Search results

1 – 10 of over 16000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Xiaoyong Wei and Sojin Jung

When fast fashion brands launch corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs, consumers may consider these brands to behave hypocritically as their business model is…

Abstract

Purpose

When fast fashion brands launch corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs, consumers may consider these brands to behave hypocritically as their business model is generally perceived as being inconsistent with sustainable practices. Built on construal level theory (CLT), this study aims to examine how the benefit appeals that are widely used in CSR initiatives affect perceived corporate hypocrisy and the CSR performance of fast fashion brands.

Design/methodology/approach

This study designed an online experiment with a 2 (fashion brand: fast fashion vs. unknown) × 2 (benefit appeal: self-benefit vs other-benefit) stimulus, using a virtual label named “Eco Care” for experimental manipulation. A total number of 298 Chinese consumers participated in the experiment and they answered an online survey.

Findings

It was found that the brand types (fast fashion vs unknown) and benefit appeals (self-benefit vs other benefit) did not elicit perceived corporate hypocrisy nor did them directly affect perceptions of CSR performance. However, there was a significant interaction effect of them. That is, fast fashion brand’s CSR performance was judged based on how the brand framed its sustainability claims. A fast fashion brand’s CSR label significantly increased hypocrisy perceptions when the label used a self-benefit appeal and the interactive effect of the fast fashion brand and the self-benefit appeal hindered the formation of a green brand image and brand purchase intentions.

Originality/value

This study adds a body of knowledge to the literature by examining the relationship between benefit appeals and perceived corporate hypocrisy from the perspective of CLT. The findings can help fast fashion marketers better understand the critical role of benefit appeals by acknowledging that the misuse of communication strategies may result in unfavorable consequences, thus ruining their efforts to improve their brand’s image.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Simone Guercini and Andrea Runfola

This paper aims to deal with the issue of business model change in industrial markets. It considers the fast-fashion supply chain by addressing the following research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with the issue of business model change in industrial markets. It considers the fast-fashion supply chain by addressing the following research questions: What are the paths of change of the supplier’s business model to match the business model of fast fashion customers? How can a supplier’s business model be adapted to customer’s requirements in these paths of change?

Design/methodology/approach

Empirically, the paper presents a multiple case study of 10 semi-finished textile suppliers, carried out through a long-term research programme in the Italian textile industrial district of Prato.

Findings

The multiple-case study shows some key drivers of change in the suppliers’ business models. Three main paths emerged from the interactions with fast fashion clients. Paradoxes in the supplier’s business model changes are identified and discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The paper proposes implications for suppliers interacting with fast fashion clients and discusses how the adaptation of business models may be interpreted. This study points out how matching the business model of the customers does not call for alignment of similar features.

Originality/value

The paper deals with an understudied topic within the literature: business models change in business to business markets, taking into consideration the perspective of the supplier. It considers buyers-seller relationships in industrial supply chains as being part of a chain of business models and the need for the supplier’s business model to adapt and match one of the clients. The paper proposes two potential interpretations of such adaptation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Lucas Ramos Camargo, Susana Carla Farias Pereira and Marcia Regina Santiago Scarpin

The aim of this study is to identify and analyse the main strategic differences between fast and ultra-fast fashion supply chain management.

Downloads
7331

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to identify and analyse the main strategic differences between fast and ultra-fast fashion supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative approach, using document analysis and in-depth interviews with industry specialists.

Findings

Ultra-fast fashion differs from fast in the following supply chain strategies: avoids any excess inventory, focuses on local manufacturing, on-demand production, and shorter lead times from a few days to a week with a combination of agile, lean, responsive supply chain strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research are due to the cut-off period and the use of a restricted sample. As implications, technological capabilities are underexplored in the fashion industry. Although important to the traditional and fast fashion industry, technology is viewed as a tool and not as a capability that can generate competitive advantage. This paper addresses technology as capabilities to make ultra-fast fashion retailers more competitive.

Practical implications

Ultra-fast fashion could potentially impact current fast fashion retailers to partially move their business model and operations towards an ultra-fast approach. Fast fashion retailers desiring to speed up their production processes launch more weekly collections to cater to consumers who are more fashion-conscious.

Originality/value

There is a rapid emergence of new start-ups that are calling themselves ultra-fast. Newcomers wanting to adopt this new segment’s business model, develop technological capabilities to meet the challenges of this supercompetitive market.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

S.G. Hayes and Nicola Jones

The purpose of this paper is to establish an objective measure for the success of fast fashion to deliver measurable financial improvement.

Downloads
25286

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish an objective measure for the success of fast fashion to deliver measurable financial improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

A statistical analysis of published financial data has been used to determine if any statistically significant difference exists between the financial performance of retailers split into two groups; fast fashion and non‐fast fashion

Findings

The research shows that no statistically significant difference exists between the financial measures of the two groups. However, some objectivity is given to the claim that reduced inventory contributes to the financial health of a fast fashion retailer.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to published financial data; for some retailers this was not available at all, for others, it was not available for each, and similar, years.

Originality/value

To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper to look objectively at the financial benefits associated with retailing to a fast fashion model.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Andrea Runfola and Simone Guercini

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the fast fashion formula and the process of firm internationalization. Possible answers are sought to…

Downloads
9891

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the fast fashion formula and the process of firm internationalization. Possible answers are sought to the following research question: does the fast fashion formula drive the internationalization process (driving the change), or does the internationalization process change the model (changing the model).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents and discusses the data collected during a ten‐year longitudinal case analysis of an Italian fast fashion company. Three main steps in the firm's international expansion are identified, and the firm's strategies for managing its fast model in each are then discussed.

Findings

The findings highlight how the process of internationalization has exerted pressure on the firm's business model. In particular, the case reveals that the company's international development has had a strong impact on three main components of its fast fashion model.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to previous work on fast fashion by focusing on the sustainability of such models during international expansion, a key theme which has to date received little attention in ongoing academic debate on the fast fashion phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Tara Stringer, Gary Mortimer and Alice Ruth Payne

The rise of fast fashion has changed the face of global fashion. Despite sector growth, critics have questioned the level of obsolescence, encouragement of…

Downloads
11360

Abstract

Purpose

The rise of fast fashion has changed the face of global fashion. Despite sector growth, critics have questioned the level of obsolescence, encouragement of over-consumption and fast fashion's unsustainable business practices. Specifically, mounting concerns surround the impact on environmental, worker and animal welfare. Accordingly, the aim of this current work is to understand the influence of consumer's values on ethical consumption in a fast-fashion context.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was designed to collect responses relating to personal values and ethical concerns towards animal and worker welfare issues, as well as environmental concerns. A total of 350 US-based fast-fashion consumers completed the survey via Amazon MTurk. Factor analyses and structural equation modelling were used to analyse and test a theoretically hypothesised model.

Findings

This study found that self-transcendence values and openness to change values have a positive impact on consumers' levels of ethical concern towards animal welfare, the environment and worker welfare concerns within the fashion industry. Furthermore, a consumer's level of concern towards animal welfare and the environment positively influences a consumer's likeliness to purchase ethically marketed fast fashion.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the role of consumer values and their influence on ethical concerns within the fashion industry and the impact of these concerns on intentions to purchase ethically marketed fast fashion. Responding to calls for further research into ethical consumption of apparel, this study includes all elements of ethical consumption identified, including animal welfare. This study identifies ethical areas of concern salient amongst fast-fashion consumers and provides a deeper understanding of the values impacting the level of ethical concerns surrounding animal welfare, the environment and worker welfare.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Maegan Zarley Watson and Ruoh‐Nan Yan

The purpose of the study is to explore the differences between fast fashion and slow fashion consumers in regards to their consumer decision process stages (i.e…

Downloads
24935

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to explore the differences between fast fashion and slow fashion consumers in regards to their consumer decision process stages (i.e. purchase/consumption, post‐consumption evaluation, and divestment).

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected via focus groups and personal interviews. Participants were recruited through flyers that were posted at various locations, including a college campus, select retail stores, and www.craigslist.com The sample consisted of 38 participants, 22 fast fashion and 16 slow fashion. All participants were female, 18 years of age or older, with a mean age of 21.2 years.

Findings

Three groups of themes emerged. The purchase/consumption themes were buyers’ remorse avoidance, utilitarianism, hedonism, and style/self‐image congruence. The post‐consumption evaluation themes included instant satisfaction vs continued satisfaction and consumer expectation confirmation. Finally, the divestment themes consisted of divestment frequencies, divestment reasons, and divestment approaches.

Research limitations/implications

This study explored the purchase and post‐purchase stages of the Consumer Decision Process (CDP) model. This particular focus on the CDP model, in the context of fast (vs slow) fashion, has not been researched in the past. Additionally, this research adds to the body of knowledge by utilizing the CDP model to understand the differences between fast fashion and slow fashion consumers.

Practical implications

Fast fashion and slow fashion retailers may use this research to better understand their target markets by understanding why they choose to purchase/consume, what influences their post‐consumption evaluation, and how and why they choose to divest their clothing.

Originality/value

Past research has demonstrated the importance of understanding the supply chain and business model aspect of fast fashion. However, no empirical studies have been found that examine the decision‐making process of consumers of fast (vs slow) fashion.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Jin Su

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the nature of the inter-relationships among brand equity dimensions in the fast fashion context.

Downloads
4179

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the nature of the inter-relationships among brand equity dimensions in the fast fashion context.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the empirical data collected from 419 fast fashion consumers in the USA, the study investigated the inter-relationships among the various brand equity dimensions by structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings reveal that brand awareness has a significant and positive direct impact on brand personality and perceived value; brand personality has a significant and positive direct effect on perceived quality and perceived value; and brand awareness, perceived quality and perceived value have a significant and positive direct effect on brand loyalty, respectively.

Originality/value

Applying the brand equity model in the fast fashion industry and surveying actual consumers, the research provides in-depth empirical evidence of the interactions among the brand equity dimensions. Since fast fashion has become a key feature of the global fashion industry over the last decade, understanding the elements of brand equity and the inter-relationships among them provides important insights to marketing practitioners to develop strategies which encourage the growth of brand equity.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Hyunsook Kim, Ho Jung Choo and Namhee Yoon

This study aims to investigate the conceptual structure of fast fashion avoidance among young consumers in Korea. The effects of negative beliefs on the behavioural…

Downloads
18950

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the conceptual structure of fast fashion avoidance among young consumers in Korea. The effects of negative beliefs on the behavioural intention regarding fast fashion avoidance are empirically examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model of fast fashion avoidance is proposed and tested based on the literature and blog analyses. Web‐based online survey data are analyzed by second‐order factor analysis and hierarchical regression.

Findings

The second‐order structure of eight negative beliefs is statistically supported. Among these negative beliefs, poor performance and deindividuation have positive effects on fast fashion avoidance. While inauthenticity has a negative effect, big store discomfort and foreignness have an interaction effect with regards to the lack of alternatives.

Research limitations/implications

The results are based on convenient sampling of young female adults. However, it is tested in Korea, of which global fast fashion retailing is in its growing stage.

Originality/value

This study represents a new attempt to apply the concept of brand avoidance to an explanation of fast fashion avoidance, and test it using empirically‐collected survey data.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Veronica Gabrielli, Ilaria Baghi and Vanni Codeluppi

The aim the present study is to investigate the consumption practices of fast fashion products. During the introductory stage of this phenomenon, most academic literature…

Downloads
21329

Abstract

Purpose

The aim the present study is to investigate the consumption practices of fast fashion products. During the introductory stage of this phenomenon, most academic literature has focused its attention on structural and industrial aspects of the fast fashion phenomenon. Now that the phenomenon has been present as a part of individuals’ daily lives for some years, the time is ripe for taking a closer look at consumers’ standpoint.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative technique of focus groups was chosen to carry out the research study within Italian consumers. The decision to exploit this methodology was largely guided by the exploratory purposes of this study and by the willingness to analyze the phenomenon of fast fashion and the consumption practices by adopting a social perspective.

Findings

Results of the exploratory study show an overview of the phenomenon of fast fashion from the standpoint of the consumers and especially of the way they “live” fast fashion and integrate these products in their consumption practices.

Originality/value

The study reveals a new perspective of analysis (consumers’ standpoint) to the phenomenon of fast fashion not previously investigated and suggests useful ideas to guide the strategic levers and communications through which fast fashion companies can identify their own evolutionary path.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 16000