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Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Devanathan Sudharshan

Abstract

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Marketing in Customer Technology Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-601-3

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Jon Cabiria

Education and new technologies travel parallel pathways, with each often informing development of the other. In recent decades, educators have utilized technologies, such…

Abstract

Education and new technologies travel parallel pathways, with each often informing development of the other. In recent decades, educators have utilized technologies, such as television and the Internet, to develop and deliver course content. More recently, another technology has emerged that might possibly change education as it is currently practiced. Augmented reality merges manipulable digital imagery into real-world spaces and in real time. The technologies used to create augmented environments already exist in the mass market and have already begun to show up in a wide variety of fields, including education. This chapter will provide an overview of augmented reality and explore current and potential uses in higher education.

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Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Immersive Interfaces: Virtual Worlds, Gaming, and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-241-7

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Article
Publication date: 29 September 2012

Jim Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to introduce mobile augmented reality applications for library uses and next generation library services.

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5629

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce mobile augmented reality applications for library uses and next generation library services.

Design/methodology/approach

Examples are drawn from museum and archives informatics, computer science applied research, and computer vision research as well as original research and development work from the Undergraduate Library at the University of Illinois.

Findings

Mobile augmented reality uses include augmenting physical book stacks browsing, library navigation, optical character recognition, facial recognition, and building identification mobile software for compelling library experiences.

Originality/value

The paper suggests uses of mobile augmented reality applications in library settings and models a demonstration prototype interface.

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Peter Fernandez

This column aims to summarize developments in augmented reality and use those developments to help explain trends that influence the likelihood of mainstream adoption.

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916

Abstract

Purpose

This column aims to summarize developments in augmented reality and use those developments to help explain trends that influence the likelihood of mainstream adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The idea of augmented reality also drives the development of many other related technologies, including wearables, haptic technologies and many others that have been featured in this column.

Findings

Developers invest in the future based on the idea that widespread use of augmented reality is just around the corner. Yet in many ways, it still appears to be a technology eternally on the cusp of mainstream adoption.

Originality/value

In 2014, this column looked at augmented reality as an important emerging technology. Nearly three years later, some libraries continue to use it in groundbreaking ways, and it has grown by leaps and bounds.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Timothy Hyungsoo Jung and M. Claudia tom Dieck

This paper aims to propose a value co-creation framework through examining the opportunities of implementing augmented reality, virtual reality and 3D printing into the…

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5162

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a value co-creation framework through examining the opportunities of implementing augmented reality, virtual reality and 3D printing into the visitor experience at cultural heritage places.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes the conceptual model of value co-creation using a case-study approach by presenting some cases of a cultural heritage place in the UK.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that the effective use of multiple technologies in the context of cultural heritage places contributes to the co-creation of value for both cultural heritage organisations and also for visitors’ pre-visit, onsite and post-visit experience. Businesses can benefit from increased spending, intention to return and positive word-of-mouth, while visitors receive a personalised, educational, memorable and interactive experience.

Practical implications

Cultural heritage places have to find new ways to survive increasingly fierce competition. Using technology and the concept of value co-creation can prove to be a valuable concept in an attempt to attract new target markets, enhance visitors’ experience, create positive word-of-mouth and revisit intentions.

Originality/value

Recently, increased importance has been placed on the co-creation of value to account for consumers' interest in playing some part in the development of services and products. This study takes a holistic approach using augmented reality, virtual reality and 3D printing from a value co-creation perspective.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Soha Maad, Samir Garbaya and Saida Bouakaz

Digital media technology is becoming an integral part of our daily activities, with widespread penetration in various application domains including arts, medicine…

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1078

Abstract

Purpose

Digital media technology is becoming an integral part of our daily activities, with widespread penetration in various application domains including arts, medicine, education, and commerce. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the horizon of emerging digital media technologies in electronic financial trading with reference to a novel application drawing expertise from two important fields of study, namely: digital media (video and image) processing and augmented reality.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an ergonomic study that considers the potential utility and usability of augmented reality (AR) in finance. In order to justify the outcome of this ergonomic study, the authors describe the technology under study (CYBERII) and its implementation in finance. This ergonomic study is based on a comparative analysis of the use of AR with a counterpart virtual reality (VR) approach used for the same application.

Findings

The comparative analysis highlights an added value in the shift from the use of VR to AR in electronic financial trading. This added value is gained from augmented realism and less constrained interaction. The paper discusses the challenges and rewards of the emerging digital media technologies in meeting the needs of electronic commerce applications, particularly in electronic financial trading. The main considerations taken into account are the realism of rendering, system portability, and widespread usability.

Originality/value

This study motivates further ergonomic studies involving the evaluation of augmented reality integration including CYBERII technology, in the field of electronic commerce.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Xuewei Yang

This research aims to explore the impact of augmented reality (AR), the digital technology that superimposes virtual elements in a real environment, on consumers in the…

Abstract

This research aims to explore the impact of augmented reality (AR), the digital technology that superimposes virtual elements in a real environment, on consumers in the context of experiential marketing. Specifically, this study proposes a research model based on the stimulus-organism-response model, which considers AR media characteristics as external stimuli, consumers’ value perceptions as the organisms, and purchase intentions as the responses. The research model was tested with 248 consumers using structural equation modelling. The results show that informativeness, ease of use, and telepresence have positive effects on consumers’ utilitarian value perception and that telepresence and interactivity have positive effects on hedonic value perception. Overall, this study contributes to the growing body of knowledge on AR and provides actionable insights for managers implementing digital transformation strategies and AR applications in marketing practices.

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Information Technology in Organisations and Societies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from AI to Technostress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-812-3

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Book part
Publication date: 9 January 2014

This chapter focuses on visualization. Seeing the humanities differently is one of the amazing benefits of working with tools mentioned within this category. Whether it be…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on visualization. Seeing the humanities differently is one of the amazing benefits of working with tools mentioned within this category. Whether it be more traditional visualizations like images or video or that which is considered a bit more advanced like augmented or virtual reality, the enhanced perspective gained through the use of these tools offers digital humanities scholars unprecedented disciplinary perspectives while helping to shape new research areas, questions, and understanding of humanity and culture. In addition to visualization and issues related to it, this chapter also examines gaming and how games and play are impacting the digital humanities in exciting ways.

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Digital Humanities: Current Perspective, Practices, and Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-689-7

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Clement Onime, James Uhomoibhi, Hui Wang and Mattia Santachiara

This paper presents a reclassification of markers for mixed reality environments that is also applicable to the use of markers in robot navigation systems and 3D…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a reclassification of markers for mixed reality environments that is also applicable to the use of markers in robot navigation systems and 3D modelling. In the case of Augmented Reality (AR) mixed reality environments, markers are used to integrate computer generated (virtual) objects into a predominantly real world, while in Augmented Virtuality (AV) mixed reality environments, the goal is to integrate real objects into a predominantly virtual (computer generated) world. Apart from AR/AV classifications, mixed reality environments have also been classified by reality; output technology/display devices; immersiveness as well as by visibility of markers.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted consists of presenting six existing classifications of mixed reality environments and then extending them to define new categories of abstract, blended, virtual augmented, active and smart markers. This is supported with results/examples taken from the joint Mixed Augmented and Virtual Reality Laboratory (MAVRLAB) of the Ulster University, Belfast, Northern Ireland; the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy and Santasco SrL, Regio Emilia/Milan, Italy.

Findings

Existing classification of markers and mixed reality environments are mainly binary in nature and do not adequately capture the contextual relationship between markers and their use and application. The reclassification of markers into abstract, blended and virtual categories captures the context for simple use and applications while the categories of augmented, active and smart markers captures the relationship for enhanced or more complex use of markers. The new classifications are capable of improving the definitions of existing simple marker and markerless mixed reality environments as well as supporting more complex features within mixed reality environments such as co-location of objects, advanced interactivity, personalised user experience.

Research limitations/implications

It is thought that applications and devices in mixed reality environments when properly developed and deployed enhances the real environment by making invisible information visible to the user. The current work only marginally covers the use of internet of things (IoT) devices in mixed reality environments as well as potential implications for robot navigation systems and 3D modelling.

Practical implications

The use of these reclassifications enables researchers, developers and users of mixed reality environments to select and make informed decisions on best tools and environment for their respective application, while conveying information with additional clarity and accuracy. The development and application of more complex markers would contribute in no small measure to attaining greater advancements in extending current knowledge and developing applications to positively impact entertainment, business and health while minimizing costs and maximizing benefits.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in the approach adopted in reclassifying markers. This is supported with results and work carried out at the MAV Reality Laboratory of Ulster University, Belfast–UK, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste-Italy and Santasco SrL, Regio Emilia, Milan–Italy. The value of present research lies in the definitions of new categories as well as the discussions of how they improve mixed reality environments and application especially in the health and education sectors.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Larissa Neuburger, Julia Beck and Roman Egger

The concept of touristic space is continually evolving, due to the advent of new technologies. Today, physical space and virtual space are interwoven, creating a…

Abstract

The concept of touristic space is continually evolving, due to the advent of new technologies. Today, physical space and virtual space are interwoven, creating a phenomenon that can be described using the term ‘phygital’. The perception of touristic space as well as the interaction with it has been altered by phygital appearances and changing travel behaviour. While interaction with the touristic space previously only occupied a physical dimension, virtual information now enriches all stages of the customer journey (CJ). Hence, this chapter deals with new technologies, analysing their impact on the perception of touristic space for the traveller throughout the whole CJ. Thereby Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality are cited as examples of state-of-the-art technologies, which wield a direct perceptional impact, as they have the power to blend together one’s perception of real and virtual space.

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