality in the context of the Malaysian hotel industry. The study also tests the mediating role of the green attitude between environmental advertising and frugality. Furthermore, it examines the role of price consciousness as a moderator of the green attitude-frugality link.

Design/methodology/approach

The stimulus-organism-response theory was used to develop the conceptual framework of this study. A cross-sectional method was used to collect 222 usable questionnaires from Muslim tourists in Malaysia. The hypothesised relationships were tested using the structural equation modelling, partial least squares approach.

Findings

The study found support for the direct effect of environmental advertising and green attitude on frugality. It also confirmed the mediating effect of the green attitude in the environmental advertising-frugality link. However, price consciousness did not moderate the relationship.

Practical implications

The findings of the study provide valuable insight for hoteliers in developing a green strategy that will foster frugality amongst Muslim hotel guests. It will also help them develop better strategies for the frugal segment, especially for the Muslim community.

Originality/value

The study is amongst the pioneers in investigating frugality in the tourism industry. It is also the first to introduce price consciousness as a moderator of the relationship between the green attitude and frugality. Furthermore, its examination of frugality amongst Muslim hotel guests is a new contribution to the literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Nur Zulaikha Mohamed Sadom, Farzana Quoquab, Jihad Mohammad and Nazimah Hussin

The environmental impact of excessive use of natural resources such as energy and water in the tourism industry has increased significantly. Thus, it is crucial to…

Abstract

Purpose

The environmental impact of excessive use of natural resources such as energy and water in the tourism industry has increased significantly. Thus, it is crucial to investigate the notion of frugality in this industry. Particularly, this study aims to examine the effect of green marketing strategies (eco-labelling and environmental advertising) and hotel guests’ green attitude towards frugality in the context of the Malaysian hotel industry. Furthermore, the mediating effect of green attitude is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Stimulus-organism-response theory was used to develop the research framework. The data were collected via a self-administered survey questionnaire, which yielded 150 complete and usable responses. A partial least square-structural equation modelling approach was used to validate the proposed model.

Findings

The results of this study revealed that environmental advertising and eco-labelling, directly and indirectly, affect frugality. Moreover, the link between green attitude and frugality also was supported. Furthermore, data supported the mediating effect of green attitude in the relationship between green marketing strategies and frugality.

Practical implications

The findings from this study can benefit hoteliers who are targeting frugal and environmentally conscious consumers. Moreover, the hoteliers will be able to understand the drivers of frugality in the tourism industry. It can assist them to formulate better marketing strategies in attracting and retaining frugal consumers.

Social implications

The findings from this study offer a number of important social implications for society, the local government and the city and tourism council. Particularly, understanding the strategies towards frugality can pave the way towards the formation of a “less consumption” community. Moreover, it will serve as the guideline for designing the green and sustainability campaign for the nation.

Originality/value

This study is among the pioneers to investigate the issue pertaining to frugality in the tourism industry context. This study examines new linkages such as the indirect effect of green marketing strategies towards frugality. Moreover, the mediating effect of green attitude in the relationship between green marketing strategies (eco-labelling and environmental advertising) and frugality is comparatively a new link.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Volkan Yeniaras and Tugra Nazli Akarsu

Exchange is often identified as the primary role of marketing. Consumer behaviour literature, therefore, focuses on uncovering the characteristics of decision-making…

Abstract

Purpose

Exchange is often identified as the primary role of marketing. Consumer behaviour literature, therefore, focuses on uncovering the characteristics of decision-making styles of individuals that embrace consuming. However, recent global economic crises have led consumers to become increasingly frugal. Approaching frugality from the religious perspective, this paper aims to identify the deep-level diversities of frugal consumers in their quality consciousness tendencies, rather than simply equating both frugality and religiosity to non-consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a counterintuitive model has been offered that includes the positive moderating effect of religiosity on the relationship between frugality and quality consciousness. Using structural equation modelling, this paper tests the proposed model using a unique sample of 413 adults.

Findings

This paper extends the knowledge in the consumer behaviour literature by providing empirical evidence that religiosity positively moderates the relationship of frugality to quality consciousness. Further scrutiny showed that at high levels of religiosity, frugality positively affects quality consciousness.

Originality/value

This paper offers new avenues of research by highlighting the importance of not equating frugality and religiosity to low levels of consumption and abstinence from consuming. The dynamic nature of the growing Islamic economy requires both the scholars and practitioners to comprehend the consumers’ consumption preferences in markets where religious beliefs and frugality are well embedded into the culture. The paper sheds light on the literature pertinent to the examination of the relationship between frugality and religiosity by suggesting that the highly religious Muslim consumers’ frugality translates into quality consciousness.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Zhihong Gao

This paper aims to examine how the official discourse of frugality evolved in China between 1979 and 2015.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how the official discourse of frugality evolved in China between 1979 and 2015.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses historical and textual analysis. It divides the Chinese official discourse on frugality between 1979 and 2015 into four periods: 1979-1992, 1993-2002, 2003-2012 and 2013-2015.

Findings

A Chinese official discourse on frugality persisted between 1979 and 2015, even though during the same period, China transformed from a socialist economy of central planning and insufficient supply to a market economy of excessive supply and weak consumer demand. The intensity of this official discourse frequently vacillated, adjusting to both economic and political conditions of the time as part of the larger political-economic contestation between competing ideas and policies.

Originality/value

There have been calls for more studies on how frugality discourses have evolved in international markets, especially in terms of how they are shaped by local historical antecedents and long-standing tensions. Through the Chinese case, this article illuminates why some traditional values persist and obtain a paradoxical co-existence with consumerist ethos in our modern society.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2021

Shelley Haines and Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee

This study segmented consumers by combining emotional and shopping characteristics to develop typologies that classify their consumption patterns and disposal behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

This study segmented consumers by combining emotional and shopping characteristics to develop typologies that classify their consumption patterns and disposal behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

To identify segments of fashion consumers, an online questionnaire was administered measuring emotional and shopping characteristics, including perspective taking, empathic concern, personal distress, hedonism, and frugality. An online questionnaire involving 168 US-based participants were used to accomplish the purpose of the study. A cluster analysis was conducted to identify segments of participants based on these variables. Consumption patterns and disposal behavior, including motivation to buy environmentally friendly items, consciousness for sustainable consumption, buying impulsiveness, likelihood to follow fashion trends, and tendencies to dispose of or repair damaged or unwanted items were also measured via the questionnaire as dependent variables to be predicted by identified segments.

Findings

Three clusters of consumers were identified as: Distressed and Self-Oriented, Warm and Thrifty, and Cold and Frivolous. Distressed and Self-Oriented individuals reported the highest levels of personal distress and hedonism. Warm and Thrifty individuals reported the highest levels of empathic concern, perspective taking and frugality, and the lowest levels of personal distress and hedonism. Cold and Frivolous individuals reported the lowest levels of perspective taking, empathic concern, and frugality.

Originality/value

The classification of consumers into segments brings a new dimension to the field of sustainable fashion. Clusters were created according to the variables of emotional characteristics (i.e. perspective taking, empathic concern, and personal distress) and shopping characteristics (i.e. hedonism and frugality). The analysis unveiled three distinct clusters that can be utilized to develop tailored strategies to successfully promote sustainable fashion consumption.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Angeline Gautami Fernando, Bharadhwaj Sivakumaran and L. Suganthi

Second-hand/used goods channels compete with existing traditional channels to satisfy consumers’ needs that are unmet by traditional retail networks. However, most studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Second-hand/used goods channels compete with existing traditional channels to satisfy consumers’ needs that are unmet by traditional retail networks. However, most studies on online shopping have largely ignored online second-hand/used good purchases. This study aims to use Thaler’s mental accounting model, principal–agent perspective and contamination theory to highlight the differences in the value sought by online new goods and second-hand shoppers.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework linking perceived uncertainty, perceived acquisition value and e-loyalty was developed and tested using structural equation modelling. The moderating effects of product type (new vs second-hand) and frugality were also included.

Findings

The paper found strong support for the model. Results showed that online second-hand shoppers were more uncertain and perceived lesser levels of acquisition value when compared to new goods shoppers. They were also less frugal. Online shoppers are also more likely to buy products with sensory attributes (experience goods) in new goods websites and products with non-sensory attributes (search goods) from second-hand websites. The authors recommend various ways in which managers can increase perceived value for the online shopper.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies can extend this investigation by including transaction value or other hedonic values to verify their impact on acquisition value and e-loyalty. While the authors found support for the notion that consumers who buy used goods online are less frugal, there is some research that could point to the opposite. Hence, research can investigate this topic in depth in more countries to throw more light on this.

Practical implications

To sustain themselves in a competitive online market, retailers need to understand the value sought by consumers. This study provides empirical evidence of the importance of acquisition value for new goods and second-hand shoppers.

Originality/value

No recent research has compared the value sought by online second-hand and new goods shoppers. This study contributes to the understanding of the acquisition value perceived by consumers in online new goods and second-hand shopping channels.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2019

Ayşen Coşkun and Raife Meltem Yetkin Özbük

The purpose of this study is to segment young millennials in an emerging economy based on their environmental attitudes and purchase intentions. The study also attempts to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to segment young millennials in an emerging economy based on their environmental attitudes and purchase intentions. The study also attempts to describe the segments and highlight their differences in terms of happiness, frugality, environmental locus of control, and environmental knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample consisted of 227 Turkish undergraduate students. A two-step cluster analysis was performed on environmental attitudes and purchase intentions scores. The differences among the clusters were then examined according to happiness, frugality, environmental locus of control, and environmental knowledge variables.

Findings

A two-step cluster analysis identified three clusters, namely, “non-greens”, “reluctant greens” and “true greens”, all of whom differed in terms of environmental attitudes and purchase intentions. Non-greens (n = 16) and true greens (n = 121) yielded the lowest and the highest scores for environmental attitudes and purchase intentions, respectively. Three clusters also differed significantly in terms of frugality. Environmental knowledge levels of non-greens differed from those of reluctant greens and true greens. There is no significant difference regarding happiness and environmental locus of control among clusters.

Practical implications

Local and international companies interested in marketing green products to young millennials in emerging economies may enhance their understanding of non-green and green young millennials in the target markets and differentiate their marketing strategies for each segment.

Originality/value

Given the need for a better understanding of young millennials’ environmental behavior in an emerging economy, the current study contributes to the literature by segmenting young Turkish millennials based on their environmental attitudes and purchase intentions, further describing the consumer segments with different variables such as happiness, frugality, environmental locus of control and environmental knowledge.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Eunyoung (Christine) Sung and Patricia Huddleston

This paper explores the antecedents and consequences of consumers’ need for self-image congruence on their retail patronage of department (high-end) and discount (low-end…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the antecedents and consequences of consumers’ need for self-image congruence on their retail patronage of department (high-end) and discount (low-end) stores to purchase name-brand products in two product categories, apparel and home décor. It also compared online to offline shopping and considered two mediator variables, frugality and materialism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzed the hypothesized relationships using structural equation modeling (SEM) and MANOVA. Study 1 suggested the model using secondary data, and Study 2 measured and confirmed the relationships using scenario-based online survey data. An MANOVA test was used to compare the shopping behavior of consumers with high and low need for self-image congruence.

Findings

A strong causal link was found between concern with appearance and need for self-image congruence, and a positive relationship between need for self-image congruence and high- and low-end retail store patronage offline and online. While the group with high (vs low) need for self-image congruence was more likely to patronize department stores, unexpectedly, both the high and low self-image congruence groups were equally likely to shop at discount stores.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that marketing messages focusing on concern for appearance may succeed by tapping into consumers’ need for self-image congruence with brand product/retail store images. Results also showed that consumers with high self-image congruence often patronize discount retail stores, suggesting marketing opportunities for low-end retailers.

Originality/value

Because consumers with high need for self-image congruence patronize both department and discount stores, it is suggested that self-image congruity may be multi-dimensional. The current study is also the first to examine structural relationships to test patronage behavior between department and discount stores offline and online.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2017

Laszlo Zsolnai

The encyclical letter of Pope Francis, “Praised Be: On the Care of Our Common Home” (Laudato si’), presented an excellent opportunity to spark a conversation between…

Abstract

The encyclical letter of Pope Francis, “Praised Be: On the Care of Our Common Home” (Laudato si’), presented an excellent opportunity to spark a conversation between economics and faith-based discourses on sustainability. The encyclical underlined the human origins of the ecological crisis and proposed fundamental changes in organizing our economic life. Among the important suggestions put forward by the Pope are increased frugality in consumption and acknowledging the intrinsic value of nature.

Frugality implies rebalancing the spiritual and material values in economic life. This may lead to the rehabilitation of the substantive meaning of the “economic” and the revival of the corresponding logic of sufficiency. Despite their different ontological and anthropological conceptions, the ecological position of the Pope’s encyclical has close links with Deep Ecology and Buddhist Economics. Both Deep Ecology and Buddhist Economics point out that emphasizing individuality and promoting the greatest fulfillment of the desires of the individual together lead to destruction. Happiness is linked to wholeness, not to personal wealth.

Mainstream economics fails to acknowledge the intrinsic value of nature. It is happy to put value on environmental goods and services merely on the basis of a market value determined by competing economic actors. But price, for sure, is an inappropriate model for assessing the value of natural entities. There is no algorithmic solution to nature’s allocation problems. Decisions and policies related to nature require making qualitative and multiperspective considerations and the proper use of our wisdom, knowledge, and experience.

Details

Integral Ecology and Sustainable Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-463-7

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Daniel Peter Hampson, Shuang (Sara) Ma and Yonggui Wang

Global brands are attracted to emerging markets because of increasing wealth among their middle classes. However, amid increasing levels of consumer financial stress in…

Abstract

Purpose

Global brands are attracted to emerging markets because of increasing wealth among their middle classes. However, amid increasing levels of consumer financial stress in many emerging markets, evidence points towards increased preferences for domestic products. The purpose of this paper is to examine the psychological constructs that mediate and moderate the relationship between reduced perceived financial well-being (PFWB) and domestic product purchases.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a model drawing from three theoretical perspectives: consumer stress and coping, consumer information processing and social identity theory. Hypotheses are tested via structural equation modelling and moderated mediation analyses using data from a survey of Brazilian consumers (n=1,043).

Findings

Results show that the positive relationship between reduced PFWB and domestic product purchases is partially mediated by perceived value of global brands and frugality descriptive norm. Further analyses demonstrate that consumer confidence moderates the mediating effects of perceived value of global brands and pro-social consumer ethnocentrism on the relationship between reduced PFWB and domestic product purchases.

Research limitations/implications

The antecedents of domestic product purchases identified in this study indicate opportunities for marketers of domestic and foreign products to respond to reduced PFWB, especially in relation to pricing, branding and communications. Future research should examine implications of PFWB on different populations, including other emerging markets, developed markets and lower-income consumers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to international marketing literature by examining the hitherto unexplored influence of reduced PFWB on domestic product purchases.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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