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Expert briefing
Publication date: 23 December 2020

While access to schools has expanded in low- and middle-income countries in recent decades, learning outcomes have not seen a corresponding improvement. The onset of…

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DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB258402

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Topical
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Expert briefing
Publication date: 17 January 2022

While the shift to online education has worsened the problems of unequal access and uneven quality, the pandemic has forced schools to adjust and students to accept long…

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DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB266710

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Mervi Rajahonka

This chapter is based on the findings of the empirical material gathered in Finland and Sweden through interviews with education and audiovisual (AV) media actors and…

Abstract

This chapter is based on the findings of the empirical material gathered in Finland and Sweden through interviews with education and audiovisual (AV) media actors and policymakers in 2017–2018. The aim of the chapter is to discuss the innovation systems of the education sector and Finland and Sweden in general, compare the sectoral innovation models of the two sectors, and conclude with discussing the resulting challenges for policymakers. Our results show that a new EdTech sector employing the competences of the education, information and communication technology, and AV media sectors has begun to emerge and actors in the both countries have eagerly taken actions to boost its development as a business and export field. We discuss the reasons and consequences of this development.

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Emergence of Cross-innovation Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-980-9

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

There are five factors acting as a barrier to the effective evaluation of educational technology (edtech), which are as follows: premature timing, inappropriate…

Abstract

Purpose

There are five factors acting as a barrier to the effective evaluation of educational technology (edtech), which are as follows: premature timing, inappropriate techniques, rapid change, complexity of context and inconsistent terminology. The purpose of this paper is to identify new evaluation approaches that will address these and reflect on the evaluation imperative for complex technology initiatives.

Approach

An initial investigation of traditional evaluative approaches used within the technology domain was broadened to investigate the evaluation practices within social and public policy domains. Realist evaluation, a branch of theory-based evaluation, was identified and reviewed in detail. The realist approach was then refined, proposing two additional necessary steps to support mapping the technical complexity of initiatives.

Findings

A refined illustrative example of a realist evaluation framework is presented, including two novel architectural edtech domain reference models to support mapping.

Practical implications

Recommendations include building individual evaluator capacity; adopting the realist framework; the use of architectural edtech domain reference models; phased evaluation to first build theories in technology “context” and then iteratively during complex implementation chains; and community contribution to a shared map of technical and organisational complexity.

Originality

This paper makes a novel contribution by arguing the imperative for a theory-based realist approach to help redefine evaluative thinking within the IT and complex system domain. It becomes an innovative proposal with the addition of two domain reference models that tailor the approach for edtech. Its widespread adoption will help build a shared evidence base that synthesizes and surfaces “what works, for whom, in which contexts and why”, benefiting educators, IT managers, funders, policymakers and future learners.

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Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Sara Dexter, Aubrey Francisco and Christina Luke Luna

The purpose of this study was to better understand K-12 district leaders' reasoning and processes for selecting and deploying EdTech instructional products, including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to better understand K-12 district leaders' reasoning and processes for selecting and deploying EdTech instructional products, including which, if any, types of data are used to support decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

This multisite case study of educational technology (EdTech) decision-making comprises five purposely selected districts at the leading edge of EdTech innovation. The unit of analysis was a recent purchase they had made of an instructional, classroom-oriented digital product (defined as a product used by teachers and/or students in the classroom for the purposes of student learning). The key leader heading up the purchase was interviewed, as were other leaders and a teacher who were involved in the decision-making process.

Findings

The processes districts used to make their purchasing decisions involved teachers, district leaders and technical specialists who considered usability, usage data and alignment with student learning and interoperability, respectively. While in some cases there were plans to collect data on student learning outcomes, districts did not uniformly emphasize that in their decision-making processes. Instead, the type of educational technology tool that was purchased influenced whether or not districts planned to seek out student-level outcome data as evidence of the product's efficacy. For the purchases associated with access to content, school leaders considered usage or log data generated by the program itself as sufficient indication that the program is “working.” Where the software's functionality encompassed skill development, leaders stated future plans to look at student-level outcomes as a means for judging if the program “worked.”

Originality/value

Few accounts of district decision-making about the adoption of educational technology innovations are present in the literature. These five cases provide insight into the role evidence plays in decisions to adopt educational technology.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 59 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Abstract

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Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Indrek Ibrus and Mervi Rajahonka

The chapter concludes the section on cross-innovation and convergence processes between audiovisual media industries and the education sector. It addresses, first, that…

Abstract

The chapter concludes the section on cross-innovation and convergence processes between audiovisual media industries and the education sector. It addresses, first, that these processes are not driven by any specific technology, but by two broad and interdependent processes – individualisation that makes people in insecure careers search for personalised learning opportunities and the experience economy that produces expectations for learning experiences to be pleasurable and fun, that is, gamified. The chapter demonstrates the emergence of EdTech as a new dialogic subsector operating between the publicly operating education sector and the private media and information and communication technology industries. It demonstrates the inherent institutional diversity in and around this subsector and discusses the nature of the dialogues constituting it. It, lastly, addresses the risks deriving from global platformisation to the education sector and demonstrates how Estonia’s government-run platforms, effectively cross-innovation systems linking teachers, learners and content providers in dynamic ways, could present feasible alternatives to the global platforms.

Abstract

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Understanding Industry 4.0: AI, the Internet of Things, and the Future of Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-312-9

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2021

David J. Harper, Darren Ellis and Ian Tucker

This chapter focusses on the ethical issues raised by different types of surveillance and the varied ways in which surveillance can be covert. Three case studies are…

Abstract

This chapter focusses on the ethical issues raised by different types of surveillance and the varied ways in which surveillance can be covert. Three case studies are presented which highlight different types of surveillance and different ethical concerns. The first case concerns the use of undercover police to infiltrate political activist groups over a 40-year period in the UK. The second case study examines a joint operation by US and Australian law enforcement agencies: the FBI’s operation Trojan Shield and the AFP’s Operation Ironside. This involved distributing encrypted phone handsets to serious criminal organisations which included a ‘backdoor’ secretly sending encrypted copies of all messages to law enforcement. The third case study analyses the use of emotional artificial intelligence systems in educational digital learning platforms for children where technology companies collect, store and use intrusive personal data in an opaque manner. The authors discuss similarities and differences in the ethical questions raised by these cases, for example, the involvement of the state versus private corporations, the kinds of information gathered and how it is used.

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Ethical Issues in Covert, Security and Surveillance Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-414-4

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Claire Englund

The purpose of this paper is to explore how teachers’ approaches to teaching and conceptions of teaching and learning with educational technology influence the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how teachers’ approaches to teaching and conceptions of teaching and learning with educational technology influence the implementation of three-dimensional virtual worlds (3DVWs) in health care education.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through thematic interviews with eight teachers to elicit their approaches to teaching in a 3DVW and their conceptions of teaching and learning with technology in online health care education.

Findings

Results indicate that teaching in 3DVWs necessitates the adoption of a student-centred approach to teaching. The teachers’ underlying approaches to teaching and learning became evident in their student-centred approach and use of problem-based activities. The immersive, social nature of the environment facilitated the creation of authentic, communicative learning activities created by the health care teachers and was in alignment with their disciplinary approaches to teaching and learning.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of the study is relatively small which limits the degree of external validity and generalisability of the results.

Practical implications

If sustainability of 3DVWs is to be achieved, academic development activities for teachers and their communities of practice may be necessary to support conceptual change and facilitate a shift to student-centred teaching where necessary.

Originality/value

There is limited research concerning the relationship between teachers’ approaches to teaching and the use of educational technologies, in particular the implementation of 3DVWs.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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