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Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2013

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Advances in Positive Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-000-1

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Jill Hoxmeier, Juliana Carlson, Erin Casey and Claire Willey-Sthapit

The purpose of this study is to examine men’s engagement in anti-sexual violence activism, including the frequency of their participation, whether demographic correlates, as well…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine men’s engagement in anti-sexual violence activism, including the frequency of their participation, whether demographic correlates, as well as a history of sexual harassment perpetration, relate to frequency, and the extent to which those correlates explain variation in frequency.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this cross-sectional study were collected in 2020; participants were 474 men, 18–40 years of age, who live in the USA.

Findings

Descriptive findings show that in the past year, about two-thirds of the men engaged in at least one of the behaviors related to anti-violence activism examined here but with relatively low frequency. Hierarchical regression modeling showed that several of men’s demographic characteristics were significantly related to an increase in frequency, including sexual minoritized identity, education, mother’s education and being a father/parent, as well as past year sexual harassment perpetration in a fourth model. Overall, these variables explained approximately 22% of the variance in frequency of activism.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is not representative of the US population. There is potential for the frequency of activism and engagement to be explained by individuals’ access to opportunities for activism.

Practical implications

This paper discusses implications for practitioners who want to engage men in anti-violence activism.

Social implications

Engaging men in anti-violence activism is critical to end sexual violence.

Originality/value

This study responds to the call for investigations of bystander intervention to include pro-active helping, outside of intervention in high-risk situations for violence and to examine such beyond college students.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Sarah Stewart‐Brown

This paper reviews current evidence of the significance of interpersonal relationships ‐ at community, workplace, school and family levels ‐ in influencing mental health and…

Abstract

This paper reviews current evidence of the significance of interpersonal relationships ‐ at community, workplace, school and family levels ‐ in influencing mental health and well‐being. It argues that the parent‐child relationship is of pre‐eminent importance both because of its direct effect on future mental health and because it sets the scene for future relationships. It also argues that, because of the reciprocal nature of the relationships, the mental health of society can be improved by improving the mental health of any of its individual members. From this it follows that to focus mental health promotion programmes entirely on the most vulnerable limits the potential for improvement, because working with people who are not mentally ill will increase their ability to support those who are. Universal mental health promotion programmes should therefore have relationships ‐ and parent‐child relationships in particular ‐ at their heart, aiming to improve everyone's capacity to relate supportively and respectfully to others.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1983

E. Carlson, M. Kipps and J. Thomson

Many case studies on minority ethnic groups have been concerned with the social, structural and economic patterns of these communities. Knowing how these patterns have influenced…

Abstract

Many case studies on minority ethnic groups have been concerned with the social, structural and economic patterns of these communities. Knowing how these patterns have influenced the ethnic identity in some cases, the authors believe that they can extrapolate from the strength of the social cohesion of a group to the possible strength of the group's traditional food habits. This series of articles emphasises the strength of traditional food habits in a different cultural environment, and the factors which contribute to this strength.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 83 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Mary T. Brownell, Melinda M. Leko, Margaret Kamman and Laura King

Research over the last decade or so has made it clear that quality teachers matter to student achievement. What is less clear is the ways in which they matter and how we can…

Abstract

Research over the last decade or so has made it clear that quality teachers matter to student achievement. What is less clear is the ways in which they matter and how we can prepare such high-quality teachers. Nowhere is this lack of clarity more evident than in special education, where we have few studies on teacher quality and even fewer studies on the type of preparation opportunities that would lead to high quality. Thus, it is difficult to make evidence-based decisions about how quality special education teachers should be defined and prepared. As a field, we have to turn to research in general education to provide a sense of some of the dimensions of teacher quality and effective teacher education. In this chapter, we provide a summary of the research on characteristics of highly qualified teachers and what we know from the research on teacher education and professional development that might foster these qualities, both in general and in special education. Part of our discussion centers on the concerns surrounding this body of research and the challenges of applying the findings to the field of special education. Although these challenges pose considerable problems, we are optimistic that potential solutions exist and can be reached through an alignment of initial teacher education and induction.

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Personnel Preparation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-59749-274-4

Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2023

Angela Genova, Alice Scavarda and Maria Świątkiewicz-Mośny

Welfare policies for persons with disabilities have been strongly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and this introductory chapter provides the theoretical background to the book…

Abstract

Welfare policies for persons with disabilities have been strongly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and this introductory chapter provides the theoretical background to the book. Definition, data and main European policies about disabilities are outlined. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) is the key pillar of disability policies in European countries. In line with a Disability Studies perspective, COVID-19 health surveillance regime has been a challenge in the implementation process of the UNCRPD, highlighting the role of lay knowledge and community of practices in managing everyday challenges for persons with disabilities and their families, and therefore their potential role in becoming part of epistemic communities to support the policy making and implementation process of the UNCRPD.

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2021

Ravi S. Kudesia and Tingting Lang

Routines are the very material of human organization. But there is little guarantee that routines will be enacted flexibly enough to ensure that organization survives. Mindfulness…

Abstract

Routines are the very material of human organization. But there is little guarantee that routines will be enacted flexibly enough to ensure that organization survives. Mindfulness has been offered as a guarantor of sorts, but it remains unclear exactly what people mean by mindfulness and how mindfulness might relate to routines. This chapter reviews evolving conceptions of mindfulness and routines—from Langer’s early work to routine dynamics to Levinthal and Rerup’s seminal debate with Weick and Sutcliffe. It puts forth the argument that the recent theory of mindfulness as metacognitive practice retains important insights from throughout this conceptual evolution, while resolving ambiguity and debate about the relation between mindfulness and routines in at least four critical areas related to agency, duality, flexibility, and social organization. This resolution, in turn, opens up further avenues to understand the social processes by which people come to understand their minds—and how this understanding embeds within organization itself.

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Thinking about Cognition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-824-2

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2017

Brenda Jones Harden, Brandee Feola, Colleen Morrison, Shelby Brown, Laura Jimenez Parra and Andrea Buhler Wassman

Children experience toxic stress if there is pronounced activation of their stress-response systems, in situations in which they do not have stable caregiving. Due to their…

Abstract

Children experience toxic stress if there is pronounced activation of their stress-response systems, in situations in which they do not have stable caregiving. Due to their exposure to multiple poverty-related risks, African American children may be more susceptible to exposure to toxic stress. Toxic stress affects young children’s brain and neurophysiologic functioning, which leads to a wide range of deleterious health, developmental, and mental health outcomes. Given the benefits of early care and education (ECE) for African American young children, ECE may represent a compensating experience for this group of children, and promote their positive development.

Details

African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

W. Florez, H. Power and F. Chejne

This paper presents a boundary element method (BEM) based on a subdomain approach for the solution of non‐Newtonian fluid flow problems which include thermal effects and viscous…

Abstract

This paper presents a boundary element method (BEM) based on a subdomain approach for the solution of non‐Newtonian fluid flow problems which include thermal effects and viscous dissipation. The volume integral arising from non‐linear terms is converted into equivalent boundary integrals by the multi‐domain dual reciprocity method (MD‐DRM) in each subdomain. Augmented thin plate splines interpolation functions are used for the approximation of field variables. The iterative numerical formulation is achieved by viewing the material as divided into small elements and on each of them the integral representation formulae for the velocity and temperature are applied and discretised using linear boundary elements. The final system of non‐linear algebraic equations is solved by a modified Newton's method. The numerical examples include non‐Newtonian problems with viscous dissipation, temperature‐dependent viscosity and natural convection due to bouyancy forces.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Nadine Joelle Mellor, Leanne Ingram, Marc Van Huizen, John Arnold and Anne-Helen Harding

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of mindfulness training (MT) on employee well-being. Mindfulness is the awareness of one’s thoughts, emotions, sensations…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of mindfulness training (MT) on employee well-being. Mindfulness is the awareness of one’s thoughts, emotions, sensations, actions and surroundings in the present moment.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used pre-post training measures and a four-week follow-up on a sample of 23 employees from a UK-based organization. The MT group (n=12) received a weekly two-hour training over eight weeks whilst the control group (n=11) received no training. Qualitative interviews (n=36) were conducted with the MT group at three time points to further assess the subjective experiences of training participants.

Findings

Compared to the control group, the MT group significantly increased their mindfulness skills including observing and acting with awareness. Scores on well-being, i.e. satisfaction with life, hope and anxiety also improved and were generally maintained at follow-up. Some improvements were seen in the control group too but there was a larger difference in change scores in the MT group on most variables. Qualitative data show additional benefits of MT such as improved concentration at work and better interpersonal relationships. More practice at home led to greater benefits suggesting a dose-response relationship between the amount of practice and substantial benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Inviting participants to have a greater amount of practice between sessions may further increase the benefits of mindfulness. Future research should consider a longer follow-up period to further explore the sustainability of the training benefits.

Originality/value

Employing a mixed-method approach, this study showed that MT is a viable psychological intervention for enhancing employee well-being.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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