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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Iris Mohr, Leonora Fuxman and Ali B. Mahmoud

This article critically synthesizes the literature on sustainable fashion, the movement behind it and plausible fashion adoption theories. Then, to build on those studies…

Abstract

Purpose

This article critically synthesizes the literature on sustainable fashion, the movement behind it and plausible fashion adoption theories. Then, to build on those studies, developing a new theory about adopting sustainable fashion – mainly among millennials and Generation Z who are behind forwarding and adopting this fashion trend – is sought after.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a theory-synthesized conceptual article that presents a literature-informed new theoretical structure pronouncing sustainable fashion adoption and its rise as a new luxury trend. That included explicating and unraveling the conceptual foundations and construction elements that different viewpoints use to articulate the trend under investigation and the searches for a common basis to construct a new and improved conceptual framework.

Findings

This study introduces the triple-trickle theory that incorporates the role of media and technology to organize and understand the diffusion of sustainable fashion and identify paths for future trickle-effects on fashion research.

Research limitations/implications

Even though this has the benefit of offering a vast array of views and evidence that offers an adequate problem inspection, further studies providing empirical evidence are needed to establish the external validity of the theory derived from this research.

Practical implications

This theory can be applied to develop targeted practices to understand the diffusion and adoption of sustainable fashion and further practitioners’ understanding of product positioning, target marketing, marketing strategy and luxury opportunities in general.

Originality/value

Though interest in sustainable fashion has increased among consumers, no theory or model exists to explain its adoption. Therefore, the triple-trickle theory is proposed and aimed to be a more relevant framework to offer a theoretical premise for future empirical investigations of sustainable fashion adoption.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

Amélia Brandão and Ana Gonçalves da Costa

Extending the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper aims to measure the relative importance of different barriers to sustainable fashion consumption (SFC).

Abstract

Purpose

Extending the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper aims to measure the relative importance of different barriers to sustainable fashion consumption (SFC).

Design/methodology/approach

Existing studies have mainly adopted a qualitative methodology for identifying barriers to uptake of SFC, this study uses six of the main identified barriers: environmental apparel knowledge, perceived value, price sensitivity, product attributes and variety, availability and scepticism into the TPB framework to test and reveal which barriers have the greater impact on the TPB cognitions and consequently on building intention towards SFC. To test this model a survey study among 669 consumers from Europe, Asian and North America was conducted, structural equation modelling is used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Findings confirm the role of TPB cognitions on predicting intention and show that the proposed barriers provide a satisfactory explanation of the TPB model. Furthermore, results show that product attributes and variety and environmental apparel knowledge have the greatest impact on the TPB cognitions and on building intention towards SFC. Differences were found between the impacts of the price for the three continents.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the emerging sustainable fashion literature by examining the impact of different barriers to SFC in an extended TPB framework. To the best of our knowledge price sensitivity, availability and scepticism have never been studied in the context of sustainable fashion. It also provides a multifactor group analysis which uncovers differences among consumers from different continents.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Claudia E. Henninger, Panayiota J. Alevizou and Caroline J. Oates

The purpose of this paper is to examine what the term sustainable fashion means from the perspective of micro-organisations, experts, and consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine what the term sustainable fashion means from the perspective of micro-organisations, experts, and consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is qualitative in nature, utilising a multi-methods case study approach (semi-structured interviews, semiotics, questionnaires). Grounded analysis was applied to analyse the data.

Findings

Findings indicate that interpretation of sustainable fashion is context and person dependent. A matrix of key criteria provides the opportunity to find common elements.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the nature of this research the sample size is limited and may not be generalised. Data were collected in the UK and are limited to a geographical region.

Practical implications

An important implication is that defining sustainable fashion is vital in order to avoid challenges, such as greenwashing, which were faced in other industries that have a longer history in sustainable practices. Micro-organisations should take advantage of identifying key sustainable fashion criteria, which will enable them to promote their fashion collections more effectively.

Social implications

The criteria identified provide assurance for consumers that sustainable fashion is produced with social aspects in mind (fair wages, good working conditions).

Originality/value

The paper proposes a matrix that allows micro-organisations to clearly identify their collections as sustainable.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Elaine L Ritch

– The purpose of this paper is to explore consumer perceptions and understanding of sustainable concepts within the context of fashion consumption.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore consumer perceptions and understanding of sustainable concepts within the context of fashion consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Phenomenological interviews provided a platform to explore fashion sustainability and garment labels from current UK high street fashion retailers were used to stimulate discussion.

Findings

The findings identify confusion of how sustainability applies to fashion, particularly for environmental issues and there was scepticism regarding higher pricing for organic cotton. However, motivation to avoid fashion produced under exploitation resulted in avoiding retailers alleged of such practice, paying more for garments and purchasing from established UK retailers.

Research limitations/implications

The idiographic nature of a phenomenological approach may be considered as a limitation, yet this in-depth exploration of participants with similar socio-demographics enables a rich understanding of the discourse experienced within their lifeworlds.

Practical implications

The findings illustrate that consumers are transferring sustainable principles from one context to another, and that by addressing sustainability, fashion retailers could obtain a competitive advantage.

Social implications

The findings demonstrate consumers’ increased involvement with sustainability and the role expected from fashion retailers.

Originality/value

The research uniquely positions consumers’ reliance on heuristics to guide sustainable preferences, due to the lack of information and this implies that sustainable concepts are increasingly incorporated into everyday behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Gloria Jiménez-Marín, Araceli Galiano-Coronil and Luis Bayardo Tobar-Pesántez

The purpose of this study is to understand the perception and purchase intentions of Spanish consumers towards sustainable fashion and to see if this can guide the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the perception and purchase intentions of Spanish consumers towards sustainable fashion and to see if this can guide the marketing strategy for sustainable fashion.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodology has been designed to test the categories: knowledge, environmental concern, product-related features and social influence.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that some implications and advice on sustainability marketing strategy could help companies to develop sustainable fashion for Spanish consumers.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the focus on sustainability to achieve happiness and satisfaction of people as a form of governance from a social point of view.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2021

Shelley Haines and Seung Hwan (Mark) Lee

This study segmented consumers by combining emotional and shopping characteristics to develop typologies that classify their consumption patterns and disposal behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

This study segmented consumers by combining emotional and shopping characteristics to develop typologies that classify their consumption patterns and disposal behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

To identify segments of fashion consumers, an online questionnaire was administered measuring emotional and shopping characteristics, including perspective taking, empathic concern, personal distress, hedonism, and frugality. An online questionnaire involving 168 US-based participants were used to accomplish the purpose of the study. A cluster analysis was conducted to identify segments of participants based on these variables. Consumption patterns and disposal behavior, including motivation to buy environmentally friendly items, consciousness for sustainable consumption, buying impulsiveness, likelihood to follow fashion trends, and tendencies to dispose of or repair damaged or unwanted items were also measured via the questionnaire as dependent variables to be predicted by identified segments.

Findings

Three clusters of consumers were identified as: Distressed and Self-Oriented, Warm and Thrifty, and Cold and Frivolous. Distressed and Self-Oriented individuals reported the highest levels of personal distress and hedonism. Warm and Thrifty individuals reported the highest levels of empathic concern, perspective taking and frugality, and the lowest levels of personal distress and hedonism. Cold and Frivolous individuals reported the lowest levels of perspective taking, empathic concern, and frugality.

Originality/value

The classification of consumers into segments brings a new dimension to the field of sustainable fashion. Clusters were created according to the variables of emotional characteristics (i.e. perspective taking, empathic concern, and personal distress) and shopping characteristics (i.e. hedonism and frugality). The analysis unveiled three distinct clusters that can be utilized to develop tailored strategies to successfully promote sustainable fashion consumption.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Orpha de Lenne and Laura Vandenbosch

Using the theory of planned behavior, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between different types of media and the intention to buy sustainable

Abstract

Purpose

Using the theory of planned behavior, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between different types of media and the intention to buy sustainable apparel and test whether attitudes, social norms, and self-efficacy beliefs may explain these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey study was conducted among 681 young adults (18-26 years old).

Findings

Exposure to social media content of sustainable organizations, eco-activists, and sustainable apparel brands, and social media content of fashion bloggers and fast fashion brands predicted respondents’ attitudes, descriptive and subjective norms, and self-efficacy beliefs regarding buying sustainable apparel. In turn, attitudes, descriptive norms, and self-efficacy beliefs predicted the intention to buy sustainable apparel. Fashion magazines predicted the intention through self-efficacy. Specialized magazines did not predict the intention to buy sustainable apparel.

Research limitations/implications

Results should be generalized with caution as the current study relied on a convenience sample of young adults. The cross-sectional study design limits the ability to draw conclusions regarding causality. Actual behavior was not addressed and needs to be included in further research.

Practical implications

The present study hints at the importance of social media to affect young consumers’ intentions to buy sustainable apparel. Sustainable apparel brands should consider attracting more young social media users to their social media pages.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine the potential of different media to promote sustainable apparel buying intention.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Amira Mukendi, Iain Davies, Sarah Glozer and Pierre McDonagh

The sustainable fashion (SF) literature is fragmented across the management discipline, leaving the path to a SF future unclear. As of yet, there has not been an attempt…

Abstract

Purpose

The sustainable fashion (SF) literature is fragmented across the management discipline, leaving the path to a SF future unclear. As of yet, there has not been an attempt to bring these insights together or to more generally explore the question of “what is known about SF in the management literature and where could the SF field go from there?”. The purpose of this paper is to bring together the field to identify opportunities for societal impact and further research.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted from the first appearances of SF in the management literature in 2000 up to papers published in June 2019, which resulted in 465 included papers.

Findings

The results illustrate that SF research is largely defined by two approaches, namely, pragmatic change and radical change. The findings reveal seven research streams that span across the discipline to explore how organisational and consumer habits can be shaped for the future.

Research limitations/implications

What is known about SF is constantly evolving, therefore, the paper aims to provide a representative sample of the state of SF in management literature to date.

Practical implications

This review provides decision makers with insights that have been synthesised from across the management field.

Originality/value

This review identifies knowledge gaps and informs managerial decision making in the field, particularly through serving as a foundation for further research.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2021

Danielle Sponder Testa, Sonia Bakhshian and Rachel Eike

The purpose of this study was to explore drivers of consumer engagement with sustainable fashion brands on Instagram to specifically answer the research question: what…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore drivers of consumer engagement with sustainable fashion brands on Instagram to specifically answer the research question: what drives popularity of sustainable fashion among digital consumers?

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty-five global fashion retailers were identified and categorized as either (a) sustainable fashion brands (SFB), (b) sustainably aware mainstream brands (SAB) or (c) traditional fashion brands (TFB). Content analysis of the 25 retailer's Instagram posts over a three-week period was analyzed and categorized according to content theme. Data were analyzed for quantity of Likes and Comments (engagement) to identify engagement strategies with each of the brand groups.

Findings

It was found that different strategies may be taken regarding social media strategy for SFB, SAB or TFB. Consumers were engaged with unfamiliar content, for instance, sustainability to a consumer unfamiliar with the topic or how it applies to a specific brand. Digital consumers were looking for exciting and aesthetically pleasing posts. Specifically, all consumers were engaged with posts about Fashion and Lifestyle.

Practical implications

As the result of this study, sustainable fashion best practices and social media strategies were presented for the three brand categories of fashion retailers.

Originality/value

This study analyzed a cross-section of global fashion brands and identified “best practices” for digital consumer engagement with sustainable messages through Instagram. The findings provide original value, specifically in the area of fashion marketing via social media to communicate brand identify to digital consumers for brand growth.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Marie‐Cécile Cervellon and Anne‐Sophie Wernerfelt

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the knowledge content on green fashion and the expectations regarding the sustainable supply chain held by consumers and shared…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the knowledge content on green fashion and the expectations regarding the sustainable supply chain held by consumers and shared within online communities. In sustainable and eco‐sectors, the supply chain is of outmost concern for consumers, as most benefits derived from the eco‐purchase are linked to the green and ethical credentials of the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

A netnographic approach is used. Discussions on green fashion were collected in two green fashion forums over two periods (2007‐2008 and 2010‐2011) and were content analyzed.

Findings

Results show a switch in knowledge content between the two periods, from a focus on sustainability to a focus on fashion. Also, there is an evolution in the nature of knowledge content, being initially subjective and becoming more objective and showing expertise during the last period studied. As the communities gain maturity, members are interested in sharing precise knowledge on a variety of aspects linked to the sustainable supply chain, including fabric, materials, manufacturing processes, transportation, distribution, and recycling or re‐use of fashion items. In addition, the role of the members evolves toward educating newcomers and sustaining the development of the green fashion sector.

Originality value

This research contributes to the field by offering an original perspective on the green fashion supply chain and consumer vision of the industry, through the point of view of major actors and online communities. It advocates for a consumer orientation in the building of sustainable fashion supply chains.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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